Court of Appeal to hear facial recognition technology challenge – Law Society’s Gazette

‘A Cardiff resident who lost a High Court challenge over police deployment of automated facial recognition technology has been given permission to take his case to the Court of Appeal.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 20th November 2019

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Extinction Rebellion protest: Met accused of 521 abuses of power – The Guardian

‘Police carried out widespread abuses of power during Extinction Rebellion’s two weeks of protests in October, according to investigators who have collated dozens of reports from protesters.’

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The Guardian, 20th November 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

Transphobia guidelines ‘contrary to freedom of expression’, court hears – BBC News

‘The way police record “non-crime hate incidents” against transgender people has “a chilling effect” on freedom of expression, the High Court has heard.he way police record “non-crime hate incidents” against transgender people has “a chilling effect” on freedom of expression, the High Court has heard.’

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BBC News, 20th November 2019

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Social media posts referred to police could show up on DBS background checks despite not being a crime – Daily Telegraph

‘Social media posts referred to police but deemed as non-criminal could still show up on DBS background checks.’

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Daily Telegraph, 19th November2019

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Fracking: How The Police Response Is Threatening The Right To Protest – Rights Info

‘The UK government has announced an immediate moratorium on fracking. The decision came after new scientific analysis concluded it was not possible to “rule out future unacceptable impacts”.’

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Rights Info, 11th November 2019

Source: rightsinfo.org

Media and Defamation Law – The Pupillage Podcast

Posted November 6th, 2019 in defamation, freedom of expression, injunctions, media, news, privacy by sally

‘The recent announcement by the Duke and Duchess of Sussex — aka Harry and Meghan — that they are planning to sue Associated Newspapers after the Mail on Sunday published a private letter from Meghan to her father, has put the spotlight on media and defamation law – the topic of this episode of the pupillage podcast. We hear about celebrities and super injunctions, but also learn that nothing is beyond the reach of this fascinating area of law, from anti-semitism, to medical research, to the parish newsletter. If you’re interested in the conflict between free speech and privacy, and in truth and opinion then this episode is for you.’

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The Pupillage Podcast, October 2019

Source: soundcloud.com

From contract to role: using human rights to widen the personal scope of employment protections – Oxford Human Rights Hub

‘The UK Supreme Court’s judgment in Gilham demonstrates how human rights can be used to widen the class of individuals who benefit from employment rights (the “personal scope” of the rights). Further, the court’s reasoning evidences a shift away from contractual thinking in labour law.’

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Oxford Human Rights Hub, 1st November 2019

Source: ohrh.law.ox.ac.uk

First arrest and prosecution for praying in public case collapses after bungled police investigation – Daily Telegraph

‘The country’s first arrest and prosecution for praying in public has collapsed following a bungling police investigation.’

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Daily Telegraph, 31st October 2019

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

John Bowers QC’s Employment Law Blog: October 2019 – Littleton Chambers

Posted October 31st, 2019 in adoption, charities, equality, freedom of expression, homosexuality, housing, Judaism, news by sally

‘In R (ota Z) v LB of Hackney & Agudas Israel Housing Assoc Ltd [2019] EWCA Civ 1099, the court considered a challenge to the housing policies of a charitable provider of social housing in Hackney. Accommodation was allocated by the Housing Association only to members of the Orthodox Jewish community in the Stamford Hill area of London. The Divisional Court found that ‘there are very high levels of poverty and deprivation [amongst the Orthodox community], with associated low levels of home ownership … there is a strong correlation between the evidenced poverty and deprivation and the religion’. It also found that the arrangements for allocating housing which placed Orthodox Jews in a primary position to enable them both to avoid the disadvantages and to meet the needs. This would be unlawful discrimination under the Equality Act 2010 unless there was an appropriate exception.’

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Littleton Chambers, 21st October 2019

Source: www.littletonchambers.com

Gilham v Ministry of Justice [2019] UKSC 44 – Old Square Chambers

‘In Gilham v MOJ the Supreme Court considered the novel question whether judges are workers for the purposes of the protection against whistle blowing detriment in the Employment Rights Act 1996.’

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Old Square Chambers, 16th October 2019

Source: www.oldsquare.co.uk

Is There A Point In Banning Drill Rappers Using Certain Words? – Rights Info

‘“Bandoe”, “Booj”, “trapping” and “Kitty”. These are a few of the words drill rapper Ervine Kimpalu has been banned from using in his music for five years after being imprisoned on drug dealing charges. It has sparked renewed debate over the role the music genre plays in serious youth violence. So, how is it that a person can be prevented from using certain words? And is there any point? RightsInfo explores.’

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Rights Info, 24th October 2019

Source: rightsinfo.org

Drill rapper Rico Racks jailed and banned from rapping certain words – The Guardian

Posted October 21st, 2019 in artistic works, drug offences, freedom of expression, news, sentencing by sally

‘Rico Racks, a London drill rapper, has been jailed for three years for drug offences and issued with an order that forbids him from rapping certain words.’

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The Guardian, 21st October 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

Whistleblowing judges: protected by human rights? – UK Human Rights Blog

‘The UK Supreme Court has unanimously granted an appeal by a district judge against the Court of Appeal’s decision that she did not qualify as a “worker” under the Employment Rights Act 1996 (the “1996 Act”), and therefore could not benefit from the whistleblowing protections it conferred.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 18th October 2019

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Extinction Rebellion London Ban: What Is A Section 14 Order And Is It Lawful? – Rights Info

‘Police have banned climate campaigners Extinction Rebellion (XR) from protesting in London, a move that human rights groups have condemned as “chilling”. What power does the police have to do this, and is it lawful? RightsInfo explores.’

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Rights Info, 15th October 2019

Source: rightsinfo.org

Ben Stokes takes legal action against Sun over story of family tragedy – The Guardian

Posted October 11th, 2019 in families, freedom of expression, media, news, privacy, sport by tracey

‘Ben Stokes and his mother, Deborah, have launched legal action against the Sun for invasion of privacy, after the newspaper last month published a front-page story detailing a tragedy involving the England cricketer’s family.’

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The Guardian, 10th October 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

Case Preview: Gilham v Ministry of Justice Part Two – UKSC Blog

‘Ms Gilham appealed on all three grounds. She also appears to raise the distinct but related question whether she can bring her claim as a ‘Crown employee’ within the meaning of the ERA, s191.’

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UKSC Blog, 9th October 2019

Source: ukscblog.com

Case Preview: Gilham v Ministry of Justice Part One – UKSC Blog

‘Claire Gilham is a district judge. She claims that she was subjected to various detriments as a result of making complaints about her judicial workload and the poor management of the courts.’

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UKSC Blog, 9th October 2019

Source: ukscblog.com

Christian doctor who refused to call transgender woman ‘she’ loses employment tribunal – The Independent

‘A doctor who refused to call a transgender woman “she” because of his Christian faith has lost his employment tribunal.’

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The Independent, 3rd October 2019

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Obscenity judge’s copy of Lady Chatterley’s Lover to stay in UK – The Guardian

‘The copy of Lady Chatterley’s Lover used by the judge in the landmark 1960 obscenity trial is to remain in the UK, after the University of Bristol stepped forward to augment the money raised by a crowdfunding campaign backed by writers including Neil Gaiman and Stephen Fry.’

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The Guardian, 1st October 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

Ofcom investigates CGTN over coverage of Hong Kong protests – The Guardian

Posted September 24th, 2019 in China, demonstrations, freedom of expression, Hong Kong, media, news by tracey

‘The Chinese state-backed news channel CGTN is under investigation by the British media regulator over claims its coverage of protests in Hong Kong breached broadcasting rules.’

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The Guardian, 23rd September 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com