Grindr goes to Court (Part II): Individuals’ HIV Status and the Right to Private Life – Oxford Human Rights Hub

‘Part I of this blog examined the protection of an individual’s HIV status under the UK’s data protection regime in the context of ongoing litigation against Grindr. Part II examines the human rights implications of the disclosure of individuals’ HIV status to third parties in the European human rights context.’

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Oxford Human Rights Hub, 5th June 2024

Source: ohrh.law.ox.ac.uk

Grindr goes to Court (Part I): UK Data Protection Law and the Disclosure of Individuals’ HIV Status – Oxford Human Rights Hub

‘A case brought in April 2024 before the High Court of England and Wales alleges that Grindr shared sensitive information, including users’ HIV status, with third parties for commercial purposes in breach of the UK’s data protection regime. Grindr is an LGBT+ social networking and dating app with a reputation for facilitating casual sexual encounters between gay men. On their profiles, Grindr users are able to share personal health information, including their HIV status. Sharing such information before sexual intercourse is important since, in England and Wales, the transmission of a sexually-transmitted infection, such as HIV, when a sexual partner did not consent to the risk of infection can be prosecuted under the Offences Against the Person Act 1861 (see section 71 of the Domestic Abuse Act 2021).’

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Oxford Human Rights Hub, 4th June 2024

Source: ohrh.law.ox.ac.uk

Rebekah Vardy and Coleen Rooney’s ‘Wagatha Christie’ case returns to High Court – The Independent

Posted May 29th, 2024 in costs, defamation, media, news, privacy, sport by tracey

‘Rebekah Vardy and Coleen Rooney have taken the “Wagatha Christie” case back to court for a further hearing over soaring costs.’

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The Independent, 28th May 2024

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Data, disclosure and duties: balancing privacy and safeguarding in the context of UK university student sexual misconduct complaints – Legal Studies

‘The past decade has seen a marked shift in the regulatory landscape of UK higher education. Institutions are increasingly assuming responsibility for preventing campus sexual misconduct, and are responding to its occurrence through – amongst other things – codes of (mis)conduct, consent and/or active bystander training, and improved safety and security measures. They are also required to support victim-survivors in continuing with their education, and to implement fair and robust procedures through which complaints of sexual misconduct are investigated, with sanctions available that respond proportionately to the seriousness of the behaviour and its harms. This paper examines the challenges and prospects for the success of university disciplinary processes for sexual misconduct. It focuses in particular on how to balance the potentially conflicting rights to privacy held by reporting and responding parties within proceedings, while respecting parties’ rights to equality of access to education, protection from degrading treatment, due process, and the interests of the wider campus community. More specifically, we explore three key moments where private data is engaged: (1) in the fact and details of the complaint itself; (2) in information about the parties or circumstances of the complaint that arise during the process of an investigation and/or resultant university disciplinary process; and (3) in the retention and disclosure (to reporting parties or the university community) of information regarding the outcomes of, and sanctions applied as part of, a disciplinary process. We consider whether current data protection processes – and their interpretation – are compatible with trauma-informed practice and a wider commitment to safety, equality and dignity, and reflect on the ramifications for all parties where that balance between rights or interests is not struck.’

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Legal Studies, 3rd May 2024

Source: www.cambridge.org

Government backs amendment to better protect victims’ counselling records – Ministry of Justice

‘New legislation will provide extra protections for victims’ counselling notes during criminal investigations.’

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Ministry of Justice, 23rd April 2024

Source: www.gov.uk

Costs, Actually: A Recap on Offers to Settle – Gatehouse Chambers

‘Hugh Grant has put civil costs on the public radar, in his latest thread on X (formerly Twitter) (via: @HackedOffHugh), concerning the settlement of his privacy claim against The Sun. In one out of a series of posts from the thread on April 17th 2024, Grant wrote, “I don’t want to accept this money or settle. I would love to see all the allegations that they deny tested in court,” and he goes on to write in a subsequent post in the thread: “But the rules around civil litigation mean that if I proceed to trial and the court awards me damages that are even a penny less than the settlement offer, I would have to pay the legal costs of both sides.”’

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Gatehouse Chambers, 23rd April 2024

Source: gatehouselaw.co.uk

Legal academic awarded £30,000 over ‘toxic’ row with ex-colleague – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted April 24th, 2024 in damages, disclosure, internet, news, privacy, universities by tracey

‘A law lecturer has been ordered to pay £22,500 to a former colleague after sharing confidential information that was later made public on social media.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 23rd April 2024

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Creating ‘deepfake’ sexual images to be criminal offence under new legislation – The Independent

Posted April 16th, 2024 in amendments, bills, consent, criminal justice, internet, news, obscenity, privacy by tracey

‘Creating a sexually explicit “deepfake” image is to be made an offence under new legislation, the Ministry of Justice has announced..’

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The Independent, 16th April 2024

Source: www.independent.co.uk

ICO unveils new data protection fining guidance – OUT-LAW.com

Posted March 25th, 2024 in data protection, fines, news, ombudsmen, privacy by tracey

‘The Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) has published new guidance setting out how it will determine penalty notices and calculate fines under the UK General Data Protection Regulation (UK GDPR) and the Data Protection Act 2018 (DPA).’

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OUT-LAW.com, 22nd March 2024

Source: www.pinsentmasons.com

Hundreds of police officer data breach claims struck out – Legal Futures

Posted February 26th, 2024 in costs, damages, data protection, news, pensions, police, privacy, striking out by tracey

‘Hundreds of police officers who brought data breach and misuse of private information claims where their pre-issue costs alone were £1.2m have seen their claims struck out.’

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Legal Futures, 26th February 2024

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

Leisure firm told scanning staff faces is illegal – BBC News

Posted February 23rd, 2024 in employment, enforcement notices, facial mapping, news, privacy by michael

‘The Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) says Serco Leisure has been unlawfully processing the biometric data of more than 2,000 employees at 38 UK leisure facilities.’

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BBC News, 23rd February 2024

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Ofcom rejects Brewdog complaint over BBC documentary – BBC News

Posted February 20th, 2024 in BBC, complaints, freedom of expression, media, news, privacy, public interest by tracey

‘A complaint by Brewdog about a BBC documentary that highlighted allegations of inappropriate behaviour against the beer giant’s chief executive has been rejected by Ofcom.’

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BBC News, 19th February 2024

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Facebook £3bn legal action given go-ahead in London – BBC News

‘A judge has given the go-ahead to a mass legal action against Facebook owner Meta, potentially worth £3bn.’

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BBC News, 15th February 2024

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Prince Harry settles rest of Mirror Group phone-hacking claims – The Guardian

Posted February 9th, 2024 in costs, damages, interception, media, news, privacy, royal family, telecommunications by michael

‘The Duke of Sussex has settled the remaining parts of his phone-hacking claim against the publisher of the Daily Mirror, the high court has heard.’

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The Guardian, 9th February 2024

Source: www.theguardian.com

Prince Harry pursues 115 further phone hacking claims after Mirror victory – The Independent

Posted January 31st, 2024 in costs, interception, media, news, privacy, royal family, telecommunications by tracey

‘A phone hacking case brought by the Duke of Sussex and other celebrities against Mirror Group was “overwhelmingly successful” with demands made for the publisher to pay out nearly £2m in costs, a court heard. Prince Harry’s case against Mirror newspapers remains ongoing as he presses ahead with a further 115 articles that he claims were sourced unlawfully, with decisions on costs reserved until this is determined.’

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The Independent, 30th January 2024

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Met Police arrest 13 people in two days using ‘dystopian’ facial recognition cameras – The Independent

Posted January 25th, 2024 in facial mapping, London, news, police, privacy by sally

‘London’s Metropolitan Police have arrested over a dozen people in two days using controversial Live Facial Recognition technology in Croydon.’

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The Independent, 24th January 2024

Source: www.independent.co.uk

High Court: Mirror’s legal department knew about hacking for years – Legal Futures

Posted December 18th, 2023 in interception, media, news, privacy, royal family, telecommunications by sally

‘The legal department at Mirror Group Newspapers (MGN) was aware of phone hacking far earlier than it admitted, the High Court found last week in the claim brought by Prince Harry.’

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Legal Futures, 18th December 2023

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

Harry wins 15 claims in phone-hacking case against Mirror publisher – BBC News

Posted December 15th, 2023 in compensation, damages, interception, media, news, privacy, royal family, telecommunications by tracey

‘Prince Harry has won 15 claims in his case accusing Mirror Group Newspapers of unlawfully gathering information for stories published about him.’

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BBC News, 15th December 2023

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

NHS England faces lawsuit over patient privacy fears linked to new data platform – The Guardian

Posted November 30th, 2023 in data protection, health, hospitals, news, privacy by sally

‘The NHS has been accused of “breaking the law” by creating a massive data platform that will share information about patients.’

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The Guardian, 30th November 2023

Source: www.theguardian.com

Crunch time for cookie use, watchdog warns – BBC News

‘Some of the UK’s most visited websites could face fines unless they make it clearer that cookies are optional.’

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BBC News, 21st November 2023

Source: www.bbc.co.uk