Press regulation on a sinking ship – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted March 28th, 2012 in defamation, freedom of expression, human rights, media, news by sally

“It was coincidental that this cricket libel case and Lady Justice Arden’s speech on media intrusion and human rights ‘Striking the Balance’ came out on the same day.”

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UK Human Rights Blog, 28th March 2012

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

Appeasement it may be, but exclusion of Iranian dissident not a matter for the courts – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted March 22nd, 2012 in freedom of expression, Iran, news, parliament by sally

“The High Court has upheld an order by the Home Secretary preventing Maryam Rajavi, a prominent Iranian dissident, from speaking in Parliament. The exclusion order was imposed because of concerns about the deterioration of bilateral relationships between this country and the Iranian government, and fears that if the exclusion order was lifted there could be reprisals that put British nationals at risk and make further consular cooperation even more problematic. For further details of the Home Secretary’s decision see Henry Oliver’s excellent discussion of the case ‘Free Speech and Iranian Dissent in Parliament’.”

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UK Human Rights Blog, 21st March 2012

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

Free speech on Facebook: unless you offend! – Halsbury’s Law Exchange

Posted March 21st, 2012 in freedom of expression, internet, news, public order by sally

“No sooner had HLE published a post on the joke (in every sense) trial of Paul Chambers than another story appears which leaves one wondering how many in officialdom have even heard of free speech, let alone understood it.”

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Halsbury’s Law Exchange, 20th March 2012

Source: www.halsburyslawexchange.co.uk

Strasbourg rules on anti-gay speech for the first time – UK Human Rights Blog

“‘Will both teacher and pupils simply become the next victims of the tyranny of tolerance, heretics, whose dissent from state-imposed orthodoxy must be crushed at all costs?’, asked Cardinal O’Brien in his controversial Telegraph article on gay-marriage. He was suggesting that changing the law to allow gay marriage would affect education as it would preclude a teacher from telling pupils that marriage can only mean a heterosexual union. He later insinuated that the change might lead to students being given material such as an ‘explicit manual of homosexual advocacy entitled The Little Black Book: Queer in the 21st Century.'”

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UK Human Rights Blog, 13th March 2012

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

#WithoutPrejudice podcast 22: FREE SPEECH – Charon QC

Posted March 9th, 2012 in defamation, freedom of expression, podcasts, privacy by tracey

“Tonight’s topic is Free Speech and how privacy and libel law may impact on this cherished right.”

Podcast

Charon QC, 9th March 2012

Source: www.charonqc.wordpress.com

“Charon QC” is the blogging pseudonym of Mike Semple Piggot, editor of insitelaw newswire.

Pursue masked protesters more vigorously, CPS says – The Guardian

“People who mask their faces to conceal their identity or carry anything that could be used as a weapon during protests should be pursued more vigorously by the law in the event of disorder, according to fresh guidance from the Crown Prosecution Service.”

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The Guardian, 6th March 2012

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Former cricketer Chris Cairns sues in libel tourism case – Daily Telegraph

“Ex-New Zealand cricketer Chris Cairns, who is suing a former Indian Premier League boss over a Twitter posting, will have his case heard by the High Court today in the latest example of libel tourism.”

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Daily Telegraph, 5th March 2012

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Caroline Spelman facing six-figure legal bill over bid to stop press printing story about son – Daily Telegraph

Posted February 25th, 2012 in freedom of expression, injunctions, media, news, privacy, public interest, sport by tracey

“Environment Secretary Caroline Spelman is facing a six-figure legal bill after losing a High Court bid to stop a newspaper publishing a story about her teenage son’s rugby-playing career.”

Full story

Daily Telegraph, 24th February 2012

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

City of London v Samede and others – WLR Daily

City of London v Samede and others: [2012] EWCA Civ 160;  [2012] WLR (D)  41

“While it could be appropriate for the court to take into account the general character of the views whose expression the Convention on Human Rights was being invoked to protect, namely the article 10 (freedom of expression) and article 11 (freedom of assembly) rights of demonstrators on the public highway, it was very difficult to see how those rights could ever prevail against the will of the landowner when the demonstrators were continuously and exclusively occupying public land, breaching not just the owner’s property rights and certain statutory provisions, but significantly interfering with the public and Convention rights of others, and causing other problems connected with health, nuisance and the like, especially in circumstances where the occupation had already continued for months and was likely to continue indefinitely.”

WLR Daily, 22nd February 2012

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

Speak no evil: the limits of freedom of speech – Halsbury’s Law Exchange

Posted February 13th, 2012 in freedom of expression, homosexuality, news, threatening behaviour by sally

“The limits of free speech and freedom of religion are presently on trial once again with the reported prosecution of a Christian street preacher, Michael Overd, in the Magistrates’ Court. The case arises out of threatening remarks Mr Overd allegedly made in public to a homosexual couple.”

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Halsbury’s Law Exchange, 13th February 2012

Source: www.halsburyslawexchange.co.uk

Reporting on celebrities’ private lives can be legitimate, European Court of Human Rights rules – OUT-LAW.com

Posted February 8th, 2012 in freedom of expression, human rights, media, news, privacy, public interest by sally

“The media can legitimately publish articles and photographs about celebrities without their approval providing they have balanced their rights to freedom of expression with the individuals’ privacy rights, the European Court of Human Rights has ruled.”

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OUT-LAW.com, 8th February 2012

Source: www.out-law.com

Contempt laws are still valid in the internet age – The Guardian

Posted February 8th, 2012 in contempt of court, freedom of expression, internet, media, news by sally

“Social media undoubtedly poses a challenge for enforcement, but the Contempt of Court Act is a sound piece of legislation.”

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The Guardian, 8th February 2012

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Times contempt challenge thrown out in Strasbourg – UK Human Rights Blog

“The European Court of Human Rights has rejected as ‘inadmissible’ Times Newspaper’s challenge to its 2009 conviction for contempt of court. The decision, which was made by six judges, is a good example of an early stage ‘strike-out’ by the Court which is nonetheless a substantial, reasoned decision (see our posts on the ‘UK loses 3 out of 4 cases at the court’ controversy).”

Full story

UK Human Rights Blog, 8th February 2012

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

Twitter joke case reaches high court – The Guardian

“A Doncaster man who said on Twitter that he would blow up a snowbound airport if it was not reopened in time for him to fly to see his girlfriend will appeal to the high court in London on Wednesday to overturn a criminal conviction for menacing use of a public communication system.”

Full story

The Guardian, 8th February 2012

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Met police investigators at News Corp jeopardise press freedom, say lawyers – The Guardian

Posted February 6th, 2012 in freedom of expression, interception, media, news, police by sally

“The Metropolitan police has a team of up to 20 detectives based at News Corporation’s internal investigation unit in Wapping, a move which leading media and human rights lawyers say puts press freedom in jeopardy.”

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The Guardian, 5th February 2012

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Comedians can say ‘mong’ on TV, rules Ofcom – Daily Telegraph

Posted January 24th, 2012 in complaints, freedom of expression, media, news by sally

“Media regulator Ofcom has rejected three complaints about comedian Ricky Gervais’s use of the word ‘mong’ during his Channel 4 show Science.”

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Daily Telegraph, 23rd January 2012

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

You Can’t Read This Book: why libel tourists love London – The Guardian

Posted January 17th, 2012 in choice of forum, defamation, freedom of expression, media, news, publishing by sally

“In an exclusive extract from You Can’t Read This Book, the Observer columnist Nick Cohen presents a damning indictment of how the English legal system helps the wealthy and powerful suppress inconvenient truths.”

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The Guardian, 15th January 2012

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Babar Ahmad ruling is a victory for freedom of expression – The Guardian

Posted January 12th, 2012 in BBC, extradition, freedom of expression, news, public interest by sally

“The justice secretary certainly acted unlawfully in refusing to allow the BBC to interview Babar Ahmad, a British prisoner wanted in the US on terrorism charges, as the high court has found. But once the judgment came out, Ken Clarke showed none of the stubbornness associated with previous prisons ministers, telling the court that he would not be seeking to appeal.”

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The Guardian, 12th January 2012

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

BBC wins right to broadcast prisoner interview – BBC News

Posted January 11th, 2012 in detention, freedom of expression, human rights, media, news, public interest, terrorism by sally

“The High Court has ruled that Justice Secretary Ken Clarke was wrong to stop the BBC filming a terrorism suspect held for seven years without trial.”

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BBC News, 11th January 2012

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Is internet access a human right? – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted January 11th, 2012 in freedom of expression, human rights, internet, news by sally

“A recent United Nations Human Rights Council report examined the important question of whether internet access is a human right.”

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UK Human Rights Blog, 11th January 2012

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com