Politicians too slow to defend judges after Brexit case, says supreme court president – The Guardian

Posted February 16th, 2017 in judges, judiciary, media, news, parliament, treaties by sally

‘Britain’s top judge has spoken out about media attacks on the judiciary and the failure of politicians to stand up for judges after the Brexit court challenge.’

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The Guardian, 16th February 2017

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Whistleblowers keep us safe. We can’t allow them to be silenced – The Guardian

‘With its proposed changes to the Official Secrets Act, the Law Commission would make it all but impossible for government wrongdoing to be exposed.’

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The Guardian, 13th February 2017

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Judges reject media request to release marine shooting video – The Guardian

‘Three of the UK’s most senior judges have rejected a request by the Guardian and other media organisations to sanction the release of video footage showing a British Royal Marine shooting dead a wounded Taliban fighter.’

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The Guardian, 31st January 2017

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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‘Fake news’ inquiry opened by MPs – OUT-LAW.com

‘A UK parliamentary committee has opened an inquiry into so-called ‘fake news’.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 31st January 2017

Source: www.out-law.com

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Don Hale: One man’s fight for justice – BBC News

Posted January 27th, 2017 in media, miscarriage of justice, murder, news, rape by sally

‘Fifteen years ago Stephen Downing was acquitted after spending 27 years in prison for murder, overturning one of Britain’s most notorious miscarriages of justice and putting into the spotlight the local newspaper editor who helped to bring the police’s case tumbling down.’

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BBC News, 26th January 2017

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Sentencing changes may raise speeding fines but relax TV licence penalty – The Guardian

‘Motorists convicted of speeding will face higher fines related to their income while people who fail to pay their TV licences could avoid financial penalties in future, under new sentencing guidelines introduced for magistrates.’

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The Guardian, 24th January 2017

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Anonymity – London Review of Books

‘Anonymous and pseudonymous publication has a long history. It may now be the exception in literary and specialist journalism, but at the start of the 19th century it was pretty much the rule – to the extent that France in 1850 legislated to forbid the publication of unsigned articles on philosophical, political and religious subjects. A new book by Eric Barendt, Anonymous Speech: Literature, Law and Politics (Hart, £25), traces the contemporaneous voluntary abandonment of anonymity in England and the often pompous arguments that accompanied it. The fact was that journals’ recruitment of well-known writers – Thackeray, Dickens – was starting to put a premium on names. So when the Fortnightly Review started up in 1865, it announced that all its articles would be signed and free of editorial pressure. By contrast, from its foundation in 1913 the New Statesman anonymised its contributors, though the editor, having explained that this was necessary in order to establish a common style and tone, couldn’t resist announcing that Sidney Webb and Bernard Shaw would be writing for it. In 1925 the Spectator, after not quite a hundred years of unsigned articles, abandoned anonymity, and the New Statesman followed. Articles in the TLS remained anonymous until 1974, and obituaries in the Times and Telegraph are unsigned to this day. So are the entirety of the Economist and the bulk of Private Eye.’

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London Review of Books, 19th January 2017

Source: www.lrb.co.uk

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SDT throws out surveillance allegations against News of the World solicitor – Legal Futures

Posted January 19th, 2017 in costs, disciplinary procedures, media, news, solicitors by tracey

‘The Solicitors Disciplinary Tribunal has thrown out charges against a solicitor for Rupert Murdoch’s News International accused of unreasonably advising and commissioning surveillance of two high-profile lawyers bringing phone hacking cases.’

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Legal Futures, 19th January 2017

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

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Daniel Morgan murder suspects named in court 30 years after killing – The Guardian

Posted January 18th, 2017 in conspiracy, corruption, malicious prosecution, media, murder, news, police by sally

‘The alleged conspirators in the unsolved murder of Daniel Morgan have been named in court, nearly 30 years after the private detective was found dead with an axe embedded in his head in a pub car park.’

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The Guardian, 17th January 2017

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Section 40: Will the press be forced to pay the costs in court cases – even if they win? – The Independent

Posted January 9th, 2017 in consultations, costs, freedom of expression, media, news, privacy by sally

‘The Big Question: Are press reforms needed in the wake of the phone hacking scandal, or will they prove financially ruinous to some outlets?’

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The Independent, 9th January 2017

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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Making newspapers pay legal costs for libel cases even if they win is ’eminently fair’, says Max Mosley – The Independent

Posted January 4th, 2017 in costs, defamation, media, news by tracey

‘Proposals which could see newspapers forced to pay their opponents’ legal costs even if they win in court are “eminently fair”, according to Max Mosley.’

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The Independent, 3rd January 2017

Source; www.independent.co.uk

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Mail pays out £150,000 to Muslim family over Katie Hopkins column – The Guardian

Posted December 20th, 2016 in compensation, costs, Islam, media, news by sally

‘Mail Online has been forced to pay out £150,000 to a British Muslim family over a Katie Hopkins column which falsely accused them of extremism.’

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The Guardian, 19th December 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Music talent show was ‘independently created’ and did not involve a misuse of confidential information, rules Court of Appeal – OUT-LAW.com

Posted December 8th, 2016 in appeals, enforcement, intellectual property, media, news by tracey

‘A music talent show broadcast on Sky was “independently created”, the UK Court of Appeal has ruled, dismissing claims that the show copied features contained in a pitch for another talent show made to the broadcaster the year previously.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 7th December 2016

Source: www.out-law.com

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BBC disputes Cliff Richard payout claim over police raid coverage – The Guardian

Posted December 8th, 2016 in BBC, compensation, complaints, media, news, police, privacy by tracey

‘BBC bosses have drawn up a defence case after Sir Cliff Richard took legal action in the wake of reports naming him as a suspected sex offender. They deny the singer is entitled to compensation after publicity about a raid on his home in August 2014. Detail of the BBC’s defence has emerged in paperwork lodged by lawyers at the high court in London pending any court hearings.’

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The Guardian, 7th December 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Gina Miller: supreme court judges on Brexit case are being vilified – The Guardian

Posted December 5th, 2016 in judiciary, media, news, Supreme Court by sally

‘The supreme court judges who will decide whether the government has the right to trigger article 50 without a parliamentary vote have been disgracefully vilified, according to the lead claimant in the case.’

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The Guardian, 4th December 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Eric King and Daniella Lock: Investigatory Powers Bill: Key Changes Made by the Lords – UK Constitutional Law Association

Posted December 1st, 2016 in bills, investigatory powers, media, news, parliament, privacy, warrants by sally

‘What was formerly known as the Investigatory Powers Bill has received Royal Assent and is now the Investigatory Powers Act. The Bill was first published in draft form in November 2015 (- for a very helpful analysis of the Bill at this stage, please read Dr Tom Hickman’s blog). The passage of the Bill through Parliament, after it was it was introduced in March this year, took just under nine months. Amendments made by the House of Commons were described as ‘largely technical or minor drafting amendments’. Consequently, for all those hoping to see significant changes made to the legislation, a lot hung on the Bill’s amendments during its passage through the Lords.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 1st December 2016

Source: www.ukconstitutionallaw.org

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Hillsborough: police media officer loses ‘coercion to spin’ case – The Guardian

Posted November 30th, 2016 in complaints, inquests, media, misfeasance, news, reports by tracey

‘A press officer for South Yorkshire police who said she was pressured to spin positive coverage for the force at the Hillsborough inquests has lost her complaint with the police watchdog.’

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The Guardian, 29th November 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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David Baddiel show breached rules with jokes on Queen’s sex life – The Guardian

Posted November 22nd, 2016 in BBC, codes of practice, media, news by sally

‘Jokes about the Queen’s sex life on David Baddiel’s Radio 4 show and Fox News host Sean Hannity’s coverage of the US election have been found in breach of UK broadcasting rules.’

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The Guardian, 21st November 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Why the bikini photographs of Princess Beatrice fell foul of Ipso – The Guardian

Posted November 21st, 2016 in media, news, photography, privacy, royal family by sally

‘Regulator censures Mail Online for ‘a gratuitous and invasive’ focus on the princess’s body, which ‘represented a serious intrusion into her privacy’.’

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The Guardian, 21st November 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Mirror publisher pays out £500,000 to settle phone-hacking claims – The Guardian

Posted November 18th, 2016 in compensation, interception, media, news, privacy, telecommunications by sally

‘The publisher of the Daily Mirror has paid out more than £500,000 to settle phone-hacking claims by 29 people including the entertainer Les Dennis, presenter Natasha Kaplinsky and EastEnders actor Steve McFadden.’

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The Guardian, 17th November 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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