Signature of St Albans (Property) Guernsey Ltd v Wragg [2017] EWHC 2352 (Ch) – Tanfield Chambers

Posted October 20th, 2017 in enforcement, injunctions, news, restrictive covenants by sally

‘The Court determined that restrictive covenants created by two conveyances dating back to 1910 continued to affect the Claimant’s property and were in principle enforceable by injunction by any or all of the Defendants against the Claimant.’

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Tanfield Chambers, 12th October 2017

Source: www.tanfieldchambers.co.uk

Johnson v MoD and date of knowledge in noise-induced hearing loss limitation trials – Zenith Chambers

Posted October 20th, 2017 in limitations, news, noise, personal injuries by sally

‘The decision of the Court of Appeal in Johnson v Ministry of Defence [2013] P.I.Q.R. P7, [2012] E.W.C.A. Civ 1505 provides a potential “knockout blow” for Defendants in noise-induced hearing loss limitation trials where attributability is disputed by the Claimant.’

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Zenith Chambers, 13th October 2017

Source: www.zenithchambers.co.uk

Sparks v Biden [2017] EWHC 1994 (Ch) – Tanfield Chambers

Posted October 20th, 2017 in contracts, news, planning, sale of land, time limits by sally

‘A term would be implied into an option agreement, requiring the purchaser/developer of a plot of land to sell the properties that he had newly constructed, within a reasonable period of time, so held the High Court. The clause was necessary as a matter of business efficacy and without it the option agreement lacked commercial coherence. The Court also deemed the clause to be so obvious that it went without saying. (Marks & Spencer PLC v BNP Paribas Securities Services [2015] UKSC 72; [2016] AC 742 considered).’

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Tanfield Chambers, 12th October 2017

Source: www.tanfieldchambers.co.uk

David Partington discusses: Time Share Mis Selling – An Introduction to Alternative Strategies – Park Square Barristers

Posted October 20th, 2017 in consumer credit, contracts, limitations, misrepresentation, news by sally

‘The standard, if unimaginative, attack on a timeshare contract is an action in breach of contract and claiming or claiming and damages under section 2(1) of the Misrepresentation Act 1967. This is a perfectly logical and valid start, but as I have written before, and will write again, the classic action in misrepresentation is a very cumbersome and formalistic cause of action. It is a construction rooted in Victorian values, and the axiom caveat emptor (buyer beware) is part of its legal DNA. No doubt it worked very well where gentlemen in stove pipe hats were buying and selling new parts for their latest foundry; it also works well when you have purchased a company after a comprehensive due diligence process and there are written representation and accounts to pore over. It is much more difficult to deploy in the modern world where “consumers” (not a concept with which the Victorians would have been comfortable) are being subject to what may loosely but accurately be called “high pressure selling techniques” which employ a mixture of half-truths and psychological exploitation.’

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Park Square Barristers, 18th October 2017

Source: www.parksquarebarristers.co.uk

GDPR – the golden opportunity behind the administrative nightmare – Hardwicke Chambers

Posted October 20th, 2017 in data protection, EC law, news, privacy by sally

‘Olive Cooke. You may not recall her name but you may remember the terrible story of the little old lady driven to take her own life partly as a result of being pursued relentlessly for donations by various charities who had obtained her contact details directly or indirectly.’

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Hardwicke Chambers, 6th October 2017

Source: www.hardwicke.co.uk

Chris Ferguson discusses; Proportionality and Integrity – Park Square Barristers

Posted October 20th, 2017 in care orders, children, fostering, grandparents, news, placement orders, proportionality by sally

‘Not long ago I represented a pair of maternal grandparents in a case in Teesside. They had been closely involved with the family over a period of years, although the mother of the two girls at the heart of the case had moved away (not far) during recent times. The mother had various problems and the father barely featured in the proceedings. A few years back the grandparents had actually taken the older girl under their wing for a while (prior to the birth of her sister) and the girls’ older brother was living with them full time under a court order.’

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Park Square Barristers, 6th October 2017

Source: www.parksquarebarristers.co.uk

Lea v Ward [2017] EWHC 2231 (Ch) – Tanfield Chambers

Posted October 20th, 2017 in damages, interpretation, news, rights of way by sally

‘The High Court held that the most natural reading of a deed granting a right of way “over the track or way” was to limit the right of way to the track that was actually in use at the time of the grant in 1979. The claim concerned the existence, location and in particular, the width of a right of way. The Claimant sought injunctions and damages for interference.’

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Tanfield Chambers, 12th October 2017

Source: www.tanfieldchambers.co.uk

Planning for Infrastructure in Wales – No. 5 Chambers

Posted October 20th, 2017 in devolution, environmental protection, news, planning, Wales by sally

‘The Wales Act 2017 received Royal Assent on 31 January 2017. Some provisions are already in force; others will come into effect in April 2018.’

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No. 5 Chambers, 18th October 2017

Source: www.no5.com

​Lack of secure accommodation – “blood on our hands”? – Zenith Chambers

Posted October 20th, 2017 in care orders, children, news, self-harm by sally

‘It is sometimes necessary for local authorities to seek to place a looked after child in what is called secure accommodation. This is designed to protect them from injuring themselves or others and/or absconding from other types of accommodation and suffering significant harm as a consequence.’

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Zenith Chambers, 18th October 2017

Source: www.zenithchambers.co.uk

Environmental Law News Update – Six Pump Court

Posted October 20th, 2017 in environmental protection, news, penalties, pollution, water by sally

‘In this latest Environmental Law News Update, Christopher Badger and William Upton consider penalties incurred by United Utilities for drinking water contamination, the publication of the Government’s Clean Growth Strategy, and Defra’s annual report on air quality.’

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Six Pump Court, 16th October 2017

Source: www.6pumpcourt.co.uk

No right to assisted death: Conway v Secretary of State for Justice – Cloisters

Posted October 20th, 2017 in assisted suicide, human rights, news by sally

‘In recent years, disabled and terminally ill applicants have brought repeated legal challenges to section 2 of the Suicide Act 1961, which makes it an offence intentionally to do an act capable of encouraging or assisting the suicide or attempted suicide of another. Anna Beale considers Conway v Secretary of State for Justice, the most recent contribution to this difficult and complex area of law.’

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Cloisters, 6th October 2017

Source: www.cloisters.com

Restrictive Covenants – can I build a house in the garden? – Tanfield Chambers

Posted October 20th, 2017 in enforcement, news, public interest, restrictive covenants, sale of land by sally

‘The lure of profit can make the construction of a new house in the back garden a tempting prospect. Surely with the constant cry for new homes, such development should be encouraged? Unfortunately, even if planning permission can be obtained for the construction of a “starter-home” in the grounds, it is not uncommon to find a restrictive covenant registered against the title which prohibits the erection of more than one dwelling-house on the plot. “Nimby” neighbours can be all too keen to rely on such covenants to try and stop the proposed works.’

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Tanfield Chambers, 12th October 2017

Source: www.tanfieldchambers.co.uk

Don’t be late – Hardwicke Chambers

Posted October 20th, 2017 in news by sally

‘Much has been written about the court’s discretion to grant relief from sanctions pursuant to CPR 3.9 over recent years, due to the reformulation of the rule in April 2013 and the landmark Court of Appeal decision in Mitchell MP v News Group Newspapers Ltd [2013]. The strictness of the approach in Mitchell led to an outcry from academics and practitioners, but that has now been allayed by the Court of Appeal in Denton v TH White Ltd [2014].’

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Hardwicke Chambers, 5th October 2017

Source: www.hardwicke.co.uk

Commercial Court Shrinks Scope to Challenge Arbitrations – Hailsham Chambers

Posted October 20th, 2017 in news by sally

‘In the internationally competitive market for arbitrations, there is much talk about which Courts are most “arbitration-friendly”. In a recent judgment Teare J, in the Commercial Court, has crushed speculation that the English Courts might be increasingly sympathetic to challenges to factual findings.’

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Hailsham Chambers, 12th October 2017

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Al-Hijrah School: Gender segregation as direct discrimination and other lessons – Cloisters

Posted October 20th, 2017 in news by sally

‘Rachel Barrett and Siân McKinley consider the recent Court of Appeal judgment on gender segregation, HM Chief Inspector of Education, Children’s Services and Skills v The Interim Executive Board of Al-Hijrah School, and the broader implications for discrimination law.’

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Cloisters, 19th October 2017

Source: www.cloisters.com

The shifting sands of risk management in construction projects – Hardwicke Chambers

Posted October 20th, 2017 in news by sally

‘Construction and engineering projects, whether land-based or marine, are inherently risky. For this reason, parties to construction and engineering contracts manage risk by seeking to allocate responsibility for each different type of risk to a particular party.’

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Hardwicke Chambers, 20th October 2017

Source: www.hardwicke.co.uk

The future approach: Using a preventative injunction to protect green spaces? – Hardwicke Chambers

Posted October 20th, 2017 in news by sally

‘There are few sights more unpleasant when walking in our green and pleasant land than that of human waste i.e. faeces selfishly deposited on the ground without any thought for those that wish to enjoy the beauty of our green spaces. Added to the problem of personal waste, is domestic waste1 and industrial scale fly-tipping from contractors, the general public at large and travellers involved in a commercial waste business (for example, who dump waste such as asbestos, rubble, soil, and other hazardous materials) and you have a major waste issue up and down the country. Indeed, due to the fact that most authorities now charge for the disposal of domestic and business waste, fly tipping is a major problem as people do not want to pay for it to be disposed of properly.2 This is a particular problem for local authorities in the country whose primary responsibility is to ensure the safety of its green spaces for its residents and visitors.’

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Hardwicke Chambers, 16th October 2017

Source: www.hardwicke.co.uk

Employer had no property claim in its emails or their contents: (1) Capita Plc, (2) Capita Property & Infrastructure Ltd v Darch & Others – Blackstone Chambers

Posted October 20th, 2017 in news by sally

‘The High Court held that an employer did not have a claim to property in emails or the contents of emails (not limited to those concerning business matters) that were sent by employees from the employer’s email accounts.’

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Blackstone Chambers, 4th October 2017

Source: www.employeecompetition.com

When must a client be saved from himself? It is all a question of money says the Court of Appeal – Hardwicke Chambers

Posted October 20th, 2017 in news by sally

‘Do solicitors’ duties depend on how much they are paid? Are clients entitled to expect the same level of service from solicitors when they are strapped for cash? In Thomas v HJFS, the Court of Appeal has suggested that the standard of professional duties could be lowered when they are provided at a discount.’

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Hardwicke Chambers, 17th October 2017

Source: www.hardwicke.co.uk

A Guide to using Statistics in Employment and Equality Litigation – Cloisters

Posted October 20th, 2017 in news by sally

‘Numbers can be anathema to many lawyers. Yet statistics are a useful weapon in the litigation armoury. This week the Government released its Race Disparity Audit which provides a wealth of such statistics and is a timely reminder of the role that they can play in litigation. Tom Gillie discusses three recent examples of how statistics can be used to advance successful arguments in employment litigation and broader equality context, for example, in relation to the provision of goods, facilities and services.’

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Cloisters, 12th October 2017

Source: www.cloisters.com