Immigration removal and an Article 2 inquest – UK Human Rights Blog

‘R (Lawal) v Secretary of State for the Home Department (2021), Upper Tribunal (Immigration and Asylum Chamber), Unreported, JR/626/2020 (V).
The death of an immigration detainee, as with all prisoners, is rightly subject to legal scrutiny. This is because detainees are completely under the state’s control. Article 2 ECHR requires that the state carry out an effective investigation into all deaths in detention where there is a reasonable suspicion that the death was unnatural. A coroner is required to hold an inquest into all deaths in custody, and specifically a jury inquest where there is reason to suspect the death is violent or unnatural. In this case, a two-judge panel of the Upper Tribunal (President of the Upper Tribunal, Mr Justice Lane, and Upper Tribunal Judge Canavan) found that the respondent Home Secretary had breached her Article 2 procedural obligations in respect of deaths in immigration detention. In particular, she had failed to ensure that crucial witness evidence was secured for use at an inquest and had failed to halt the deportation of a relevant witness.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 29th April 2021

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Anti-protest curbs in UK policing bill ‘violate international rights standards’ – The Guardian

‘Anti-protest curbs contained in the new policing bill are disproportionate, hand subjective powers to officers and the home secretary, and violate international human rights standards, MPs and peers have been told.’

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The Guardian, 28th April 2021

Source: www.theguardian.com

Private Prisons Have Shown A Lax Approach To Human Rights – Each Other

Posted April 27th, 2021 in contracting out, human rights, news, prisons by sally

‘Private prisons may seem like an American phenomenon, but, statistically, UK prisoners are more likely to be held in one.’

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Each Other, 26th April 2021

Source: eachother.org.uk

Tim Sayer: Preserving Judicial Oversight: An Appeal to Self-Interest – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘Boris Johnson’s government takes the view that ours is a time of judicial overreach, necessitating redress in terms of the balance of judicial and executive power. This seems to have been driven by a number of high-profile cases, certain vocal thinktanks which appear to have the ear of government, and a wider constitutional prospectus of enhancing executive power to the detriment of the other branches of state. An endless series of projects and proposals have emerged, designed to remedy the perception of an overmighty judiciary. The Independent Review of Administrative Law, established with a view to curbing the perceived excesses of judicial review, reported recently in relatively tame terms, only to be swiftly followed by a further set of proposals. The Independent Human Rights Act Review potentially paves the way for satiation of long-held Conservative fantasies of amending the Human Rights Act. There are also, if leaks are to be believed, proposals to reform the UK Supreme Court.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 21st April 2021

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

A Traveller’s Way Of Life Could Be Criminalised – Each Other

Posted April 20th, 2021 in bills, human rights, news, police, travellers, young persons by sally

‘The recent Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill has an insidious wording which would criminalise the lives of Travellers up and down the United Kindom.’

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Each Other, 19th April 2021

Source: eachother.org.uk

Mandatory vaccinations for care home workers – a slippery slope? – UK Human Rights Blog

‘Or, as Andrew Neil put it on the Spectator TV News Channel this week, “A Dripping Roast For Lawyers”. To be fair, Neil was referring to the patchwork of mandatory vaccines across the United States. But with the publication yesterday of the Government’s consultation paper on vaccine requirements for all staff deployed in a care home supporting at least one older adult over the age of 65, the debate raging about “vaccine passports” has a real target in its sights. Not only because the government has found some primary legislation that gives it the power to introduce mandatory vaccinations, but also because the proposals are not limited to employees.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 16th April 2021

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Home Office breaching human rights law by failing to investigate detainee deaths, court rules – The Independent

‘The Home Office’s policy for investigating deaths in immigration detention has been found to breach human rights law.’

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The Independent, 15th April 2021

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Part One: The History of Our Human Rights – Each Other

Posted April 8th, 2021 in human rights, legal history, news, United Nations by sally

‘As they evolve and come under scrutiny, what constitutes our human rights in the United Kingdom is hotly contested. The first of a series, this piece takes us through the history of human rights from their formal inception to the present day.’

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Each Other, 7th April 2021

Source: eachother.org.uk

UK’s ‘headlong rush into abandoning human rights’ rebuked by Amnesty – The Guardian

‘Amnesty International has published a stark rebuke of the UK government’s stance on human rights, saying that it is “speeding towards the cliff edge” in its policies on housing and immigration, and criticising its seeming determination to end the legal right for the public to challenge government decisions in court.’

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The Guardian, 7th April 2021

Source: www.theguardian.com

Advertising, religion and Articles 9 & 10 ECHR: Lancashire Festival of Hope – Law & Religion UK

‘In Lancashire Festival of Hope with Franklin Graham Limited v Blackpool Borough Council & Anor [2021] Manchester Cty Ct F00MA124, the Court was asked, in effect, to rule on whether or not a charitable limited company could be regarded as having “human rights” for the purposes of anti-discrimination legislation and the ECHR.’

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Law & Religion UK, 6th April 2021

Source: lawandreligionuk.com

MI5 undercover agent policy held lawful – UK Human Rights Blog

‘In Privacy International & Ors v Secretary of State for Foreign And Commonwealth Affairs & Ors [2021] EWCA Civ 330, the Court of Appeal held that the policy which authorises officers of the Security Service (MI5) to run undercover agents who participate in the commission of criminal offences is lawful.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 26th March 2021

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Watchdog steps in over secrecy about UK women in Syria stripped of citizenship – The Guardian

‘The Home Office’s refusal to disclose the number of women who, like Shamima Begum, have been deprived of their British citizenship after travelling to join Islamic State is under investigation by the information commissioner.’

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The Guardian, 29th March 2021

Source: www.theguardian.com

Florence Powell and Stephanie Needleman: How radical an instrument is Section 3 of the Human Rights Act 1998? – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘The operation of the Human Rights Act 1998 (the “HRA”) is currently being reviewed by the Government’s Independent Human Rights Act Review (the “Review”). One of the Review’s key themes is “the impact of the HRA on the relationship between the judiciary, the executive and the legislature”. In respect of this theme, the Terms of Reference ask how s.3 has operated and whether it should be amended or repealed.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 24th March 2021

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

Does The UK Protect Our Right To Freedom of Religion or Belief? – Each Other

Posted March 24th, 2021 in equality, human rights, news, religious discrimination by sally

‘In 1975, at the height of Cold War tensions, leaders of the United States, Canada and all European countries sat down together in Helsinki, Finland. Their main aim was discuss how to improve relations between different factions of the world when a global armed conflict felt dangerously close.’

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Each Other, 23rd March 2021

Source: eachother.org.uk

Covid: Blind woman forces government action in shielding case – BBC News

‘A blind woman who was sent a shielding letter she could not read has won “promising” commitments from the government after a legal challenge.’

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BBC News, 19th March 2021

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Does a Compulsory Retirement Age Infringe Human Rights Law? – by Hugh Collins – UK Labour Law Blog

‘An employer’s compulsory retirement scheme requires the dismissal of an employee for no other reason than the employee has attained a specified retirement age. The retirement age may be fixed in the terms of the contract of employment, a staff handbook, a collective agreement, or other regulations that determine the rules governing a particular retirement age. Although compulsory retirement used to be lawful, since 2011 the position in the United Kingdom (UK) is that an employee dismissed in accordance with an employer’s policy of a compulsory retirement age can bring a claim either for unfair dismissal under the Employment Rights Act 1996 or (for workers as well as employees) for age discrimination under the Equality Act 2010. Following Seldon v Clarkson Wright & Jakes [2012] UKSC 16, an employer can justify the age discrimination of a compulsory retirement age as a proportionate measure in pursuit of a legitimate aim, such as preserving the promotion prospects of younger staff or the avoidance of intrusive surveillance of the job performance of older staff.’

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UK Labour Law Blog, 17th March 2021

Source: uklabourlawblog.com

Sarah Everard: Court challenge over Clapham vigil ban – BBC News

Posted March 12th, 2021 in coronavirus, demonstrations, human rights, murder, news, women by sally

‘Organisers of a vigil in response to the disappearance of Sarah Everard are going to the High Court after police said gatherings would be “unlawful”.’

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BBC News, 12th March 2021

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Stonehenge, religious manifestation and the ECHR: Halcrow – Law & Religion UK

‘In Halcrow & Ors v Crown Prosecution Service [2021] EWHC 483 (Admin), Maryam Halcrow, Angel Grace and Lisa Mead were Pagans of various traditions. All three had been convicted by Swindon Magistrates’ Court of entering the stone circle at Stonehenge on 4 February 2018 and 6 May 2018 without reasonable excuse, contrary to regulation 3(h) of the Stonehenge Regulations 1997 and s.19 of the Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act 1979, and had been sentenced to a conditional discharge. Their appeal to the Crown Court was dismissed [1 & 2].’

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Law & Religion UK, 11th March 2021

Source: lawandreligionuk.com

Fairness and Adjournments: Guidance from the Court of Appeal – No. 5 Chambers

Posted March 11th, 2021 in adjournment, fraud, health, human rights, news, VAT, witnesses by sally

‘In Bilta (UK) Ltd (in liquidation) & Others v Tradition Financial Services Ltd [2021] EWCA Civ 221 the Court of Appeal examined the principles to be applied when a party seeks an adjournment because a witness is unable to attend the trial due to ill-health.’

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No. 5 Chambers, 4th March 2021

Source: www.no5.com

For Whom the Bell Tolls: “Contract” in the Gig Economy – Oxford Human Rights Hub

‘Are Uber drivers ‘limb (b) workers’ and so entitled to fundamental statutory rights such as the minimum wage and working time protections? In a decision of fundamental significance, six Justices of the United Kingdom Supreme Court (UKSC) upheld the original Employment Tribunal (ET) decision that the drivers were ‘limb (b) workers. In reaching this conclusion, the UKSC endorsed the ‘purposive’ approach that had been set down in the earlier case of Autoclenz v Belcher by Lord Clarke.’

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Oxford Human Rights Hub, 7th March 2021

Source: ohrh.law.ox.ac.uk