Concern police will be able to ‘strong-arm’ NHS to hand over patient data under new plans – The Independent

‘Police forces will be able to “strong-arm” NHS bodies into handing over confidential patient data under planned laws that have sparked fury from doctors’ groups and the UK’s medical watchdog.’

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The Independent, 17th October 2021

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Retired solicitor sees off harassment claim over ‘puerile’ blog – Law Society’s Gazette

‘A retired solicitor’s “abrasive” and “frequently puerile” blog posts are entitled to the same level of protection as mainstream journalism, a High Court judge has ruled, striking out a harassment claim brought by a local government officer.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 19th July 2021

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Important new ruling on access to British Passports for those subject to nationality deprivation proceedings – EIN Blog

‘The Queen (on the application of Leonard Gjini) [2021] EWHC 1677 (Admin). In an important decision handed down on 21 June 2021, Mr Justice Morris clarified the circumstances in which it is permissible for the Home Office to decline to issue British Passports to persons subject to deprivation proceedings under section 40 of the British Nationality Act 1981 rejecting a contention by the Home Office that there was a public interest in refusing based on the fact of a past deception.’

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EIN Blog, 2nd July 2021

Source: www.ein.org.uk

All about images: privacy, visuocentrism, and the Hancock affair – City Law Forum

‘On Friday 25 June 2021, British tabloid The Sun published pictures of the UK Health Secretary, Matt Hancock, kissing Gina Coladangelo in his office at the Department of Health. These pictures were, it seems, captured by a CCTV camera in the office and leaked by person(s) unknown to the newspaper. The pictures were soon joined on The Sun’s website by a video clip (seemingly from the same camera). The clip shows Hancock and Coladangelo in what might be described as a passionate embrace. The footage lasts just over one minute and remains online, including on The Sun’s Youtube channel.’

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City Law Forum, 30th June 2021

Source: blogs.city.ac.uk

UK government loses legal battle over transparency of ‘Orwellian’ unit – The Guardian

‘The government has lost a legal battle to prevent the release of documents about an “Orwellian” unit that is accused of obstructing the release of material requested by the public under the Freedom of Information Act.’

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The Guardian, 8th June 2021

Source: www.theguardian.com

Christopher Kapessa: Mum plans legal action over river death – BBC News

‘A mother plans to launch her own legal action if the decision not to prosecute the boy reportedly involved in her son’s death is not reversed.’

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BBC News, 7th June 2021

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

High Court judge explains £250k cost-capping order in PPE procurement proceedings – Local Government Lawyer

‘A High Court judge has given her reasons for making a costs capping order of £250,000 in respect of both the claimants, the Good Law Project and EveryDoctor, and the defendant, the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, in the procurement challenge over the award of contracts for the supply of personal protective equipment (PPE).’

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Local Government Lawyer, 10th May 2021

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Street traders lose legal challenge over “innovative product” criterion imposed by council – Local Government Lawyer

‘A High Court judge has dismissed a legal challenge brought by street traders over a council’s implementation of a regulatory framework that requires stall owners to sell products not readily available on the high street.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 10th May 2021

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

MI5 policy allowing agents to commit crimes was legal, say judges – The Guardian

‘MI5’s partially secret policy of allowing agents to participate in serious crimes in pursuit of intelligence was legal, three court of appeal judges have concluded.’

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The Guardian, 9th March 2021

Source: www.theguardian.com

Shamima Begum: SSHD strikes back in Supreme Court – EIN Blog

‘Ms Shamima Begum was born and raised in the UK. She was a British citizen at birth and at age 15 she travelled to Syria with two friends and soon afterwards she married an ISIS fighter and is currently detained in poor conditions in the Al-Roj camp run by the Syrian Democratic Forces. She now wishes to return home to the UK to have a fair and effective appeal. She was deprived of her British citizenship on 19 February 2019 because the SSHD believed that her return would present a risk to national security. She applied for leave to enter (LTE) the UK so that she could pursue an appeal against the deprivation decision. The Court of Appeal unanimously held that the only way Ms Begum, can have a fair and effective appeal is to be permitted to come into the UK to pursue her appeal. King, Flaux and Singh LJJ found that fairness and justice must – on the facts of her case – outweigh any national security concerns. But in a twist of fate, the Supreme Court unanimously held in favour of the SSHD and found that the right to a fair hearing does not trump everything else, such as the public’s safety. The court took the view that if a vital public interest makes it impossible for a case to be fairly heard, then the courts cannot ordinarily hear it. Therefore, her deprivation appeal should be stayed until she can play an effective part in it without compromising the public’s safety.’

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EIN Blog, 7th March 2021

Source: www.ein.org.uk

M (A Child): Live streaming from the Court of Appeal on Thursday 4th March – Should a journalist be able to see the court documents behind a flawed decision that a child needed adoption? – Transparency Project

‘This is a short blog to introduce the people and issues, and explain the lead up, ahead of the live-streamed appeal in M (A Child) tomorrow. It aims to give non lawyers a bit of orientation and some links when tuning in to the court of appeal proceedings.’

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Transparency Project, 3rd March 2021

Source: www.transparencyproject.org.uk

Case Comment: R (Good Law Project & Others) v Secretary of State for Health AND Social Care [2021] EWHC 346 (Admin) – Late Publication of Coronavirus Contracts Unlawful – 39 Essex Chambers

‘Last Friday Chamberlain J handed down judgment in a challenge concerning the government’s compliance with procurement law and its own transparency guidance in the awarding of goods and services contracts during the COVID-19 pandemic. By reg. 50 of the Public Contracts Regulations 2015 the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care was obliged to send for publication a contract award notice (“CAN”) not later than 30 days after the award of a contract. By its transparency policy and principles it was obliged to publish details of any contract.’

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39 Essex Chambers, 23rd February 2021

Source: www.39essex.com

Judgment in Good Law Project JR on publication of Covid-19 procurement notices – Monckton Chambers

‘This is the first in a series of procurement law judicial review (JR) cases relating to Covid-19 brought by the Good Law Project (GLP) to have reached the judgment stage. The case concerned the (non)publication of contract award notices (CANs) within 30 days under regulation 50 Public Contracts Regulations 2015 (PCR) and of other contract notices and materials within 20 or 90 days under relevant transparency policies.’

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Monckton Chambers, 19th February 2021

Source: www.monckton.com

N.A. Moreham: Police investigations: privacy, confidence and public duties – UK Constitutional Law Association

Posted February 18th, 2021 in confidentiality, misuse of private information, news, police, public interest by sally

‘The Court of Appeal has recently affirmed the proposition that a person can be liable under the misuse of private information tort for revealing that someone is the subject of a police investigation before they have been charged. This raises important questions about the relationship between the citizen and the state when the former has the latter under investigation. But so far that relationship has not been central to the courts’ decision-making on this issue. Rather, the basis for liability has been a broad-brush conclusion that a person will generally have a reasonable expectation of privacy in the fact that they “have simply come under suspicion” of the police or other state authority. This blog post will suggest there is a better way to resolve these tricky cases.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 18th February 2021

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

Markle judgment warns against ‘Micawber’ tactics – Law Society’s Gazette

‘The High Court has sounded a new warning about “Micawber tactics” in a summary judgment in the high-profile action brought by the Duchess of Sussex (Meghan Markle) against the Mail newspaper. Lord Justice Warby, sitting as a judge in the Chancery Division, found that the duchess had a reasonable expectation of privacy when she wrote a personal letter to her father, even though she feared it might be leaked to the press.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 12th February 2021

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Legal bid launched to ban ex-Carillion directors from top boardroom roles – The Guardian

Posted January 14th, 2021 in company directors, disqualification, insolvency, news, public interest by tracey

‘The UK government has launched a legal bid to ban eight former Carillion directors from holding senior boardroom positions, almost three years on from the collapse of the outsourcing business.’

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The Guardian, 13th January 2021

Source: www.theguardian.com

MoJ plans to cut “hopeless” Upper Tribunal appeals – Litigation Futures

‘The current test for appeals from the Upper Tribunal to the Court of Appeal is “not strict enough to prevent misuse” of the system by those wanting to benefit from delays caused by “hopeless challenges”, the Ministry of Justice (MoJ) has said.’

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Litigation Futures, 7th December 2020

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

Dolan’s latest lockdown defeat – UK Human Rights Blog

‘The appellants challenged Lockdown regulations made in response to the Covid-19 pandemic on 26 March 2020. Their argument was that the regulations imposed sweeping restrictions on civil liberties which were unprecedented and were unlawful on three grounds. First, the Government had no power under the legislation they used to make the regulations, namely the Public Health (Control of Disease) Act 1984, as amended by the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (“the 1984 Act”). Secondly, they were unlawful under ordinary public law principles (failing to take account of relevant considerations, fettering of discretion); and thirdly they violated a number of the Convention rights which are guaranteed in domestic law under the Human Rights Act 1998 (“HRA”). Although the regulations were amended on several occasions and have since been repealed, the appellants contended that it remained important that the legal issues which arose should be authoritatively determined in the public interest.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 3rd December 2020

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Land-use Conflict – Supreme Court Rules on the Discharge of Restrictive Covenants: Alexander Devine Children’s Cancer Trust v Housing Solutions Ltd [2020] UKSC 45 – 39 Essex Chambers

‘The appeal in Alexander Devine Children’s Cancer Trust v Housing Solutions Ltd [2020] UKSC 45 was the first time that either the Supreme Court or the House of Lords had considered the Upper Tribunal’s power to discharge or modify restrictive covenants affecting land under section 84 of the Law of Property Act 1925. The case confirms important principles affecting the interplay between private law property rights, planning and land use. Lord Burrows, giving the only substantive judgment of the Supreme Court, agreed with the Court of Appeal that the Upper Tribunal’s decision was wrong, but disagreed in a number of important respects with the speech of Sales LJ (as he then was) in the Court of Appeal ([2018] EWCA Civ 2679). For a number of reasons, it is likely that we shall be reading and re-reading this Supreme Court decision for many years to come.’

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39 Essex Chambers, 9th November 2020

Source: www.39essex.com

Restrictive Covenants: Ignore at your Peril – St Ives Chambers

Posted November 10th, 2020 in housing, news, public interest, restrictive covenants, Supreme Court by sally

‘In the first appeal in which the Supreme Court has been required to deal with s. 84 of the Law of Property Act 1925, it has delivered a strong warning to developers who may contemplate building on land in breach of a restrictive covenant: Ignore at your Peril.’

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St Ives Chambers, 8th November 2020

Source: www.stiveschambers.co.uk