Call for review of regulator costs in unsuccessful prosecutions – Legal Futures

‘The Law Commission should review whether regulators such as the Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA) should be insulated from costs orders in disciplinary actions they lose, a Court of Appeal judge has suggested.’

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Legal Futures, 26th May 2020

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

Judge names council after deciding knowledge of its social services failures in care case outweighed risk of jigsaw identification of children – Local Government Lawyer

‘A judge has severely criticised the London Borough of Haringey’s child social services department, after deciding to name the council following an appeal by the Press Association over an earlier anonymity order.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 21st May 2020

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Suspect under investigation has reasonable expectation of privacy, CoA rules – Law Society’s Gazette

‘Individuals under investigation by law enforcement bodies have a reasonable expectation of privacy up to the point they are charged, the Court of Appeal has confirmed. Dismissing an appeal by a news agency barred from revealing the identity of a US businessman identified in documents concerning a bribery probe, the court ruled that the fact that an individual is the subject of a criminal investigation is genuinely of a different character from allegations about the conduct being investigated.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 19th May 2020

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Duchess of Sussex: Mail on Sunday wins first round in Meghan privacy case – BBC News

‘The Mail on Sunday has won the first round of a legal battle against the Duchess of Sussex over the publication of a letter she wrote to her father.’

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BBC News, 1st May 2020

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Prosecuting Domestic Violence – New Law Journal

‘On Saturday 15 February, Caroline Flack’s tragic death became widespread news across the country. Having been charged with common assault of her boyfriend, Lewis Burton, she pleaded not guilty on 23 December last year and was due to face trial on 4 March. On the same day that she took her life, a statement from Ms Flack’s management strongly criticised the Crown Prosecution Servce (CPS) for pursuing the case, citing its knowledge of her vulnerability and the lack of support from the alleged victim.’

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New Law Journal, 26th March 2020

Source: www.newlawjournal.co.uk

Ealing rape victim’s family donate £10,000 to legal claim against CPS – The Guardian

‘The family of Jill Saward, the Ealing rape victim who became a leading figure in the fight against sexual violence, has donated thousands of pounds to a legal challenge against the Crown Prosecution Service.’

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The Guardian, 14th March 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Caroline Flack: Who decides whether someone should go on trial? – BBC News

Posted February 18th, 2020 in assault, domestic violence, news, prosecutions, public interest by sally

‘TV presenter Caroline Flack was found dead in her home on Saturday, weeks before she was due to stand trial for assaulting her boyfriend, Lewis Burton.’

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BBC News, 17th February 2020

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

‘Boy B’ in Yousef Makki case identity revealed – BBC News

‘A teenager cleared of lying to police over the fatal stabbing of a schoolboy can be named after losing a High Court bid to protect his anonymity.’

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BBC News, 11th February 2020

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Yousef Makki: Boy B loses bid to keep identity secret – BBC News

‘A teenager cleared of lying to police over the fatal stabbing of 17-year-old Yousef Makki has lost a High Court bid to protect his identity.’

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BBC News, 28th January 2020

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Cybercrime laws need urgent reform to protect UK, says report – The Guardian

Posted January 22nd, 2020 in computer crime, internet, news, public interest, statute law revision by sally

‘Britain’s cyber-defences are being endangered by the outdated Computer Misuse Act, which prevents investigators from dealing effectively with online threats while over-punishing immature defendants, according to a legal report.’

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The Guardian, 22nd January 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Exclusive: ‘perverse incentive’ contributed to slump in rape charges – Law Society’s Gazette

‘An undisclosed Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) target may be behind huge declines in numbers of rape suspects charged since 2016, the Gazette can reveal.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 13th November 2019

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Secretary “humiliated” by comments on 50th birthday loses claim against law firm – Legal Futures

‘A legal secretary who claimed she felt humiliated and insulted by a colleague commenting on her 50th birthday has lost her claim for harassment and age discrimination against the law firm.’

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Legal Futures, 8th November 2019

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

Bail changes to be reviewed after suspected rapists, murders and paedophiles released without restrictions – The Independent

‘Bail changes made by the Conservative government are being reviewed after the release of thousands of suspected violent criminals, paedophiles and rapists.’

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The Independent, 6th November 2019

Source: www.independent.co.uk

When to assess the public interest in a FOIA request? Four years ago says Upper Tribunal in Maurizi – Panopticon

Posted October 24th, 2019 in Crown Prosecution Service, freedom of information, news, public interest by sally

‘For four years, Italian journalist Stefania Maurizi has been fighting a FOIA battle for the release of correspondence held by the CPS concerning Wikileaks founder, Julian Assange.’

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Panopticon, 23rd October 2019

Source: panopticonblog.com

Libor rigging inquiry shut down by Serious Fraud Office – BBC News

‘An investigation into the rigging of Libor, the benchmark interest rate that tracks the cost of borrowing cash, has been unexpectedly closed.’

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BBC News, 19th October 2019

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

NDA advice “must be about more than just the law” – Legal Futures

‘Any solicitor who thinks it is only the law that restricts advice on non-disclosure agreements (NDAs), ignoring the wider public interest, is “heading for trouble”, experts have warned.’

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Legal Futures, 3rd September 2019

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

Alison Berridge, Alexandra Littlewood and Ciar McAndrew: Freedom of Information Journal – Recent decisions of the Commissioner and Tribunal – Monckton Chambers

‘Alison Berridge, Alexandra Littlewood and Ciar McAndrew, public law barristers at Monckton Chambers, highlight the points of interest from April-June decisions of the First-Tier and Upper Tribunals.’

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Monckton Chambers, 20th August 2019

Source: www.monckton.com

Parliamentary group calls for overhaul of whistleblowing legislation – OUT-LAW.com

‘A group of politicians has recommended an extensive overhaul of whistleblowing legislation, including the creation of a legal definition for the term “whistleblower”.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 6th August 2019

Source: www.pinsentmasons.com

Shamima Begum being investigated by British police despite government vow not to bring her back to UK – The Independent

Posted August 7th, 2019 in appeals, citizenship, Islam, media, news, police, public interest, terrorism by tracey

‘British police are investigating Shamima Begum despite the government’s decision to remove her UK citizenship rather than repatriate her for trial. Scotland Yard is attempting to seize unpublished notes made by journalists who interviewed the former Isis member in Syria.’

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The Independent, 7th August 2019

Source: www.independent.co.uk

“No revolution” says the Supreme Court as it rules on defamation – UK Human Rights Blog

‘Lachaux v Independent Print Ltd and another [2019] UKSC 27. The Supreme Court has unanimously held that the Defamation Act 2013 altered the common law presumption of general damage in defamation. It is no longer sufficient for the imposition of liability that a statement is inherently injurious or has a “tendency” to injure a claimant’s reputation. Instead, the language of section 1(1) of the Act requires a statement to produce serious harm to reputation before it can be considered defamatory.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 17th june 2019

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com