The Online Safety Bill Part 2: Do these proposals go too far, leading to overzealous policing? – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted September 13th, 2021 in bills, freedom of expression, human rights, internet, news, police by tracey

‘This post is the second part of two posts on the draft Online Safety Bill. In my first post, here, I detailed the mechanics of the proposed bill in detail. This post will summarise some of the civil society responses since the publication of the draft bill, attempting an evaluation of how reasonable those responses are in light of the available information.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 11th September 2021

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Misconduct in public office – ECtHR reviews foreseeability of common law offence – UK Human Rights Blog

‘On 6 July 2021 the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) published its judgment in the case of Norman v UK (Application no. 41387/17). The case concerned Mr Robert Norman, an officer at Belmarsh prison, who in 2015 was convicted of misconduct in public office for passing a variety of information to a tabloid journalist in exchange for money. The ECtHR found that, in Mr Norman’s case, the offence itself did not constitute a breach of Article 7 ECHR (no punishment without law): Mr Norman’s conduct was sufficiently serious for it to have been foreseeable that it would constitute a criminal offence. The ECtHR also found that the newspaper’s disclosure of Mr Norman’s activities to the police, and his subsequent prosecution and conviction, did not breach his rights under Article 10 ECtHR (freedom of expression).’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 6th September 2021

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Ofcom clears ITV over Piers Morgan’s Meghan comments on Good Morning Britain – BBC News

Posted September 2nd, 2021 in complaints, freedom of expression, media, news, royal family by sally

‘ITV has been cleared by media regulator Ofcom, which has rejected a record 58,000 complaints about Piers Morgan’s criticism of the Duchess of Sussex.’

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BBC News, 1st September 2021

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Barrister fined for tweet that “could promote hostility towards Muslims” – Legal Futures

‘A barrister at the centre of a storm of outrage over tweets he published earlier this year has been fined and warned over one tweet that was offensive and “could promote hostility towards Muslims”.’

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Legal Futures, 26th August 2021

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

The police bill is not about law and order – it’s about state control – The Guardian

‘Tucked away in the government’s 300-page police, crime, sentencing and courts bill, are various clauses which will have serious implications for the right to protest. The bill seeks to quietly criminalise “serious annoyance”, increase police powers to restrict protests, and give the home secretary discretion over what types of protests are allowed.’

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The Guardian, 9th August 2021

Source: www.theguardian.com

Prosecutors review Extinction Rebellion cases as third protester in three days has conviction quashed – The Independent

‘Prosecutors are reviewing numerous Extinction Rebellion cases after a third protester in as many days had their conviction quashed.’

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The Independent, 5th August 2021

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Regulating content on user-to user and search service providers – UK Human Rights Blog

‘The dust has settled since the government released its draft Online Safety Bill. Now is therefore a good time to evaluate its aims, methods, and potential impacts, which we will do so in this two-part post. The first post will have a look at the overall architecture of the bill, discussing what it is trying to do and how it is trying to do it. The second post will survey responses to the bill from academics and civil society campaigners, discussing whether the bill does too much or not enough.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 2nd August 2021

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Council and bus operator to pay out £109k in damages and costs to religious organisation over refusal to advertise rally – Local Government Lawyer

‘Blackpool Council and its wholly owned company Blackpool Transport Services have been ordered to pay £109,000 in damages and costs to a religious organisation run by evangelist Franklin Graham after refusing to advertise a rally on buses.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 21st July 2021

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Retired solicitor sees off harassment claim over ‘puerile’ blog – Law Society’s Gazette

‘A retired solicitor’s “abrasive” and “frequently puerile” blog posts are entitled to the same level of protection as mainstream journalism, a High Court judge has ruled, striking out a harassment claim brought by a local government officer.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 19th July 2021

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Reporting restrictions in end of life cases: anonymity for treating clinicians – UK Human Rights Blog

‘The focus of this judgment was on the jurisdiction, if any, that the High Court Family Division has to maintain a Reporting Restriction Order (‘RRO’) prohibiting the naming of any medical clinicians as being involved in the care and treatment of a child who had been the subject of “end of life” proceedings before the High Court prior to their death, and where an RRO had been made at that time preventing the identification of any of the treating clinicians and staff until further order.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 6th July 2021

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Forstater v CGD Europe: when is a belief worthy of respect in a democratic society? – Parklane Plowden Chambers

‘Choudhry J’s judgment in Maya Forstater v CGD Europe is well-reasoned and clear, and repays reading in full for anyone interested in the difficult interplay between the rights of those with conflicting protected characteristics.’

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Parklane Plowden Chambers, 29th June 2021

Source: www.parklaneplowden.co.uk

Supreme Court backs protesters and rules blocking roads can be ‘lawful’ way to demonstrate – The Independent

‘The Supreme Court has ruled that protests can be a “lawful excuse” to block roads, as the government pushes for new laws to limit peaceful demonstrations. Britain’s most senior judges said it was right to acquit a group of protesters who blockaded the Defence and Security Equipment International (DSEI) arms fair in London in 2017.’

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The Independent, 26th June 2021

Source: www.independent.co.uk

UK introducing three laws that threaten human rights, says UN expert – The Guardian

‘Boris Johnson’s government is introducing three pieces of legislation that will make human rights violations more likely to occur and less likely to be sanctioned even as averting climate catastrophe depends on these rights, the UN special rapporteur for human rights and the environment has said.’

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The Guardian, 24th June 2021

Source: www.theguardian.com

News Woman wins appeal against losing job for tweets about transgender people – The Independent

‘A woman who lost her job after tweeting that men cannot change their biological sex has won her appeal against an employment tribunal.’

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The Independent, 10th June 2021

Source: www.independent.co.uk

GCHQ’s mass data interception violated right to privacy, court rules – The Guardian

‘The UK spy agency GCHQ’s methods for bulk interception of online communications violated the right to privacy and the regime for collection of data was unlawful, the grand chamber of the European court of human rights has ruled.’

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The Guardian, 25th May 2021

Source: www.theguardian.com

Online safety bill: a messy new minefield in the culture wars – The Guardian

Posted May 13th, 2021 in bills, freedom of expression, internet, news by sally

‘Moderation of online content is difficult. Social networks want to take down content that breaks their rules. They have to do it quickly enough that they do not get shouted at for leaving bad things up, but they have to do it accurately so that they do not get shouted at for taking the wrong things down.’

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The Guardian, 12th May 2021

Source: www.theguardian.com

Campus free speech law in England ‘likely to have opposite effect’ – The Guardian

Posted May 13th, 2021 in bills, freedom of expression, news, universities by sally

‘A controversial bill forcing universities in England to promote free speech has been attacked by freedom of expression campaigners, who say the legislation is more likely to have the opposite effect.’

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The Guardian, 12th May 2021

Source: www.theguardian.com

Universities could face fines over free speech breaches – BBC News

‘Universities in England could face fines under new legislation if they fail to protect free speech on campus.’

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BBC News, 12th May 2021

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

If the government cares about freedom of expression, why is it passing the police and crime bill? – Kirsty Brimelow – The Guardian

Posted April 6th, 2021 in bills, demonstrations, freedom of expression, news, police by sally

‘The new legislation would crush the principle of policing by consent in the UK and stifle democratic change.’

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The Guardian, 5th April 2021

Source: www.theguardian.com

Civil liberties groups call police plans for demos an ‘assault’ on right to protest – The Guardian

Posted March 11th, 2021 in bills, demonstrations, freedom of expression, news, police, reports by sally

‘Civil liberties campaigners have warned of a “staggering assault” on the right to protest, as police detailed how they would enforce controversial government proposals to restrict demonstrations.’

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The Guardian, 11th March 2021

Source: www.theguardian.com