COVID-19 and Insolvency Law: Key Implications of th – 3 Hare Court

Posted June 4th, 2020 in bills, chambers articles, coronavirus, insolvency, news by sally

‘The COVID-19 pandemic has caused unprecedented disruption to the economy and to businesses, many of whom are now facing significant financial difficulty. The Government presented the Corporate Insolvency and Governance Bill to Parliament on 20 May 2020 (“the Bill”). The Bill includes several provisions designed to guard against a deluge of insolvencies during this period and, if enacted, will operate retrospectively.’

Full Story

3 Hare Court, 2nd June 2020

Source: www.3harecourt.com

The New Corporate Insolvency and Governance Bill – A Summary of the Key Provisions – Radcliffe Chambers

Posted June 3rd, 2020 in bills, chambers articles, company law, coronavirus, insolvency, news by sally

‘This summary gives a short overview of the Corporate Insolvency and Governance Bill, which was first read in the House of Commons
on 20 May 2020 and is intended to proceed to the House of Lords following its final stages in the House of Commons on 3 June 2020. This Bill represents the biggest reforms to the UK’s insolvency framework since the Enterprise Act in 2002. The aim is to allow more tools to rescue struggling companies as a going concern and help more businesses weather the COVID-19 storm and avoid entering an insolvency process.’

Full Story

Radcliffe Chambers, 26th May 2020

Source: radcliffechambers.com

Ali Tabari reviews key points of the new Corporate Insolvency and Governance Bill, and sets out three key areas for litigators to start preparing for – St Philips Barristers

Posted May 29th, 2020 in bills, coronavirus, insolvency, news by sally

‘Last week saw the first reading in the House of Commons of the Corporate Insolvency and Governance Bill [“CIGB”], which is the Government’s attempt to mitigate the impact of COVID-19 on businesses which should otherwise have been viable. From a parliamentary point of view, it is still at an early stage but, given the importance and urgency of this piece of legislation, it is worth considering some of the key points which arise from a high-level overview, so that you and your clients can try to plan accordingly. Not all of the provisions will survive into the finalised Act, but early Bills are often a good indicator of the overall aims of the legislation. This article does not deal with each and every point to arise from the CIGB, which currently runs to 238 pages including 14 Schedules, but signposts the crucial areas.’

Full Story

St Philips Barristers, 25th May 2020

Source: st-philips.com

Why British Troops Must Not Be Placed Above The Law – Each Other

Posted May 28th, 2020 in armed forces, bills, news, time limits, torture, war crimes by sally

‘The outbreak of Covid-19 has demonstrated how quickly our established ideas and normalised ways of thinking can be changed. Work that was called ‘low-skilled’ is now recognised as ‘essential’, the nation has hailed nurses as ‘heroes’, and face masks are a part of routine life.’

Full Story

Each Other, 22nd May 2020

Source: eachother.org.uk

EP 113: Tracking Coronavirus Symptoms: an erosion of privacy? – Professor Lilian Edwards – Law Pod UK

Posted May 27th, 2020 in bills, coronavirus, internet, news, podcasts, privacy, telecommunications by sally

‘With the new contact tracing app due to be rolled out in the rest of the UK after the Isle of Wight trial in May, Rosalind English discusses privacy concerns with Professor Lilian Edwards of Newcastle University, whose Bill seeks to address some of these concerns.’

Full Story

Law Pod UK, 26th May 2020

Source: audioboom.com

MPs and peers call for legal requirement to delete UK contact-tracing data – The Guardian

Posted May 21st, 2020 in bills, coronavirus, data protection, internet, news, select committees by sally

‘The government must legally swear to delete all the data it captures using the NHS Covid-19 contact-tracing app, a committee of MPs and peers has urged.’

Full Story

The Guardian, 15th May 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Max and Keira’s Law: Mum ‘blown away’ by organ transplant legacy – BBC News

Posted May 20th, 2020 in bills, consent, news, organ transplants by sally

‘The mother of a girl who helped inspire a new law making all adults in England potential organ donors has said she is “blown away” by her daughter’s legacy.’

Full Story

BBC News, 20th May 2020

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Unconvicted terrorism suspects face indefinite controls under UK bill – The Guardian

‘Terrorism suspects who have not been convicted of any offence face expanded and potentially never-ending measures to control their lives under proposed counter-terrorism laws unveiled by the UK government.’

Full Story

The Guardian, 20th May 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

An Act for the App? Is the NHS contact app bad for your privacy? – Doughty Street Chambers

‘Following the publication last week by the Joint Committee on Human Rights of its report on the proposed NHS App and the risk of adverse effects on privacy and human rights, the Committee has drafted a Bill – the Digital Contact Tracing (Data Protection Bill) – and sent it to the Health Secretary, Matt Hancock.’

Full Story

Doughty Street Chambers, 12th May 2020

Source: insights.doughtystreet.co.uk

UK contact-tracing app could fall foul of privacy law, government told – The Guardian

‘The NHS contact-tracing app must not be rolled out across the UK until the government has increased privacy and data protections, an influential parliamentary committee has said, as rights groups warn that the current trial is unlawful under the Data Protection Act.’

Full Story

The Guardian, 7th May 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

MPs to try to ban ‘rough sex’ murder defence in domestic abuse bill – The Guardian

Posted April 28th, 2020 in bills, defences, domestic violence, murder, news by sally

‘MPs are to try to outlaw the courtroom murder defence of “rough sex gone wrong” during parliamentary debates on the domestic abuse bill, as cases of domestic violence soar during the coronavirus lockdown.’

Full Story

The Guardian, 28th April 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Fisheries Bill 2020: What Does it have in Stock? – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted April 22nd, 2020 in bills, brexit, EC law, environmental protection, fisheries, news by sally

‘The Fisheries Bill 2020, part of the government’s core legislative program on post-Brexit environmental policy, is currently in the House of Lords at committee stage, and is expected to receive royal assent in the coming months (although exactly when is subject to how successfully the House of Lords can adapt to meeting via Microsoft Teams). It would establish Britain’s departure from the Common Fisheries Policy (CFP) on January 1st 2021, and sets out how fishing rights would work post transition period and CFP.’

Full Story

UK Human Rights Blog, 21st April 2020

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Lifting The Lockdown: Is A Phone App The Answer? – Each Other

‘With the UK’s coronavirus lockdown extended for three more weeks, some people are looking towards a planned NHS phone app as “holding the key” to easing restrictions. But how realistic is this expectation and could there be unexpected consequences? EachOther examines.’

Full Story

Each Other, 16th April 2020

Source: eachother.org.uk

Proposed amendments to the Human Rights Act to disadvantage UK war crimes victims – Oxford Human Rights Hub

Posted April 8th, 2020 in armed forces, bills, compensation, human rights, news, time limits, war crimes by sally

‘On 18 March 2020, the UK Minister for Defence introduced into the UK Parliament his promised package of new legislation designed to ‘protect veterans’. Entitled the Overseas Operations (Service Personnel and Veterans) Bill, the proposed laws would amend the UK’s Human Rights Act 1998 (HRA) in ways that impact on its human rights obligations, including under the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR).’

Full Story

Oxford Human Rights Hub, 6th April 2020

Source: ohrh.law.ox.ac.uk

Gethin Thomas: Back to the Wellbeing of Future Generations Bill – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘On 24 March 2020, the Wellbeing of Future Generations Bill 2020 was introduced into the House of Commons, for its first reading, by Caroline Lucas MP. The Bill had been introduced into the House of Lords on 21 October 2019, by Baroness Jenny Jones, on behalf of Lord John Bird (who is best known as the founder of Big Issue). Whilst the Bill is not supported by the Government, it has garnered cross party support, and the Bill’s co-sponsors are drawn from all of the major UK political parties.’

Full Story

UK Constitutional Law Association, 7th April 2020

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

The Coronavirus Act 2020: When Legislation Goes Viral (Part One) – UK Human Rights Blog

‘At this point, it is almost trite to say that we are living through unprecedented events. The global spread of the Coronavirus pandemic poses serious challenges to society. So far, the global death-toll has exceeded 21,000 and life as we know it in the UK has changed dramatically. In response to this crisis the Government has announced drastic measures in order to curb the spread of the virus and to support those who may be affected. Indeed, it seems that Cicero’s famous injunction to let the welfare of the people be the highest law has gained a new relevance in the age of COVID-19.’

Full Story

UK Human Rights Blog, 2nd April 2020

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

The Terrorist Offenders (Restriction of Early Release) Bill – Pump Court Chambers

Posted March 31st, 2020 in bills, chambers articles, early release, news, parole, recidivists, terrorism by sally

‘The Terrorist Offenders (Restriction of Early Release) Bill was introduced into Parliament on the 3rd February 2020, as ‘emergency legislation’ in response to the Streatham Hill terrorist attack that took place on 2nd February 2020. This terrorist incident followed two other attacks by men who had also been convicted of terrorism offences and had recently been released from prison.’

Full Story

Pump Court Chambers, 30th March 2020

Source: www.pumpcourtchambers.com

Theodore Konstadinides and Lee Marsons: Covid-19 and its impact on the constitutional relationship between Government and Parliament. – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘The Coronavirus Act 2020, the UK’s most substantial legislative response to the Covid-19 pandemic, received Royal Assent yesterday after a fast-tracked procedure through both Houses. Indisputably, the pandemic falls within the range of situations under which it is constitutionally acceptable for Bills to be fast-tracked. While there is no corollary between an expedited piece of legislation and a bad piece of legislation, fast-tracking the Coronavirus Bill carries important implications for the constitutional relationship between Government and Parliament. Not least, parliamentarians had limited time to scrutinise legislation containing measures that have been described by the Bingham Centre for the Rule of Law as ‘the most sweeping powers ever taken by the UK Government outside of wartime’. But, in this context, the implications for the balance between Government and Parliament extend beyond the immediate passage of the Act. Therefore, while Tierney and King stressed the dilemma between safeguarding public health and the protection of individual liberties vis-a-vis fast-tracked legislation, the purpose of this post is to outline a number of concerns provoked by this pandemic on the Government-Parliament relationship more broadly, while also making some comments on the Act itself.’

Full Story

UK Constitutional Law Association, 26th March 2020

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

The Coronavirus Act and the Care Act: The Key Points – Coronavirus: Guidance for Lawyers and Businesses

‘The former Coronavirus Bill is now the Coronavirus Act 2020. The bill was not significantly amended in relation to the proposed changes to the Care Act – however, per s.87(2) of the Coronavirus Act, the changes relating to the Care Act will not come into force until further regulations are made to that effect. Arianna Kelly outlines the key points.’

Full Story

Coronavirus: Guidance for Lawyers and Businesses, 26th March 2020

Source: lawinthetimeofcorona.wordpress.com

Government to protect commercial tenants from eviction if they miss rent payments over coronavirus outbreak –

‘Commercial tenants who miss a payment in the next three months because of the coronavirus outbreak will be protected from eviction, the government has announced.’

Full Story

Local Government Lawyer, 24th March 2020

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk