Assange cannot be extradited, but free speech arguments dismissed — an extended look – UK Human Rights Blog

‘In The Government of the United States v Julian Assange (2021), the District Judge sitting at Westminster Magistrates’ Court discharged the American extradition request against the founder of WikiLeaks because there is a substantial risk that he would commit suicide. Given Julian Assange’s political notoriety as an avowed whistle-blower, however, the judgment is significant for its dismissal of the defence’s free speech arguments. This article analyses why these human rights submissions were unsuccessful.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 21st January 2021

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Depp’s Defeat: A Human Rights Victory – Each Other

Posted November 17th, 2020 in defamation, domestic violence, freedom of expression, human rights, news, victims by sally

‘‘Trial by media’ is often touted as a crude alternative to our legal system. But in losing his libel action against The Sun, Johnny Depp’s court battle backfired. It’s a resounding win for press freedom – and for domestic abuse survivors.’

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Each Other, 16th November 2020

Source: eachother.org.uk

UK lawyers uneasy about plan to prosecute hate speech at home – The Guardian

Posted November 5th, 2020 in freedom of expression, hate crime, Law Commission, news, privacy, prosecutions by tracey

‘Proposals to prosecute individuals for hate crimes based on what they discuss in their own homes need to be more widely debated, free speech organisations have said.’

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The Guardian, 4th November 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Coronavirus: Priti Patel bans demonstrations during England’s lockdown – The Independent

‘Demonstrations of more than two people are to be banned during the month-long lockdown in England, after ministers removed an exemption that has allowed protests to take place in recent months.’

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The Independent,3rd November 2020

Source: www.independent.co.uk

US evangelical group takes legal action against UK venues – The Guardian

Posted October 27th, 2020 in contracts, freedom of expression, news, religious discrimination by sally

‘A conservative US evangelical organisation is taking legal action against UK entertainment venues that cancelled appearances by Franklin Graham, a preacher who has expressed homophobic and Islamophobic views, earlier this year.’

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The Guardian, 27th October 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Reforms to UK’s antiquated spying laws published by Law Commission – Law Commission

‘Reform is needed to bring the law into the 21st century and protect the United Kingdom from espionage (spying) and unauthorised disclosures (leaks), according to a report from the Law Commission that has been laid in Parliament today [01 September 2020].’

Press release

Law Commission, 1st September 2020

Source: www.lawcom.gov.uk

Equal Pay, Parental Rights, Personal Beliefs and Protest Movements – a review of recent developments in the areas of sport and employment law – Littleton Chambers

‘Across the board people have been reassessing how the traditional views of what it means to be an “employee” fit within our modern world.’

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Littleton Chambers, 21st July 2020

Source: littletonchambers.com

A Guide to Protestor Rights Balanced Against Police Powers – St Pauls Chambers

‘Article 10 of the Human Rights Act 1998 enshrines the right to the freedom of expression and Article 11 establishes the right of freedom of assembly and association. However, these rights are qualified, meaning that, in certain circumstances, these rights can be interfered with. The interference with these rights must be proportionate and necessary in the pursuit of a legitimate aim. For example, protestor rights to freedom of expression and freedom of assembly may be compromised where this is necessary in order to ensure public safety, prevent crime or disorder, protect the rights of others, or national security.’

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St Pauls Chambers, 18th July 2020

Source: www.stpaulschambers.com

COVID-19 and the Right to Protest – St John’s Buildings

‘Criminal barrister Rebecca Penfold has co-authored an article with Aparna Rao of 5 Paper Buildings about Covid-19 and the right to protest. It asks what rights do individual citizens have to protest, whilst subject to lockdown restrictions in England?’

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St John's Buildings, 3rd June 2020

Source: stjohnsbuildings.com

Coronavirus: Are protests legal amid lockdown? – BBC News

‘Solidarity protests against the death of George Floyd in the US are continuing to take place in the UK – but are they actually legal given the coronavirus lockdown?’

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BBC News, 3rd June 2020

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

ZXC v Bloomberg: privacy expectations about criminal investigations – Panopticon

‘The Court of Appeal has today given judgment in the long-running ZXC v Bloomberg litigation ([2020] EWCA Civ 611). The key points:

1. In general, a person does have a reasonable expectation of privacy about the fact that/details of their being subject to a police investigation, up to the point of charge.
2. Reporting about alleged conduct is different from reporting about a criminal investigation into that conduct.’

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Panopticon, 15th May 2020

Source: panopticonblog.com

Court upholds ban on anti-abortion poster targeting Stella Creasy – The Guardian

Posted May 7th, 2020 in abortion, freedom of expression, human rights, local government, news by sally

‘An anti-abortion campaigner who is banned from displaying a poster featuring an image of a dead foetus alongside a picture of the Labour MP Stella Creasy has failed to overturn a council order against him.’

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The Guardian, 6th May 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Woman’s attraction to chandeliers not a sexual orientation, Ipso says – The Guardian

‘A woman in a long-term relationship with a 92-year-old German chandelier has been told that her attraction to historic light fittings is not considered to be a protected sexual orientation.’

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The Guardian, 14th April 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Arron Banks fails in effort to use human rights laws to avoid £162,000 tax bill – The Guardian

‘Arron Banks, the businessman and Ukip party donor, has failed in his attempt to use human rights laws to dismiss a £162,000 tax bill.’

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The Guardian, 2nd April 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Barrister fails in appeal over “seriously offensive” tweet – Legal Futures

‘The High Court has upheld the reprimand and fine issued to a barrister who sent a “seriously offensive” tweet in a private capacity that was “racially charged and derogatory to women”.’

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Legal Futures, 2nd March 2020

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

A “Cardinal Democratic Freedom”: High Court rules police’s action “Orwellian” in a victory for freedom of expression – Monckton Chambers

‘On 14 February 2020, the High Court (Mr Justice Julian Knowles) held that Humberside Police had disproportionately interfered with the rights of free speech of the Claimant, Harry Miller, under Article 10 of the European Convention on Human Rights (“ECHR”).’

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Monckton Chambers, 21st February 2020

Source: www.monckton.com

Twitter, trans rights and the role of the police — an extended look – – UK Human Rights Blog

‘The case of R (Miller) v The College of Policing & The Chief Constable of Humberside [2020] EWHC 225 (Admin) is yet another decision arising out of an individual’s use of Twitter to share transphobic, or as they see it “gender critical”, views.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 21st February 2020

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Of Tweeting and Transgender Rights – Panopticon Blog

‘Over the years, Panopticon has discussed a number of cases about the powers of the police to record, retain, and disseminate information about individuals. The judgment of Mr. Justice Julian Knowles in R (ota Harry Miller) v (1) The College of Policing, and (2) The Chief Constable of Humberside [2020] EWHC 225 (Admin) is a significant contribution to the law in this area. In Panopticon terms the case is unusual, in that the issues are discussed by reference to the right to freedom of expression under Article 10 of the European Convention on Human Rights (“ECHR”), rather than by reference to Article 8 or data protection legislation.’

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Panopticon Blog, 17th February 2020

Source: panopticonblog.com

Police who warned man about ‘transphobic’ tweet acted unlawfully – The Guardian

Posted February 17th, 2020 in freedom of expression, hate crime, internet, news, police, transgender persons by sally

‘Police officers unlawfully interfered with a man’s right to freedom of expression by turning up at his place of work to speak to him about allegedly “transphobic” tweets, the high court has ruled.’

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The Guardian, 14th February 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Twitter will label and may remove media designed to mislead – The Guardian

‘Twitter will begin to label and in some cases remove doctored or manipulated photos, audio and videos that are designed to mislead people.’

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The Guardian, 5th February 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com