Entrepreneur with “strong views on breastfeeding” unfairly dismissed lawyer – Legal Futures

‘A Russian entrepreneur based in the UK with “strong views on the importance of breastfeeding” unfairly dismissed a lawyer after she took maternity leave, an employment tribunal has ruled.’

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Legal Futures, 5th May 2021

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

Swastikas, employment and “religious” symbols: Horvarth – UK Law & Religion

‘Istvan Horvarth started working at the Lidl store in Telford Hadley, Shropshire, in 2013. A colleague complained that Horvarth showed him his “swastika” tattoo and in April 2019 Horvarth was sacked. In Mr I Horvarth v Lidl Great Britain Ltd [2021] ET/ 1307164/2019, he claimed unfair dismissal and discrimination based on race and/or religion or belief. He also claimed that he had been subjected to a number of incidents of harassment related to his race from approximately 2016 onwards, immediately following the Brexit referendum [3]. Following two case management hearings before Employment Judge Flood, he withdrew his claims of discrimination based on religion and/or belief and they were dismissed in a judgment dated 22 May 2020 [2].’

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UK Law & Religion, 30th April 2021

Source: lawandreligionuk.com

S&G lawyer wins unfair dismissal claim – but no damages – Legal Futures

Posted May 4th, 2021 in damages, employment tribunals, news, redundancy, unfair dismissal by tracey

‘A senior costs specialist at Slater & Gordon (S&G) has won a claim for unfair dismissal on one ground but an employment tribunal decided it would not be just to award him damages.’

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Legal futures, 4th May 2021

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

Judge criticises firm’s failures in defending solicitor’s dismissal claim – Legal Futures

‘A conveyancing solicitor has won her unfair dismissal and discrimination claim against a well-known Essex law firm by default after it filed its defence two days late.’

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Legal Futures, 26th April 2021

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

Freshfields report into bank rape allegations not covered by privilege – Law Society’s Gazette

‘A report prepared by magic circle firm Freshfields into the alleged rape of a bank employee was not covered by legal privilege, according to an employment tribunal ruling that has now been made public.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 21st April 2021

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Disciplinary Déjà vu: Res Judicata and Trade Union Disciplinary Proceedings – Parklane Plowden

‘The case related to a complaint made against Mr McFadden, that he had inappropriately touched a woman at an anti-austerity march attended by Unite members. A complaint was raised with Unite and Mr McFadden was found to have breached the union’s rules on conduct “in the workplace”. He appealed through the union’s procedures and his appeal was unsuccessful. Thereafter, Mr McFadden made a complaint to the assistant certification officer [“ACO”]. The ACO determined that as the alleged conduct was outside the workplace, in a context where Mr McFadden was not acting as a representative of Unite, nor at an event organised by Unite, the complaint did not pertain to conduct that Unite could discipline him for and consequently the allegation was null and void. The ACO ordered Unite to reinstate McFadden to his positions held prior to the suspension.’

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Parklane Plowden, 10th March 2021

Source: www.parklaneplowden.co.uk

Solicitor unfairly dismissed for refusing Covid variation to contract – Legal Futures

‘A solicitor fired after refusing a demand to vary her contract so her firm could furlough her or reduce her wages to help it cope with the impact of Covid has won a claim for unfair dismissal.’

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Legal Futures, 15th April 2021

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

Thousands in UK may have missed out on work rights redress, study finds – The Guardian

Posted April 15th, 2021 in compensation, employment tribunals, fees, news, statistics by sally

‘A four-year policy of charging workers up to £1,200 to take law-breaking bosses to court was based on misleading data, a study has found, meaning thousands of people may have wrongly missed out on redress for breaches of employment rights.’

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The Guardian, 14th April 2021

Source: www.theguardian.com

Covid-19 related absence dismissal was not automatically unfair – St Philips Barristers

‘The Leeds Employment Tribunal has recently determined one of the first dismissals arising out of the coronavirus pandemic in Rogers v Leeds Laser Cuttings Ltd [2021] No. 1803829/2020, writes Jonathan Gidney.’

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St Philips Chambers, 25th March 2021

Source: st-philips.com

An erroneous decision to extend time under s.123(1)(b) Equality Act 2010 – 3PB

‘The Honourable Mrs Justice Ellenbogen, sitting in the EAT, held that a tribunal had erred in extending time under s.123(1)(b) Equality Act 2010 (“EqA 2010”), by failing to determine whether a claimant’s ignorance of his right to claim direct race discrimination was reasonable.’

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3PB, 2nd March 2021

Source: www.3pb.co.uk

Cross – establishment comparisons are generally to be permitted save in exceptional circumstances: Asda Stores Ltd v. Brierley & Ors [2019] EWCA Civ 44 – 3PB

‘This Equal Pay claim has been ongoing for some time already (since 2016) and is set to continue for some time yet. In short, the Supreme Court’s Judgment handed down 3 days ago (26th March 2021) is focused upon a narrow point, which whilst of importance and interest to both parties and their advisors, in no sense has brought closure to these proceedings which are likely to continue to attract media attention as the layers of equal value litigation unfold.’

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3PB, 29th March 2021

Source: www.3pb.co.uk

R.I.P Gig Economy? – 4 King’s Bench Walk

‘On February 19th, the Supreme Court dismissed Uber’s appeal upholding the decision of the Employment Tribunal: a ruling upheld both by the EAT and the Court of Appeal. Lord Leggatt’s judgment confirmed that the claimant Uber drivers were workers for the purposes of the Working Time Regulations, national minimum wage legislation, and the Employment Rights Act 1996. In a unanimous judgment, the Supreme Court sent the case back to the Employment Tribunal to determine the claims on their merits.’

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4 King's Bench Walk, 4th March 2021

Source: www.4kbw.co.uk

Protected acts: beware a cautious approach – 3PB

‘R indicated that it wanted to arrange a Christmas dinner, and proposed a date for it. No objections were raised. Hotels and planes were consequently booked. Thereafter C (and a co-worker) indicated that the planned date did not suit them. R considered the matter but declined to change the date, various arrangements having already been made.’

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3PB, 2nd March 2021

Source: www.3pb.co.uk

No TUPE protection for staff after firm’s owner made bankrupt – Legal Futures

‘There was no protection for staff under the TUPE after the sole owner of a law firm was made bankrupt and the practice taken over, the Employment Appeal Tribunal (EAT) has ruled.’

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Legal Futures, 8th April 2021

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

Law firm did not discriminate against menopausal apprentice – Legal Futures

‘A law firm did not discriminate against a legal secretary turned apprentice with menopausal symptoms on the grounds of disability or sex, an employment tribunal has ruled.’

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Legal Futures, 6th April 2021

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

Tribunal: Law firm’s part-time FD was worker, not self-employed – Legal Futures

‘An accountant who acted as a law firm’s part-time finance director through a company was a worker and not self-employed, even though he had another client, an employment tribunal has ruled.’

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Legal Futures, 29th March 2021

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

Supreme Court: Carers not entitled to minimum wage when asleep – Law Society’s Gazette

‘Care workers who “sleep-in” are not entitled to the national minimum wage when they are in bed, the Supreme Court has ruled.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 19th March 2021

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Clapham vigil policing investigator is suing Home Office for sex and race bias – The Guardian

‘The investigator helping coordinate the official inquiry into the Metropolitan police’s handling of the Sarah Everard vigil and concerns over women’s safety is suing the Home Office for sex discrimination over claims that he has been penalised for being a “white man”, the Observer can reveal.’

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The Guardian, 21st March 2021

Source: www.theguardian.com

Does a Compulsory Retirement Age Infringe Human Rights Law? – by Hugh Collins – UK Labour Law Blog

‘An employer’s compulsory retirement scheme requires the dismissal of an employee for no other reason than the employee has attained a specified retirement age. The retirement age may be fixed in the terms of the contract of employment, a staff handbook, a collective agreement, or other regulations that determine the rules governing a particular retirement age. Although compulsory retirement used to be lawful, since 2011 the position in the United Kingdom (UK) is that an employee dismissed in accordance with an employer’s policy of a compulsory retirement age can bring a claim either for unfair dismissal under the Employment Rights Act 1996 or (for workers as well as employees) for age discrimination under the Equality Act 2010. Following Seldon v Clarkson Wright & Jakes [2012] UKSC 16, an employer can justify the age discrimination of a compulsory retirement age as a proportionate measure in pursuit of a legitimate aim, such as preserving the promotion prospects of younger staff or the avoidance of intrusive surveillance of the job performance of older staff.’

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UK Labour Law Blog, 17th March 2021

Source: uklabourlawblog.com

Courts close in on gig economy firms globally as workers seek rights – The Guardian

‘Gig economy companies, including Uber and Deliveroo, have faced at least 40 major legal challenges around the world as delivery drivers and riders try to improve their rights.’

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The Guardian, 17th March 2021

Source: www.theguardian.com