Trainee barristers told they will be marked down for wearing short skirts – The Guardian

Posted April 17th, 2018 in barristers, examinations, freedom of expression, news, universities by tracey

‘Trainee barristers are being told they will be docked points in their exams if they wear short skirts, colourful socks or “kinky boots”. A handbook at the BPP university law school warns students that they may lose points if they do not adopt an extremely conservative dress code in their advocacy assessments.’

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The Guardian, 16th April 2018

Source: www.theguardian.com

The Leveson Inquiry Wrapped up Early, So What Does This Mean for Free Speech and Privacy? – RightsInfo

‘The public inquiry into media ethics following the phone-hacking scandal of 2011 will not be concluded in full. Why is this happening, and what does it mean for freedom of speech and our right to privacy?’

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RightsInfo, 4th April 2018

Source: rightsinfo.org

Fluctuating hate crime figures prompt CPS and police to reexamine cases – Law Society’s Gazette

‘The Crown Prosecution Service is working with six police forces to reexamine their hate crime cases to see if the correct decisions were taken following a significant drop in referrals, the director of public prosecutions has revealed.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 7th March 2018

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Paradise Papers legal action against BBC and Guardian condemned – The Guardian

‘Two of the key media partners in the Paradise Papers investigation have condemned the legal action that is seeking to force the Guardian and the BBC to disclose documents used by reporters.’

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The Guardian, 19th December 2017

Source: www.theguardian.com

Twitter suspends Britain First leaders as it enforces new anti-abuse rules – The Guardian

Posted December 19th, 2017 in freedom of expression, incitement, internet, news, violence by sally

‘Twitter has suspended the accounts of the leader and deputy leader of Britain First, a far-right group recently retweeted by Donald Trump, under the terms of its revised anti-abuse rules.’

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The Guardian, 18th December 2017

Source: www.theguardian.com

Privacy and the Princess – Transparency Project

Posted December 13th, 2017 in divorce, freedom of expression, human rights, matrimonial home, news, privacy by sally

‘Once upon a time, His Royal Highness Louis Xavier Marie Guillaume, Prince of Luxembourg, Prince of Nassau and Prince of Bourbon-Parma married Tessy Antony, now Her Royal Highness Tessy Princess of Luxembourg, Princess of Nassau and Princess of Bourbon-Parma. Unfortunately, they did not live happily ever after, as, after 11 years of marriage and two children, they are now divorcing in the High Court in London.’

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Transparency Project, 11th December 2017

Source: www.transparencyproject.org.uk

Jailed Whistle-Blower in Plea for Press Freedoms as Supporters Launch Crowdfunding Campaign – Garden Court Chambers

‘A prison officer who lost his freedom, home and livelihood after being jailed for exposing dangerous and life-threatening failures and cutbacks in the British prison system has spoken out over the “chilling effect” that his case has had on press freedoms in the UK.’

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Garden Court Chambers, 23rd November 2017

Source: www.gardencourtchambers.co.uk

The data protection bill is yet another legal threat to UK press freedom – The Guardian

‘Proposals to allow the information commissioner to assess journalists’ use of private information before publication could let the powerful off the hook.’

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The Guardian, 3rd December 2017

Source: www.theguardian.com

The limits of protest and free speech – Legal Action

Posted November 23rd, 2017 in abortion, demonstrations, freedom of expression, harassment, news, public order by sally

‘Steve Hynes discusses the controversy surrounding anti-abortion protests outside an abortion clinic in west London and its possible implications for human rights law.’

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Legal Action, November 2017

Source: www.lag.org.uk

Autumn Newsletter – Falcon Chambers

– Prescriptive easements – a glass half-full: out with the negative; in with the positive 10

– Keeping the Title Clean: Unwanted Notices and Restrictions 12

– Estoppel in Pre-Contractual Negotiations 15

– The Curse of the Freebie 17

– Voidable and no Mistake 20

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Falcon Chambers, November 2017

Source: www.falcon-chambers.com

Social work, controversial views and fitness to practise: Ngole – Law & Religion UK

‘Felix Ngole, a second-year Master’s student on a social work course at Sheffield University, had been excluded from the course by the Faculty of Social Sciences Fitness to Practise [“FTP”] Committee after comments he posted on Facebook about his personal opposition to same-sex marriage. Before the Administrative Court, he argued that fitness to practise was a matter for the professional social work bodies rather than for the University. In R (Ngole) v University of Sheffield [2017] EWHC 2669 (Admin), however, Rowena Collins Rice, sitting as a Deputy High Court Judge, rejected his claim.’

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Law & Religion UK, 2nd November 2017

Source: www.lawandreligionuk.com

Muslim father ‘ordered’ by judge not to impose Islam on his children – The Independent

Posted November 2nd, 2017 in care orders, children, families, freedom of expression, Islam, news by tracey

‘A Muslim father whose three children are being cared for by a Christian foster family was told by a judge he must not “pressure” them about Islam.’

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The Independent, 1st November 2017

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Judge backs University of Sheffield in homosexuality comments row – BBC News

‘A university’s decision to expel a student for posting a comment online saying homosexuality was a sin was lawful, a court has ruled.’

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BBC News, 27th October 2017

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

UK government considers classifying Google and Facebook as publishers – The Guardian

Posted October 12th, 2017 in freedom of expression, intellectual property, internet, media, news, publishing by sally

‘Karen Bradley, the culture secretary, has said the government is considering changing the legal status of Google, Facebook and other internet companies amid growing concerns about copyright infringement and the spread of extremist material online.’

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The Guardian, 11th October 2017

Source: www.theguardian.com

Landmark appeal judgment dents libel threshold hopes – Law Society’s Gazette

‘A Court of Appeal ruling has dealt a blow to hopes that the 2013 Defamation Act would raise the bar to libel actions in England and Wales courts. In Bruno Lachaux v Independent Print Limited and Evening Standard Limited, and Bruno Lachaux v AOL (UK) Limited, the court dismissed an appeal by publishers against a High Court finding that a French national living in Dubai had been caused “serious harm” by the publication of allegations by his former wife.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 12th September 2017

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Police in Aberaeron investigate carnival float ‘considered racist’ – The Guardian

Posted August 31st, 2017 in artistic works, complaints, freedom of expression, news, racism, Wales by tracey

‘Police are investigating allegations of racism against a group of men who wore black face paint when they dressed as members of the Jamaican bobsleigh team for a carnival parade.’

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The Guardian, 30th August 2017

Source: www.theguardian.com

Palestinian cartoonist’s 1987 murder reinvestigated – BBC News

Posted August 29th, 2017 in freedom of expression, murder, news by tracey

‘The murder of a Palestinian cartoonist who was shot dead in the street is being reinvestigated 30 years on.’

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BBC News, 29th August 2017

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Discrimination Update – 11KBW

‘Almost everyone has an immediate intuitive understanding of direct discrimination. That is not to say that there are no difficult cases, but the core concept is easily grasped. Imagine an employer with an express policy of refusing to employ women. In a case of that sort the discrimination is obvious. To use the language of Equality Act 2010, s. 13, the employer treats women less favourably because of their sex. The reason for the simplicity of direct discrimination is that it usually needs no context for the discriminatory impact of the criterion to be apparent. The criterion is inherently discriminatory.’

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11KBW, 10th August 2017

Source: www.11kbw.com

‘Worrying trend’ of freedom of the press in the UK as country ranks 40 in latest Reporters Without Borders index – The Independent

Posted August 15th, 2017 in freedom of expression, media, news, reports by sally

‘A “heavy handed approach” often in the name of national security has seen the UK slip in the rankings of countries with the world’s freest press, according to a new report by Reporters Without Borders.’

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The Independent, 14th August 2017

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Publishing salacious material as public interest besmirches press freedom – The Guardian

‘Seedy legal plea to name couple filmed having sex by police officer Adrian Pogmore is anything but a matter of high principle.’

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The Guardian, 13th August 2017

Source: www.theguardian.com