Coroners link eleven deaths to glitches in NHS 111 and 999 systems – Daily Telegraph

Posted July 16th, 2019 in bereavement, children, coroners, hospitals, inquests, news, telecommunications by tracey

‘The deaths of eleven patients, including two young children, have been linked to glitches in the algorithms used by the NHS 111 and 999 services.’

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Daily Telegraph, 15th July 2019

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Clash of rights of operators and landowner rights to redevelop clarified by Tribunal – OUT-LAW.com

Posted July 15th, 2019 in landlord & tenant, leases, news, planning, telecommunications by tracey

‘Land owners can prevent telecoms operators installing telecoms equipment on their property if they have a “firm, settled and unconditional intention” of redeveloping the sites the operators have earmarked, and can show that they have a reasonable prospect of being able to carry out their redevelopment plans, a tribunal has ruled.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 12th July 2019

Source: www.pinsentmasons.com

The Warwick ‘rape chat’ case exposes universities’ failings on sexual violence – The Guardian

‘A series of mishandled sexual assault cases have shown how university policies aren’t supporting students.’

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The Guardian, 11th July 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

CPS cancels meeting on rape victims’ phone data due to legal action – The Guardian

‘Police chiefs and prosecutors have been accused of treating a coalition of women’s groups with contempt after cancelling a meeting to discuss concerns over requests to hand over mobile phone records in rape investigations.’

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The Guardian, 6th July 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

The New Electronic Communications Code clarified – Falcon Chambers

Posted July 5th, 2019 in codes of practice, contracts, news, telecommunications, valuation by sally

‘The Upper Tribunal has recently provided helpful clarification of the workings of several aspects of the new Electronic Communications Code (“the Code”) introduced by the Digital Economy Act 2017, which came into force on 28 December 2017.’

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Falcon Chambers, June 2019

Source: www.falcon-chambers.com

Rape victims may not report attacks because of ‘intrusive’ phone demands, watchdog warns – The Independent

‘Rape victims may not report attacks because of “intrusive” demands for their mobile phones and personal records, a report has warned. Baroness Newlove, the outgoing victims’ commissioner for England and Wales, said there had been a “breakdown in confidence between victims of sexual violence and the criminal justice system”.’

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The Independent, 27th June 2019

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Police demanded rape victim’s phone and medical records despite identifying attacker by DNA – The Independent

Posted June 11th, 2019 in DNA, evidence, medical records, news, police, privacy, prosecutions, rape, telecommunications by tracey

‘Police demanded the mobile phone and personal records of a woman who was raped by a stranger eight years ago – even after identifying her attacker using DNA evidence.’

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The Independent, 10th June 2019

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Law firm “sacked staff member by WhatsApp”, tribunal finds – Legal Futures

‘A small law firm sacked its administrator by sending him a brief WhatsApp message – and then backdated his P45 to support an argument that he was actually fired earlier and so his claim was out of time, an employment tribunal has found.’

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Legal Futures, 22nd May 2019

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

Man who ‘confessed’ to raping woman in Facebook message was not prosecuted – The Independent

‘A man who “confessed” on Facebook Messenger to raping a woman in her sleep will not be prosecuted because authorities think there is “no realistic prospect of conviction”, The Independent can reveal.’

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The Independent, 19th May 2019

Source: www.independent.co.uk

UK government security decisions can be challenged in court, judges rule – The Guardian

‘Government security decisions will in future be open to challenge in the courts after judges ruled that a secretive intelligence tribunal could not be exempt from legal action.’

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The Guardian, 15th May 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

Phone and broadband firms to be forced to tell customers if they could be on cheaper deals under new Ofcom rules – Daily Telegraph

‘Broadband, TV, mobile and home phone companies will have to tell customers when their contract is coming to an end and show them the best deals available under new rules unveiled by Ofcom.

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Daily Telegraph, 15th May 2019

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Promoting cyber security for Internet of Things devices – Technology Law Update

‘The roll-out of 5G networks is ramping up with limited services available in parts of the US and South Korea. 2019 will see the launch of 5G in selected cities across the UK. This new, much faster, mobile connectivity will support a proliferation of internet-enabled devices. With expected benefits in terms of reduced latency and much greater capacity, many expect to see a proliferation of Internet of Things (IoT) devices as 5G becomes a reality.’

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Technology Law Update, 10th May 2019

Source: www.technology-law-blog.co.uk

Carl Sargeant: texts will not be heard at inquest, high court rules – The Guardian

Posted May 10th, 2019 in coroners, evidence, inquests, news, suicide, telecommunications by sally

‘The former Welsh first minister, Carwyn Jones, has lost a high court attempt to have text messages relating to the behaviour of a minister he sacked heard at his inquest.’

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The Guardian, 9th May 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

Anger as man who abused girlfriend is spared prison by judge who told him there are ‘lots more fish in the sea’ – The Independent

‘A man who has been convicted of coercive control has been spared prison after a judge told him to leave his ex-girlfriend alone because there are “lots more fish in the sea”.’

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The Independent, 8th May 2019

Source: www.independent.co.uk

This week’s round up – Williamson fired over Huawei and the courts return after Easter – UK Human Rights Blog

‘Despite the return of the courts on Monday, it was another relatively light week in terms of decisions in the fields of public law and human rights. However, the High Court decided a number of interesting clinical negligence cases, whilst the Court of Appeal gave judgement in the case of TM (Kenya), R (On the Application Of) v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2019] EWCA Civ 784.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 7th May 2019

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Why are rape prosecutions falling? – BBC News

‘Recorded rape offences have been rising in England and Wales, but the proportion of offences making it to court has fallen significantly over the past few years.’

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BBC News, 29th April 2019

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Rape cases ‘could fail’ if victims refuse to give police access to phones – The Guardian

‘Victims of rape and serious sexual assault who refuse to give police access to their mobile phone contents could allow suspects to avoid charges, two top officials have said.’

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The Guardian, 29th April 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

Retention of crime reports about alleged teenage ‘sexting’ did not breach Article 8 – UK Police Law Blog

‘In R (CL) v Chief Constable of Greater Manchester & Secretary of State for the Home Department [2018] EWHC 3333 (Admin), the Divisional Court held that the retention by the police of crime reports which related to sexting incidents in which a schoolboy had allegedly been involved did not breach his rights under Article 8 ECHR.’

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UK Police Law Blog, 9th April 2019

Source: ukpolicelawblog.com

Tribunal unable to impose new Code agreement over occupied site – OUT-LAW.com

‘The Upper Tribunal (Lands Chamber) has no jurisdiction to impose rights under the Electronic Communications Code (‘the Code’) in favour of an operator of telecommunications equipment, where a third party is currently occupying the land, it has concluded.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 8th April 2019

Source: www.out-law.com

A warning before bringing an appeal to the CAT? Costs after the BCMR decision – Blackstone Chambers

Posted March 15th, 2019 in appeals, competition, costs, news, telecommunications, tribunals by sally

‘The Court of Appeal’s judgment in the recent BCMR costs case is a stark warning to all those considering challenging a regulatory decision in the Competition Appeal Tribunal: even if you win, you may still face a big costs bill. See British Telecommunications plc v Office of Communications [2018] EWCA Civ 2542.’

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Blackstone Chambers, 5th March 2019

Source: www.blackstonechambers.com