Henry Pearce: Some Thoughts on the Encryption Regulatory Debate – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘Debates about the regulation of encryption technologies and surveillance have been around for decades. It is in unfortunate circumstances that these debates have now been thrust back into the public eye. Following the horrifying Westminster attack which occurred on 22nd March 2017 Amber Rudd, the UK’s Home Secretary, has been very vocal in suggesting that in order for the police and security services to be able to effectively investigate and prevent future terrorist acts they must be given access to over-the-top messaging services that utilise end-to-end encryption, such as WhatsApp. (End-to-end encryption services can generally be described as those which allows for conversations to be read only by the sender and recipient of individual messages, meaning that such messages cannot be intercepted and read by a third party.) Her comments appeared to have been driven by the fact that Khalid Masood, the perpetrator of the attack, had used WhatsApp shortly before commencing his appalling actions. In particular, Rudd has claimed it is “unacceptable” that governmental agencies were unable to read messages protected by WhatsApp’s end-to-end encryption, and in an interview given to the BBC on Sunday 26th March, intimated that she would consider pursuing the enactment of new legislation which would require the providers of encrypted messaging services to grant access to the UK intelligence agencies. This sentiment has since broadly been endorsed by the UK government.’

Full story

UK Constitutional Law Association, 25th April 2017

Source: www.ukconstitutionallaw.org

Comments Off on Henry Pearce: Some Thoughts on the Encryption Regulatory Debate – UK Constitutional Law Association

London residents overlooked by Tate Modern extension suing gallery for breach of human rights – The Independent

Posted April 21st, 2017 in human tissue, news, privacy by tracey

‘Residents in a block of multi-million pound flats overlooked by a Tate Modern viewing platform are suing the gallery, arguing that their human rights are being breached by “near constant surveillance”.’

Full story

The Independent, 20th April 2017

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Comments Off on London residents overlooked by Tate Modern extension suing gallery for breach of human rights – The Independent

Supreme Court dismisses media publishers’ appeals against costs awards – OUT-LAW.com

‘The UK’s highest court has dismissed the appeals of three media publishers against costs orders made against them by High Court judges in separate libel and privacy cases.’

Full story

OUT-LAW.com, 18th April 2017

Source: www.out-law.com

Comments Off on Supreme Court dismisses media publishers’ appeals against costs awards – OUT-LAW.com

Snooping by police to be monitored by independent authority – The Guardian

‘A new independent surveillance procedure to prevent police officers granting themselves permission to access personal emails and records of web-browsing history is being established by the government.’

Full story

The Guardian, 28th March 2017

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Comments Off on Snooping by police to be monitored by independent authority – The Guardian

WhatsApp must be accessible to authorities, says Amber Rudd – The Guardian

‘Amber Rudd has called for the police and intelligence agencies to be given access to WhatsApp and other encrypted messaging services to thwart future terror attacks, prompting opposition politicians and civil liberties groups to say her demand was unrealistic and disproportionate.’

Full story

The Guardian, 26th March 2017

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Comments Off on WhatsApp must be accessible to authorities, says Amber Rudd – The Guardian

SRA decision to hold board meetings in private “may breach Legal Services Act” – Legal Futures

‘The decision by the Solicitors Regulation Authority to close its meetings to public and press scrutiny appears to be contrary to its obligations under the Legal Services Act 2007 (LSA), a leading regulatory solicitor has said.’

Full story

Legal Futures, 13th March 2017

Source: www.legalfutures.com

Comments Off on SRA decision to hold board meetings in private “may breach Legal Services Act” – Legal Futures

Recent ruling a reminder that journalistic defence can defeat data protection breach claims, says expert – OUT-LAW.com

‘ A ruling by the High Court in London last month highlights the special rules that publishers can rely on under UK data protection law to defeat claims that they have processed personal data unlawfully.’

Full story

OUT-LAW.com, 8th March 2017

Source: www.out-law.com

Comments Off on Recent ruling a reminder that journalistic defence can defeat data protection breach claims, says expert – OUT-LAW.com

Row erupts after rich pensioner erects barricade to block off neighbour’s £2m home – Daily Telegraph

Posted March 3rd, 2017 in damages, injunctions, news, privacy, right to light by tracey

‘A rich pensioner is locked in a bizarre neighbours war with a cutting-edge architect and her partner, after erecting a huge wooden barricade that blocks off the windows and back door of their innovative £2 million house.’

Full story

Daily Telegraph, 2nd March 2017

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Comments Off on Row erupts after rich pensioner erects barricade to block off neighbour’s £2m home – Daily Telegraph

Planned ‘cookie law’ update will exacerbate problems of old law, says expert – OUT-LAW.com

Posted March 1st, 2017 in consent, EC law, internet, news, privacy by sally

‘Newly proposed reforms to EU ePrivacy rules could exacerbate problems that stem from existing rules governing the use of ‘cookies’.’

Full story

OUT-LAW.com, 28th February 2017

Source: www.out-law.com

Comments Off on Planned ‘cookie law’ update will exacerbate problems of old law, says expert – OUT-LAW.com

Knowing where your data is processed in the cloud not central to exercising control over it, says expert – OUT-LAW.com

‘It should not be obligatory for banks in the UK to pre-agree where their data will be processed and stored when contracting with cloud service providers.’

Full story

OUT-LAW.com, 13th February 2017

Source: www.out-law.com

Comments Off on Knowing where your data is processed in the cloud not central to exercising control over it, says expert – OUT-LAW.com

Defamation and data protection: hand-in-glove – Panopticon

Posted January 30th, 2017 in data protection, defamation, news, privacy, proportionality by sally

‘Suppose you publish a statement about me to which I object. Can I sue you for both defamation and data protection breaches based on the same set of facts? Or should that sort of ‘doubling up’ be prohibited as a disproportionate attempt to achieve the same objective in different ways?’

Full story

Panopticon, 27th January 2017

Source: www.panopticonblog.com

Comments Off on Defamation and data protection: hand-in-glove – Panopticon

G4S filmed asylum seekers in their own homes without consent – The Guardian

‘Information commissioner raises concern and campaigners threaten legal action over security firm’s use of body-worn cameras.’

Full story

The Guardian, 24th January 2017

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Comments Off on G4S filmed asylum seekers in their own homes without consent – The Guardian

Anonymity – London Review of Books

‘Anonymous and pseudonymous publication has a long history. It may now be the exception in literary and specialist journalism, but at the start of the 19th century it was pretty much the rule – to the extent that France in 1850 legislated to forbid the publication of unsigned articles on philosophical, political and religious subjects. A new book by Eric Barendt, Anonymous Speech: Literature, Law and Politics (Hart, £25), traces the contemporaneous voluntary abandonment of anonymity in England and the often pompous arguments that accompanied it. The fact was that journals’ recruitment of well-known writers – Thackeray, Dickens – was starting to put a premium on names. So when the Fortnightly Review started up in 1865, it announced that all its articles would be signed and free of editorial pressure. By contrast, from its foundation in 1913 the New Statesman anonymised its contributors, though the editor, having explained that this was necessary in order to establish a common style and tone, couldn’t resist announcing that Sidney Webb and Bernard Shaw would be writing for it. In 1925 the Spectator, after not quite a hundred years of unsigned articles, abandoned anonymity, and the New Statesman followed. Articles in the TLS remained anonymous until 1974, and obituaries in the Times and Telegraph are unsigned to this day. So are the entirety of the Economist and the bulk of Private Eye.’

Full story

London Review of Books, 19th January 2017

Source: www.lrb.co.uk

Comments Off on Anonymity – London Review of Books

Home Office refuses to enforce privacy code on NHS staff using video – The Guardian

Posted January 19th, 2017 in health, hospitals, news, privacy, video recordings by tracey

‘The government has rejected a request by the surveillance camera watchdog to allow it to monitor the increasing and unregulated use of CCTV and body-worn video cameras in hospitals.’

Full story

The Guardian, 18th January 2017

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Comments Off on Home Office refuses to enforce privacy code on NHS staff using video – The Guardian

UK counter-terror laws most Orwellian in Europe, says Amnesty – The Guardian

Posted January 18th, 2017 in investigatory powers, news, privacy, proportionality, terrorism by sally

‘The UK is leading a Europe-wide “race to the bottom” with Orwellian counter-terrorism measures that seriously threaten human rights, according to a comparative survey of security laws by Amnesty International.’

Full story

The Guardian, 17th January 2017

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Comments Off on UK counter-terror laws most Orwellian in Europe, says Amnesty – The Guardian

Liberty launches legal challenge to ‘state spying’ in snooper’s charter – The Guardian

Posted January 10th, 2017 in interception, internet, investigatory powers, news, privacy, telecommunications by sally

‘Human rights campaign group Liberty has launched a crowdfunded legal challenge to the “sweeping state spying powers” in the newly enacted Investigatory Powers Act, which has been dubbed the snooper’s charter.’

Full story

The Guardian, 10th January 2017

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Comments Off on Liberty launches legal challenge to ‘state spying’ in snooper’s charter – The Guardian

Section 40: Will the press be forced to pay the costs in court cases – even if they win? – The Independent

Posted January 9th, 2017 in consultations, costs, freedom of expression, media, news, privacy by sally

‘The Big Question: Are press reforms needed in the wake of the phone hacking scandal, or will they prove financially ruinous to some outlets?’

Full story

The Independent, 9th January 2017

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Comments Off on Section 40: Will the press be forced to pay the costs in court cases – even if they win? – The Independent

EU’s highest court delivers blow to UK snooper’s charter – The Guardian

‘“General and indiscriminate retention” of emails and electronic communications by governments is illegal, the EU’s highest court has ruled, in a judgment that could trigger challenges against the UK’s new Investigatory Powers Act – the so-called snooper’s charter.’

Full story

The Guardian, 21st December 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Comments Off on EU’s highest court delivers blow to UK snooper’s charter – The Guardian

The ‘radical’ challenge – Counsel

‘When does the state have the right to interfere in family life on the basis of radical views held by family members? Damian Woodward-Carlton reports on the inherent difficulties arising in the family courts.’

Full story

Counsel, December 2016

Source: www.counselmagazine.co.uk

Comments Off on The ‘radical’ challenge – Counsel

BBC disputes Cliff Richard payout claim over police raid coverage – The Guardian

Posted December 8th, 2016 in BBC, compensation, complaints, media, news, police, privacy by tracey

‘BBC bosses have drawn up a defence case after Sir Cliff Richard took legal action in the wake of reports naming him as a suspected sex offender. They deny the singer is entitled to compensation after publicity about a raid on his home in August 2014. Detail of the BBC’s defence has emerged in paperwork lodged by lawyers at the high court in London pending any court hearings.’

Full story

The Guardian, 7th December 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Comments Off on BBC disputes Cliff Richard payout claim over police raid coverage – The Guardian