For Black Lives To Matter In The UK, Our Deportation Laws Need Reform – Each Other

Posted September 22nd, 2020 in deportation, detention, human rights, minorities, news, race discrimination, sentencing by sally

‘Black Lives Matter. This was the refrain heard throughout this summer’s protests seeking to condemn and draw attention to disproportionate black deaths in both American and British state custody.’

Full Story

Each Other, 21st September 2020

Source: eachother.org.uk

Coronavirus approach ‘creates risks for the rule of law’ – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted September 21st, 2020 in coronavirus, human rights, news, parliament, rule of law, select committees by sally

‘The government’s approach to the coronavirus is creating risks for the rule of law, politicians have warned in a report looking at the human rights implications of Covid-19.’

Full Story

Law Society's Gazette, 21st September 2020

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

High Court dismisses challenge to conditions at Brook House Immigration Removal Centre – an extended look – EIN Blog

Posted September 10th, 2020 in detention, human rights, immigration, news, religious discrimination by sally

‘In Soltany and Others v SSHD [2020] EWHC 2291 (Admin), the High Court dismissed a challenge to the conditions at Brook House Immigration Removal Centre (IRC), which at the material times in 2017 and 2018, was run by G4S.’

Full Story

EIN Blog, 10th September 2020

Source: www.ein.org.uk

Ensuring the lawfulness of automated facial recognition surveillance in the UK – Oxford Human Rights Hub

‘In R(Bridges) v South Wales Police, the England and Wales Court of Appeal reviewed the lawfulness of the use of live automated facial recognition technology (‘AFR’) by the South Wales Police Force. CCTV camera­­s capture images of the public, which are then compared with digital images of persons on a watchlist.’

Full Story

Oxford Human Rights Hub, 3rd September 2020

Source: ohrh.law.ox.ac.uk

Passports: Foreign law must be proved by expert evidence – EIN Blog

‘Hussein and Another (Status of passports: foreign law) [2020] UKUT 250 (IAC): CMG Ockelton VP has explained that (i) a person who holds a genuine passport, apparently issued to him, and not falsified or altered, has to be regarded as a national of the State that issued the passport, (ii) the burden of proving the contrary lies on the claimant in an asylum case, and (iii) foreign law (including nationality law) is a matter of evidence, to be proved by expert evidence directed specifically to the point in issue. The appellant Mr Hussein, who had permission to appeal, and the applicant Mr Abdulrasool, who was seeking permission to appeal, were father and son who made asylum claims, which were refused. The applicant, who was born in 2000, additionally claimed that he was so dependent on his parents that it would be disproportionate to remove him from the UK. Mr Hussein’s wife and two minor children were included in the appellant’s claim as his dependents. Both men gave their oral evidence in a hearing before FTTJ McAll in January 2020 as did Mr Hussein’s brother. The SSHD was not present and FTTJ McAll considered Mr Hussein’s claimed history in detail. He decided that he was untruthful and concluded that he had fabricated important parts of his account supporting his asylum claim. He decided that Mr Hussein was a national of Tanzania and could be returned there. He disbelieved the asylum claim and concluded that there was no good article 8 reason why he should not leave the UK and return to his country of nationality. Both appeals were dismissed.’

Full Story

EIN Blog, 7th September 2020

Source: www.ein.org.uk

Case Comment: Sutherland v Her Majesty’s Advocate (Scotland) [2020] UKSC 32 – UKSC Blog

Posted September 3rd, 2020 in evidence, human rights, internet, news, privacy, Scotland, sexual offences, Supreme Court by sally

‘In this post, Joanna Clark and Emma Ainsley of CMS discuss the judgment handed down by the UK Supreme Court on 15 July 2020 in a referral from the High Court of Justiciary, the Scottish criminal appeal court, in the matter of Sutherland v Her Majesty’s Advocate [2020] UKSC 32 concerning the admissibility of evidence obtained by so-called “paedophile hunter” groups in criminal trials.’

Full Story

UKSC Blog, 1st September 2020

Source: ukscblog.com

Reforms to UK’s antiquated spying laws published by Law Commission – Law Commission

‘Reform is needed to bring the law into the 21st century and protect the United Kingdom from espionage (spying) and unauthorised disclosures (leaks), according to a report from the Law Commission that has been laid in Parliament today [01 September 2020].’

Press release

Law Commission, 1st September 2020

Source: www.lawcom.gov.uk

Mother sues MoJ over child’s lack of access to father in jails lockdown – The Guardian

Posted September 1st, 2020 in children, families, human rights, news, prisons, telecommunications by sally

‘A mother who fears her 19-month-old child will forget their father if prison visits do not resume soon has begun preliminary legal action against the Ministry of Justice.’

Full Story

The Guardian, 31st August 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

A Force to be Reckoned with by John Bowers QC – Littleton Chambers

Posted September 1st, 2020 in armed forces, homosexuality, human rights, news by sally

‘In his article “A Force to be Reckoned with” for the New Law Journal, John Bowers QC reflects on 20 years since the ground breaking case that lifted the ban on gay men and women serving in the military. John acted for one of the applicants in this case, alongside David Pannick QC, Laura Cox, the late Peter Duffy and others.’

Full Story

Littleton Chambers, 20th August 2020

Source: littletonchambers.com

Why Media Diversity Is A Human Rights Issue – Each Other

Posted August 25th, 2020 in diversity, human rights, media, news by sally

‘”How do we increase the number of non-white, disabled, female, or otherwise underrepresented, people working in journalism?” That is the way discussions around media diversity are framed all too often. People might also talk about “changing the gatekeepers” of key media organisations. Both of these things are important, but it is not why I campaign for increased media diversity and better representation.’

Full Story

Each Other, 24th August 2020

Source: eachother.org.uk

Public Inquiries and Survivors: an in-depth look at the JR challenge to the Manchester Arena Inquiry – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted August 18th, 2020 in human rights, inquests, inquiries, judicial review, news, terrorism, victims by sally

‘A recent decision of the High Court concerning the Manchester Arena Inquiry highlights an interesting question about public inquiries, the role of survivors and the protections offered by the European Convention.’

Full Story

UK Human Rights Blog, 17th August 2020

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Successful TOEIC appellants to be granted 2.5 years Leave to Remain – Garden Court Chambers

‘The Home Office has agreed that any TOEIC appellants who succeed in their appeals on Article 8 grounds, should be granted 2.5 years leave to remain.’

Full Story

Garden Court Chambers, 4th August 2020

Source: www.gardencourtchambers.co.uk

Facial Recognition Technology not “In Accordance with Law” – UK Human Rights Blog

‘The Court of Appeal, overturning a Divisional Court decision, has found the use of a facial recognition surveillance tool used by South Wales Police to be in breach of Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR). The case was brought by Liberty on behalf of privacy and civil liberties campaigner Ed Bridges. The appeal was upheld on the basis that the interference with Article 8 of the ECHR, which guarantees a right to privacy and family life, was not “in accordance with law” due to an insufficient legal framework. However, the court found that, had it been in accordance with law, the interference caused by the use of facial recognition technology would not have been disproportionate to the goal of preventing crime. The court also found that Data Protection Impact Assessment (DPIA) was deficient, and that the South Wales Police (SWP), who operated the technology, had not fulfilled their Public Sector Equality Duty.’

Full Story

UK Human Rights Blog, 13th August 2020

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Police’s Automated Facial Recognition Deployments Ruled Unlawful by the Court of Appeal – Doughty Street Chambers

‘R. (Bridges) v Chief Constable of South Wales [2020] EWCA Civ 1058 [2020] 8 WLUK 64 is thought to be the first case in the world to consider the use of facial recognition technology by law enforcement agencies. In this short article, we explore the judgment and its implications for the deployment of these and similar technologies in future.’

Full Story

Doughty Street Chambers, 12th August 2020

Source: insights.doughtystreet.co.uk

Let’s face it: use of automated facial recognition technology by the police – UK Police Law Blog

‘The case of R (Bridges) v Chief Constable of South Wales Police & Information Commissioner [2020] EWCA Civ 1058 (handed down on 11 August 2020) was an appeal from what is said to have been the first claim brought before a court anywhere on planet earth concerning the use by police of automated facial recognition (“AFR”) technology. There could be nothing wrong with posting scores of police officers with eidetic memories to look out for up to a 800 wanted persons at public gatherings. So why not use a powerful computer, capable of matching 50 faces a second with a database of (under) 800 suspects, to do this job much more cheaply and instantaneously, flagging any matches to a human operator for final assessment? According to the Court of Appeal in Bridges, this system constitutes an interference with Article 8 rights which is not such as is in accordance with the law, but which (critically) would be proportionate if a sufficiently narrow local policy were framed.’

Full Story

UK Police Law Blog, 11th August 2020

Source: ukpolicelawblog.com

South Wales police lose landmark facial recognition case – The Guardian

‘Campaigners are calling for South Wales police and other forces to stop using facial recognition technology after the court of appeal ruled that its use breached privacy rights and broke equalities law.’

Full Story

The Guardian, 11th August 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Novichok inquest to examine possible responsibility of Russian state for the death of Dawn Sturgess – 2 Hare Court

‘The poisoning of the former Russian double agent, Sergei Skripal, and his daughter Yulia in Salisbury in March 2018 was a truly shocking event. It was another throwback to the Cold War with the nerve agent, Novichok, playing the deadly role assumed by radioactive polonium in the 2006 assassination of Alexander Litvinenko in London.’

Full Story

2 Hare Court, 6th August 2020

Source: www.2harecourt.com

My Data Went to the Caribbean. Jamaica? No, It Went of its Own Accord – Panopticon

Posted August 11th, 2020 in appeals, data protection, deportation, human rights, immigration, news by sally

‘You have to admire the ingenuity of lawyers. Who would have thought that the GDPR could be a tool to try and force the Home Office to allow a deported overstayer with a lengthy criminal record back into the UK to conduct an in-person appeal? Not the Court of Appeal for a start in Johnson v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2020] EWCA Civ 1032.’

Full Story

Panopticon, 11th August 2020

Source: panopticonblog.com

Newman v Southampton CC: child, mother, journalist – whose rights win out? – Panopticon

‘The High Court handed down judgment on Friday in Newman v Southampton City Council & Ors [2020] EWHC 2103 (Fam), the first recorded judgment concerning journalistic access to the court file in public law family proceedings. The case is likely to be of interest to media lawyers generally, and throws up potential complications surrounding the scope and extent of the privacy rights of children vis-à-vis their parents.’

Full Story

Panopticon, 7th August 2020

Source: panopticonblog.com

Government announces independent review of judicial review – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted August 7th, 2020 in government departments, human rights, judicial review, news, parliament by sally

‘On 31 July 2020 the Government launched an independent review to examine whether there is a need to reform the judicial review process in the UK. The terms of reference of the review are available here. The review follows pledges in the Conservative manifesto to ensure judicial review is “not abused to conduct politics by another means or to create endless delays”. The terms of reference make it clear that the review aims to consider whether judicial review has encroached too far into the work of the executive branch of government.’

Full Story

Law Society's Gazette, 6th August 2020

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk