Professional Regulation – Case Comment: Caroline Reilly V Teaching Regulation Agency and Secretary of State for Education (2020) EWHC 1188 (Admin) – Park Square Barristers

‘The appellant was the head teacher of a primary school in the West Midlands. She was dismissed from her post in July 2011 following disciplinary proceedings which arose in consequence of her failure to disclose the fact of her personal relationship with a man who had been convicted of offences involving the making and possessing of indecent images of children.’

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Park Square Barristers, 15th May 2020

Source: www.parksquarebarristers.co.uk

The Implied Term of Trust and Confidence and the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme: a Reply – Old Square Chambers

‘On 14 April 2020, our colleague Stuart Brittenden published an article arguing that the implied term of mutual trust and confidence (“the implied term”) requires employers to make use of the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (“CJRS”) for agency workers, zero-hour contract workers, and employees, generally.’

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Old Square Chambers, 19th May 2020

Source: www.oldsquare.co.uk

The Scope of the Last Straw Doctrine: Identifying The Camel’s Back. Williams v The Governing Body of Alderman Davies Church in Wales Primary School UKEAT/0109/19/LA – Parklane Plowden Chambers

‘After a period of mistreatment at the hands of his employer, encompassing a number of different acts or omissions, an employee resigns. The “trigger” for the resignation, the most recent incident (often identified as “the last straw”) has however been misinterpreted by the employee and is “entirely innocuous”; the employer did nothing wrong. The claim of constructive unfair dismissal fails, right?’

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Parklane Plowden Chambers, 12th May 2020

Source: www.parklaneplowden.co.uk

Shut-down firm ordered to pay former staff £375,000 – Legal Futures

‘A law firm shut down by its regulator last year has been ordered to pay former staff £375,000 for multiple employment law breaches.’

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Legal Futures, 22nd May 2020

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

Reilly v Secretary of State for Education – Blackstone Chambers

‘This decision exemplifies the stricter approach the courts are now taking in disciplinary cases where the regulated person fails to attend a hearing.’

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Blackstone Chambers, 13th May 2020

Source: www.blackstonechambers.com

British lawyer sues EU over her removal from its court due to Brexit – The Guardian

Posted May 1st, 2020 in barristers, brexit, citizenship, courts, EC law, employment, news, unfair dismissal by sally

‘The UK’s last judicial member of the European court of justice is suing the council of the European Union and the EU court over her removal from office because of Brexit.’

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The Guardian, 1st May 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Covid 19 Employment Law Series: Covid-19 and Loss of Earnings – Parklane Plowden

‘It is to be expected that the current pandemic will result in employers seeking to rely on economic hard times with a view to curtailing employees’ claims for loss of earnings and financial benefits. This will typically be through reliance on the contention that the employees would have been dismissed in any event and any compensation for loss of remuneration should therefore, be extinguished or reduced. In some cases, there will be genuine grounds for such a stance, whilst opportunism could be the driver in others. Thus far, there is no indication that significant job losses are predicted in central and local government and in public services sector. What is said hereafter is applicable principally to employment outside the public sector. This article deals both with ordinary unfair dismissal claim and claims in Great Britain based on protected status where there is no cap on compensation.’

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Parklane Plowden, 7th April 2020

Source: www.parklaneplowden.co.uk

Tribunal “incredulous” after firm secretary ends up in client’s will – Legal Futures

‘An employment tribunal has expressed its “incredulity” at the way a solicitor’s former secretary befriended one of his clients and ended up in the client’s will.’

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Legal Futures, 21st April 2020

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

Can dismissal for self-isolating be automatically unfair? – St John’s Buildings

Posted April 20th, 2020 in chambers articles, coronavirus, employment, equality, news, unfair dismissal by sally

‘Most of us are now up to speed (as far as possible) with the principle, and maybe practice, of furlough, but one thing that has yet to be tested is the ability of unfair dismissal protection to safeguard employees that are unable to attend or carry out work in line with current guidelines. At one point (specifically, 23.03.2020), there was a proposal to introduce provisions creating an automatic unfair dismissal where that dismissal was for ‘coronavirus-related’ reasons, and where the employer was entitled to reimbursement of statutory sick pay or payment under the coronavirus job retention scheme. That would have been to ensure that businesses being forced to close would also not result in mass job losses when funding to retain those jobs was available as an alternative to dismissal. At the date of writing, that proposal has not progressed, nor is there any other proposal to safeguard employees from any other ‘coronavirus-related’ dismissal. Whilst ordinary unfair dismissal principles will assist those employees with at least two years’ continuous employment, I wanted to consider a couple of options potentially open to employees not qualifying for that protection.’

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St John's Chambers, 16th April 2020

Source: stjohnsbuildings.com

Employee Dismissal Rights when Shielding: An Overview – Doughty Street Chambers

Posted April 20th, 2020 in chambers articles, coronavirus, employment, equality, news, unfair dismissal by sally

‘If your employer dismisses you as a result of you being unable to work due to you being in the shield group then you may have a claim for automatic unfair dismissal under s100(1)(d) or (e) of the Employment Rights Act 1996 (“ERA”), no minimum qualifying period of employment is required to bring this claim.’

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Doughty Street Chambers, 14th April 2020

Source: insights.doughtystreet.co.uk

Illegality and separating a PD from an underlying dispute – 3PB

‘Tracey Robinson (‘C’) was hired by Mr Cathcart on behalf of the Crown Prince Ras-alKhaimah (‘the Sheikh’) in 2007 to carry out a number of duties including looking after the Sheikh’s children and properties in the UK. The contract clearly stipulated that C was responsible for paying her own tax.’

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3PB, 2nd March 2020

Source: www.3pb.co.uk

Can a one-off decision amount to a PCP? Generally not, unless it can be shown that the decision, act or omission relied upon would be the same in a similar situation, says the Court of Appeal in Ishola v Transport for London [2020] EWCA Civ 112 – 3PB

‘Mr Ishola was employed by the respondent (TfL) as a customer services administrator. He was at all material times a disabled person suffering with depression and migraines. He raised a grievance about the conduct of a colleague in April 2015 which was not upheld, shortly after which he went on long-term sick leave. The sickness absence was managed by the respondent through a process of referrals to occupational health doctors and management review meetings. Ms Bhaimia was appointed as the “People Management Adviser” (or PMA) responsible for dealing with the claimant. The task of managing his absence on sick leave was given to Mr Walters.’

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3PB, 2nd March 2020

Source: www.3pb.co.uk

Long term disability benefits: it all depends on the contract – 3PB

‘This appeal concerned a provision about long term disability benefit (“LTDB”) which formed part of the Claimant’s contract of employment. It provided for the employee to receive a Disability Income of 2/3rds of his Base Annual Salary less the State Invalidity Pension should he be absent from, and unable to, work due to sickness or injury for a continuous period of twenty-six weeks or more, which would commence twenty-six weeks after the start of his absence and continue until the earlier date of his “return to work, death or retirement”.’

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3PB, 2nd March 2020

Source: www.3pb.co.uk

Jhuti in the context of unfair dismissal proceedings – 3PB

‘The Claimant (“C”), at the time of his dismissal, had worked for the Respondent (“R”) for a number of years and was employed as a Deputy Team Leader in the family intervention programme. He had been seconded however to a role within the Acton Team as a Support Worker. The complainant, referred to in the Judgment as “SR”, was a university student who was undertaking a 3-month work placement with R within the Ealing Team. She had shadowed C on 2 occasions but wasn’t mentored or supervised by him.’

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3PB, 2nd March 2020

Source: www.3pb.co.uk

Employment Tribunal awards whistleblowing doctor £857,000 – Local Government Lawyer

‘A doctor who lost his job after making whistleblowing disclosures has been awarded more than £857,000 by an Employment Tribunal.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 19th March 2020

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

ICTS (UK) Ltd v Visram (2020) EWCA 202 – Old Square Chambers

‘Do the words “return to work” in a long-term disability scheme mean return to any work or the work that the employee was undertaking prior to going on long term sickness?’

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Old Square Chambers, 24th February 2020

Source: www.oldsquare.co.uk

DWP ordered to pay former trainee £400k over racism and ageism – The Guardian

‘A woman is to receive nearly £400,000 from the Department for Work and Pensions after a judge ruled that her colleagues there had deliberately created a “hostile environment” of racism and ageism that forced her out of work.’

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The Guardian, 25th February 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Reasonable adjustments – Is it relevant that the employee didn’t mention them? – 3PB

‘The dispute arose from the claimant’s back problems, which, it was agreed, made her disabled within the Equality Act 2010. She was unable to travel far and wanted to work mainly from home. This caused difficulty because her role, auditing the performance of National Health Service bodies, was “client facing” and required her to visit those bodies. She was eventually dismissed for reason of ill-health capability after an occupational health report and negotiations with her union representative. The respondent was concerned that she was not meeting her financial targets, i.e. the required amount of chargeable time billed to the respondent’s clients. These receipts from clients funded her salary. There were not enough clients within the short travelling distance from her home that she could manage.’

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3PB, 7th February 2020

Source: www.3pb.co.uk

Council-owned company defends unfair dismissal claim from ADHD sufferer – Local Government Lawyer

‘A refuse collector has lost his claim for disability discrimination against Bristol Waste, a wholly-owned operation of Bristol City Council.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 20th February 2020

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

When are Article 8 rights engaged in the context of an unfair dismissal claim and how should the engagement of such rights be approached by the tribunal? – 3PB

‘The claimant was employed by the respondent from 1994 until November 2014 as a Probation Service Officer (“PSO”). In 2014 there was an incident at the claimant’s home involving the claimant, her then partner, and her daughter, who was then a teenager. It was alleged that the claimant had been violent towards her daughter, something she had always vehemently denied. Social Services became involved and her daughter was placed on the Child Protection Register (“CPR”).’

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3PB, 7th February 2020

Source: www.3pb.co.uk