Caroline’s Law: Calls For Stricter Laws Against Media Intrusion – Each Other

Posted February 18th, 2020 in human rights, media, news, privacy, suicide by sally

‘The death of TV presenter Caroline Flack has sparked calls for a stricter law to safeguard the human rights of people in the public eye.’

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Each Other, 17th February 2020

Source: eachother.org.uk

Crown Court (Recording and Broadcasting) Order 2020: Questions We Should Be Asking – KCH Garden Sq

Posted February 6th, 2020 in chambers articles, Crown Court, media, news, video recordings by sally

‘When we think of televised court proceedings our minds instantly turn to the catchy maxim – ‘if it doesn’t fit, you must acquit’. Johnnie Cochran’s words, spoken during the defence team’s closing argument of OJ Simpson’s trial, came to embody a sensational trial which was televised over 134 days. And who can forget the footage of OJ, putting on the black gloves and showing his hands to the judge and jury? Then we fast forward to 2016, and the world watched as Oscar Pistorius – Paralympic champion and breaker of glass ceilings – walked across the courtroom on his stumps at his resentencing hearing for the murder of Reeva Steenkamp.’

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KCH Garden Sq, 29th January 2020

Source: kchgardensquare.co.uk

Judges’ sentencing in high-profile court cases to be televised – The Guardian

Posted January 16th, 2020 in judgments, media, news, sentencing by sally

‘Judges sentencing convicted offenders in high-profile criminal cases in England and Wales, including murders, rapes and other serious offences, will be televised from later this year, the Ministry of Justice has said.’

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The Guardian, 16th January 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

The President of the Family Division’s New Guidance on Reporting in the Family Courts (3rd October 2019) – Becket Chambers

‘Faced with the competing claims of transparency and privacy, free speech and family life, family law will always incline towards the latter. Its first instincts are protective, guarding the intimacies and lives of its own subject families and, particularly, its children.[1] First and foremost, family proceedings are and remain private matters. This fundamental principle holds fast. However, things are not simply as they were before. Successive Presidents of the Family Division have now expressly addressed the subject in the form of three separate occasions. At the very least, it is clear that the dynamic is being given careful thought. Whilst the guidances do not amount to a tilting of the scales, they are nevertheless guidances specifically designed to address acts of reporting. When President of the Family Division, Sir James Munby issued two guidances on transparency and anonymisation. Sir Andrew McFarlane, the current President, has now (as of October 2018) issued further guidance specifically dealing with applications to lift and vary reporting restrictions.’

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Becket Chambers, 15th January 2020

Source: becket-chambers.co.uk

VAT charges on digital versions of newspapers overturned – OUT-LAW.com

Posted January 9th, 2020 in EC law, electronic commerce, internet, media, news, statutory interpretation, VAT by tracey

‘A major publisher has been successful in overturning a previous ruling that found that the digital versions of its newspapers were subject to VAT charges.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 8th January 2020

Source: www.pinsentmasons.com

White House Farm: Who is Jeremy Bamber? – BBC News

Posted January 8th, 2020 in adoption, families, judicial review, media, murder, news by sally

‘Bamber was found guilty of murdering his adoptive parents, sister and her twin sons after all five were found with gunshot wounds at their Georgian farmhouse in Tolleshunt D’Arcy, Essex, on 7 August 1985, when he was 24.’

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BBC News, 8th January 2020

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

VAT ruling on Times digital edition could save News UK millions – The Guardian

Posted January 7th, 2020 in internet, media, news, VAT by sally

‘Rupert Murdoch’s newspaper group could be set for a substantial financial windfall after successfully arguing that the Times’ digital edition is effectively a print newspaper because its website is rarely updated.’

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The Guardian, 6th January 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Judge makes preliminary ruling in Carole Cadwalladr libel case – The Guardian

‘A judge has issued a preliminary ruling in a libel action against the investigative journalist Carole Cadwalladr and warned that broadcasts and public speeches should not be interpreted as though they were formal written texts.’

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The Guardian, 12th December 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

Welcome to the jungle – New Law Journal

Posted December 10th, 2019 in media, misuse of private information, news, privacy by sally

‘I’m a celebrity, but don’t get my private information out of here! Jeremy Clarke-Williams & Nilly Tabatabai report (Pt 1).’

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New Law Journal, 5th December 2019

Source: www.newlawjournal.co.uk

Grace Millane’s Trial Exposes A Dark Trend In Coverage Of Violence Against Women – Rights Info

Posted November 28th, 2019 in media, murder, news, victims, women by sally

‘The murder of Grace Millane in 2018 seized front pages of media outlets worldwide, with article after article fixated on details of her personal history. These details implied that the sexually violent nature of Millane’s death was somehow a product of her own actions, and this treatment is itself part of a much larger media trend in how violence against women is represented.’

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Rights Info, 27th November 2019

Source: rightsinfo.org

‘I’m a Celebrity – Get Me a Confidentiality Clause!’ – No. 5 Chambers

Posted November 26th, 2019 in confidentiality, consent, divorce, media, news, non-disclosure agreements by sally

‘The national press has relished reporting the ongoing saga of Ant McPartlin’s divorce from his former wife, Lisa Armstrong. The public have been informed of the details regarding the extent of the couple’s wealth (reported to be around £62m), the amount the couple have spent on legal costs (reported to be £1.5m) and the latest offer made by Ant (reported to consist of a package which would leave Lisa with around £31m). Lisa denies that Ant has made such an offer but perhaps of most interest to divorce lawyers is the suggestion that whatever the true extent of Ant’s offer, Lisa is not prepared to sign a consent order due to Ant’s insistence that any such order should contain a non-disclosure agreement (N.D.A.)’

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No. 5 Chambers, 19th November 2019

Source: www.no5.com

The President’s New Clothes – Transparency Project

Posted November 25th, 2019 in domestic violence, families, family courts, judges, media, news by sally

‘This week has seen reports in the legal press of a speech in which the President of the Family Division set out an idea for a research project about news reports containing accounts of how family courts have handled domestic abuse claims. See for example : Press attacks on family courts should be assessed – McFarlane by Monidipa Fouzder in The Gazette.’

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Transparency Project, 23rd November 2019

Source: www.transparencyproject.org.uk

General election 2019: Lib Dems launch legal action over ITV debate – BBC News

Posted November 12th, 2019 in elections, judicial review, media, news, political parties by sally

‘The Liberal Democrats are launching a legal challenge against ITV over its decision to exclude their leader from the channel’s election debate.’

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BBC News, 11th November 2019

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Media and Defamation Law – The Pupillage Podcast

Posted November 6th, 2019 in defamation, freedom of expression, injunctions, media, news, privacy by sally

‘The recent announcement by the Duke and Duchess of Sussex — aka Harry and Meghan — that they are planning to sue Associated Newspapers after the Mail on Sunday published a private letter from Meghan to her father, has put the spotlight on media and defamation law – the topic of this episode of the pupillage podcast. We hear about celebrities and super injunctions, but also learn that nothing is beyond the reach of this fascinating area of law, from anti-semitism, to medical research, to the parish newsletter. If you’re interested in the conflict between free speech and privacy, and in truth and opinion then this episode is for you.’

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The Pupillage Podcast, October 2019

Source: soundcloud.com

When “maybe” isn’t good enough: orders for production of journalistic material – Panopticon

Posted October 30th, 2019 in disclosure, evidence, investigatory powers, media, news, police by sally

‘The efforts of the Beeb in the Divisional Court have clarified the conditions to be satisfied before a Court can require journalistic material be produced in criminal cases.’

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Panopticon, 29th October 2019

Source: panopticonblog.com

Mail on Sunday writer spared jail after recording court hearing on phone – The Guardian

Posted October 24th, 2019 in contempt of court, fines, media, news, sentencing, suspended sentences by sally

‘A Mail on Sunday features writer has been spared jail after blaming “work pressure” for recording a court hearing on her mobile phone.’

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The Guardian, 23rd October 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

Paul Burrell and James Hewitt among latest phone-hacking cases – The Guardian

Posted October 22nd, 2019 in interception, media, news, privacy, telecommunications by tracey

‘Princess Diana’s former lover James Hewitt and her butler Paul Burrell are among dozens of individuals who have joined Prince Harry in the latest round of phone-hacking claims against tabloid newspaper publishers.’

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The Guardian, 21st October 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

Ben Stokes takes legal action against Sun over story of family tragedy – The Guardian

Posted October 11th, 2019 in families, freedom of expression, media, news, privacy, sport by tracey

‘Ben Stokes and his mother, Deborah, have launched legal action against the Sun for invasion of privacy, after the newspaper last month published a front-page story detailing a tragedy involving the England cricketer’s family.’

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The Guardian, 10th October 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

The Sun breached guidelines with Harry and Meghan story – The Guardian

Posted October 2nd, 2019 in complaints, media, news, parking, royal family by sally

‘The Sun newspaper has apologised to the Duke and Duchess of Sussex after the press regulator ruled it had breached accuracy guidelines in an article about an alleged staff parking ban at their home.’

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The Guardian, 30th September 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

Ofcom investigates CGTN over coverage of Hong Kong protests – The Guardian

Posted September 24th, 2019 in China, demonstrations, freedom of expression, Hong Kong, media, news by tracey

‘The Chinese state-backed news channel CGTN is under investigation by the British media regulator over claims its coverage of protests in Hong Kong breached broadcasting rules.’

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The Guardian, 23rd September 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com