Neuberger and Grieve join legal regulation review – Legal Futures

Posted October 3rd, 2018 in competition, legal services, news, regulations by sally

‘The former president of the Supreme Court, Lord Neuberger, and former Attorney General Dominic Grieve are on the advisory panel for an independent review of the regulatory framework for legal services.’

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Legal Futures, 3rd October 2018

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

Revealed: immigration rules in UK more than double in length – The Guardian

Posted August 30th, 2018 in government departments, immigration, news, regulations, visas by sally

‘Home Office officials have made more than 5,700 changes to the immigration rules since 2010, a Guardian analysis has revealed, making the visa system nearly impossible to navigate, according to senior judges and lawyers.’

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The Guardian, 27th August 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

British Accession to the Hague Agreement – NIPC Law

Posted August 21st, 2018 in agreements, consultations, intellectual property, news, regulations, treaties by sally

‘On 13 March 2018 the British government deposited with the Director General of the World Intellectual Property Organization (“WIPO”) an instrument of ratification of the Geneva Act of the Hague Agreement Concerning the International Registration of Industrial Designs (“the Hague Agreement”). The deposit of that instrument enabled the UK to join the Hague system for the registration of industrial designs from 13 June 2018. The Hague system allows businesses to register up to 100 designs in 69 countries in a single application.’

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NIPC Law, 18th August 2018

Source: nipclaw.blogspot.com

Too Hot to Work? Your Rights in a Heatwave – Rights Info

‘Most of your conversations in the workplace over the last few weeks have probably involved the weather, with blazing temperatures sweeping across much of the UK. MPs have warned that the current heatwave could become the new normal for our summers by 2040, so what are your rights when the mercury rises?’

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Rights Info, 26th July 2018

Source: rightsinfo.org

Safestyle UK: Window firm fined for ‘aggressive sales’ – BBC News

Posted July 17th, 2018 in advertising, consumer protection, fines, news, regulations by tracey

‘A double-glazing windows and doors firm which used aggressive sales techniques and lied to customers to secure sales has been fined £120,000. Sheffield Crown Court heard Safestyle UK employees used a variety of “unlawful business practices” to apply pressure to homeowners.

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BBC News, 16th July 2018

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Facing up to it – Nearly Legal

‘Kamara v London Borough Of Southwark (2018) EWCA Civ 1616. In Makisi & Ors v Birmingham City Council (2011) EWCA Civ 355 (our report), the Court of Appeal decided that the right to make ‘oral submissions’ in response to a ‘minded to’ letter under 8(2) of the 1999 Review Procedures Regulations meant a right to request ‘face to face’ advocacy in making representations. In these three joined appeals, the sole issue was whether this meant that the ‘minded to’ to letter had to specify the right to a face to face meeting for representations.’

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Nearly Legal, 15th July 2018

Source: nearlylegal.co.uk

Drone rules made law to reduce threat to aircraft – The Guardian

Posted May 31st, 2018 in aircraft, airports, bills, news, penalties, regulations by sally

‘The government has announced measures to tackle the dangers drones can pose to people, aircraft and airports.’

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The Guardian, 30th May 2018

Source: www.theguardian.com

What is GDPR and how will it affect you? – The Guardian

Posted May 22nd, 2018 in data protection, EC law, news, privacy, regulations by sally

‘You could be forgiven for thinking that Europe’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is a law created to fill your inbox with identikit warnings from every company you have ever interacted with online that “the privacy policy has changed” and pleas to “just click here so we can stay in touch”.’

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The Guardian, 21st May 2018

Source: www.theguardian.com

Most GDPR emails unnecessary and some illegal, say experts – The Guardian

Posted May 22nd, 2018 in consent, data protection, EC law, electronic mail, news, regulations by sally

‘The vast majority of emails flooding inboxes across Europe from companies asking for consent to keep recipients on their mailing list are unnecessary and some may be illegal, privacy experts have said, as new rules over data privacy come into force at the end of this week.’

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The Guardian, 21st May 2018

Source: www.theguardian.com

New UK trade secrets laws imminent – OUT-LAW.com

Posted May 17th, 2018 in consultations, EC law, intellectual property, legislation, news, regulations by tracey

‘New trade secrets laws are scheduled to be published by the UK government before the end of this month.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 16th May 2018

Source: www.out-law.com

Network and information security laws take effect – OUT-LAW.com

‘New cybersecurity laws impacting organisations across central sectors of the economy have taken effect around Europe.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 10th May 2018

Source: www.out-law.com

New Europe law makes it easy to find out what your boss has said about you – The Guardian

‘General Data Protection Regulation holds that anyone in Europe can ask any company for the data it has on them.’

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The Guardian, 24th April 2018

Source: www.theguardian.com

Police error meant ‘speeding’ motorists paid fines but never exceeded the limit – Daily Telegraph

Posted April 10th, 2018 in drafting, fines, mistake, news, police, regulations, road traffic, speed cameras by tracey

‘A police force has admitted it has wrongly fined ‘speeding’ motorists after a clerical error meant the speed limit was never officially lowered. Avon and Somerset Police face having to cancel hundreds of tickets after a motorist successfully overturned his fine.’

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Daily Telegraph, 9th April 2018

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Worboys’ release quashed – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted April 4th, 2018 in judicial review, news, parole, rape, regulations, sexual offences by sally

‘On 28th March 2018 a three-judge panel of the Divisional Court gave its decision in R (DSD and Ors) v The Parole Board of England and Wales [2018] EWHC 694 (Admin), ruling that the Parole Board’s decision to direct the release of John Worboys (the ‘black cab rapist’) should be quashed.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 13th April 2018

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Worboys release decision overturned as Parole head quits – BBC News

Posted March 28th, 2018 in judicial review, news, parole, rape, regulations, sexual offences by tracey

‘A decision by the Parole Board to release the rapist John Worboys has been quashed, as the Board’s chairman Nick Hardwick resigns.’

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BBC News, 28th March 2018

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Gambling regulator says FOBT stakes could be set higher than £2 – The Guardian

Posted March 19th, 2018 in gambling, news, regulations by sally

‘The UK’s gambling regulator has given the government the all-clear to defy calls to cut the stakes on the roulette-style games offered on controversial fixed-odds betting terminals (FOBTs) to £2.’

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The Guardian, 19th March 2018

Source: www.theguardian.com

Sir Stephen Laws: Giving “Deemed” Domestic Law Status to Retained EU Law – Constitutional Law Association

Posted March 1st, 2018 in bills, drafting, EC law, legislation, news, regulations, treaties by sally

‘In his latest blog on the European Union (Withdrawal) Bill, Paul Craig criticises the recommendation of the House of Lords Constitution Committee (“HLCC”), at paras 70 and 93, that all retained direct EU law (defined by the HLCC to encompass all the law continued under clauses 3 and 4 of the Withdrawal Bill) should be given the status of domestic primary legislation passed immediately before exit day. He suggests, instead, a hierarchy in which some law continued in force under clause 3 should be “deemed to be a statutory instrument”. This formulation is intended, it seems, to do more than its usual job (which is confined to attracting the provisions of the Statutory Instruments 1946, which are largely irrelevant for present purposes). It appears to be intended, instead, to give the law in question the status of subordinate legislation made under legislative powers delegated to the executive. But what practical effects is it designed to produce?’

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Constitutional Law Association, 28th February 2018

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

The right of appeal against refusal of a residence card: where are we up to? – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted February 28th, 2018 in human rights, immigration, news, regulations by sally

‘One way for an immigrant to gain the right to be in the UK is by making an application under the Immigration Rules. But these applications are relatively expensive and the requirements have become increasingly stringent.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 27th February 2018

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

I can serve this only once – gas safety certificates – Nearly Legal

Posted February 12th, 2018 in energy, health & safety, housing, landlord & tenant, news, regulations by tracey

‘Caridon Property Ltd v Monty Shooltz. Central London County Court. 2 February 2018 (from note of judgment). This was an appeal to a circuit judge of a first instance decision of District Judge Bloom (who is an experienced housing lawyer). The circuit judge was HHJ Jan Luba QC (a very experienced housing lawyer).’

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Nearly Legal, 11th February 2018

Source: nearlylegal.co.uk

When to adjourn a misconduct hearing – UK Police Law Blog

Posted February 12th, 2018 in adjournment, disciplinary procedures, news, police, professional conduct, regulations by tracey

‘When must a police misconduct hearing adjourn the proceedings for the attendance of the respondent officer or even a witness?’

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UK Police Law Blog, 9th February 2018

Source: ukpolicelawblog.com