UK court hears bid to access fertility clinic’s records on dead person – The Guardian

Posted February 21st, 2020 in bereavement, data protection, families, family courts, news, pregnancy by sally

‘A legal action over access to a fertility clinic’s private records concerning the storage of a dead person’s “sperm and/or embryos” is being heard by the family court partly in secret.’

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The Guardian, 19th February 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

What are the rules on workplace surveillance? – BBC News

Posted February 21st, 2020 in computer programs, data protection, employment, human rights, news, privacy, spying by sally

‘Barclays has faced a backlash after it piloted a system that tracked the time employees spent at their desks. The company has since scrapped the system – but how common is workplace surveillance and what lengths are employers allowed to go to monitor their staff?‘

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BBC News, 20th February 2020

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Met Police remove 374 names from gangs matrix – BBC News

Posted February 17th, 2020 in data protection, gangs, news, ombudsmen, police, statistics by sally

‘The Metropolitan Police has removed 374 people from its gangs matrix after the UK’s data watchdog found it breached data protection laws.’

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BBC News, 15th February 2020

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Judge orders MI5 not to delete databanks before end of surveillance trial – The Guardian

Posted February 11th, 2020 in data protection, intelligence services, investigatory powers, news by sally

‘MI5 has been ordered by a senior judge not to delete vast databanks of personal information it is storing pending the outcome of a trial over the legality of its surveillance procedures.’

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The Guardian, 10th February 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Brexit and GDPR – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted February 10th, 2020 in brexit, data protection, EC law, fines, news by sally

‘Brexit has finally been ‘done’ but what can we data protection lawyers look forward to? Can we bin the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) along with our red EU passports?’

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Law Society's Gazette, 10th February 2020

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Flight Risk: Cybersecurity in Aviation – The 36 Group

Posted February 4th, 2020 in airports, computer crime, data protection, encryption, news by sally

‘Cybersecurity is considered one of the top global risks to the world in the next decade. The problem is particularly acute for airports as they play an essential role in the economy and infrastructure of every country. Any incident involving airports would have widespread consequences to the industry, economy and society. The aviation industry finds itself at the heart of a number of regulations on data protection, network and information systems and security and safety.’

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The 36 Group, 3rd February 2020

Source: 36group.co.uk

MI5 May Be Forced To Destroy ‘Unlawfully’ Handled Personal Data – Each Other

Posted February 4th, 2020 in data protection, intelligence services, news, privacy by sally

‘Privacy groups have launched fresh legal challenge to pressure MI5 into destroying personal data which it has handled “unlawfully”.’

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Each Other, 3rd February 2020

Source: eachother.org.uk

Meadowhall facial recognition scheme troubles watchdog – BBC News

Posted January 28th, 2020 in data protection, facial mapping, identification, news, pilot schemes, police by tracey

‘Police involvement in a private landlord’s facial recognition trial has led a regulator to call for government intervention.’

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BBC News, 28th January 2020

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Facial recognition could be ‘spectacular own goal’, police warned amid accuracy concerns – The Independent

Posted January 28th, 2020 in data protection, facial mapping, news, police by tracey

‘Facial recognition could be a “spectacular own goal” for police if it fails to be inaccurate and effective, the government has been warned. MPs raised concerns about the technology after the Metropolitan Police announced the start of live deployments in London.’

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The Independent, 28th January 2020

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Community order for hacker who stole over 10,000 files from Royal Stoke Hospital – Crown Prosecution Service

Posted January 17th, 2020 in community service, computer crime, data protection, hospitals, news, sentencing by tracey

‘A former Royal Stoke Hospital employee, who used malicious software to crack the passwords of his co-workers and access over 10,000 confidential hospital files, has been given a 12-month community order.’

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Crown Prosecution Service, 16th January 2020

Source: www.cps.gov.uk

Dixons Carphone fined £500,000 for massive data breach – The Guardian

Posted January 10th, 2020 in data protection, fines, fraud, news by tracey

‘Dixons Carphone has been hit with the maximum possible fine after the tills in its shops were compromised by a cyber-attack that affected at least 14 million people.’

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The Guardian, 9th January 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

5 UK Human Rights Issues and Trends to Watch in 2020 – Each Other

‘From landmark legal cases to a landslide general election result, and civil disobedience to constitutional upheaval – the UK had no shortage of human rights news stories in 2019.’

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Each Other, 6th January 2020

Source: eachother.org.uk

10 cases that defined 2019 – UK Human Rights Blog

‘And so, we reach the end of another year. And what a year it has been. As well perhaps the most tumultuous period in British politics for decades, this year saw the first ever image taken of a black hole, a victory for the England men’s cricket team at the World Cup, the discovery of a new species of prehistoric small-bodied human in the Philippines and signs that humpback whale numbers in the South Atlantic have bounced back thanks to intensive conservation efforts. And the law? Well, rather a lot has happened really. As the festive season draws near, what better way is there to celebrate than to rewind the clock and relive the 10 cases which have defined 2019?’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 19th December 2019

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Call for Bank of England executive to quit over security breach – BBC News

Posted December 20th, 2019 in audio recordings, banking, computer programs, data protection, news by tracey

‘A former member of the Bank of England has called for the resignation of its chief operating officer after it emerged an audio feed of sensitive information had been leaked to traders.’

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BBC News, 19th December 2019

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Campaigners threaten UK parties with legal action over data processing – The Guardian

Posted December 10th, 2019 in data protection, elections, news, political parties by sally

‘A data rights group has threatened legal action against the Conservatives, Labour and the Liberal Democrats over the parties’ use of personal data ahead of Thursday’s election.’

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The Guardian, 9th December 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

Some you might have missed – Panopticon

Posted December 5th, 2019 in consent, data protection, human rights, immigration, internet, news, privacy by sally

By which we mean: some that we did miss blogging about. With apologies and better late than nevers, here’s a round-up of three recent(ish) cases worthy of note. In R (Open Rights Group) v SSHD digital campaigners Open Rights Group and The3million (campaigning on behalf of so many EU Citizens living in the UK) challenged the immigration exemption – one of the few new features in the DPA 2018 that strengthens the controller’s hand – as incompatible with fundamental charter rights to privacy and protection of personal data. They also contended that it was too broad, vague and lacking in the safeguards required by the parent Article 23 GDPR (which enables Member States to enact domestic exemptions).The exemption follows a formula which is familiar from other exemptions, old and new – processing of personal data relating to some public good is exempt from data subject rights, to the extent that the public good is jeopardised by execise of those rights. The immigration-specific exemption is new – as the Secretary of State’s witness explained [29], ‘where an exemption was required in an immigration context, reliance was placed on the crime exemption contained latterly in s.29 of DPA 1998’. In other words, the Home Office was getting by OK under the old regime, and one aspect of the challenge to the exemption was that the introduction of a measure infringing fundamental rights must be ‘strictly necessary’.

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Panopticon, 5th December 2019

Source: panopticonblog.com

ICO consults on new draft guidance on Subject Access Requests under GDPR – Local Government Lawyer

Posted December 5th, 2019 in codes of practice, consultations, data protection, news, ombudsmen by sally

‘The Information Commissioner has launched a consultation on new draft guidance for organisations on how to handle Subject Access Requests (SARs) under the GDPR.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 4th December 2019

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Information watchdog updates guidance for data controllers on protecting ‘special category data’ – Local Government Lawyer

Posted November 18th, 2019 in codes of practice, data protection, local government, news, ombudsmen, privacy by sally

‘The ICO has issued updated guidance on special category data, to which data controllers must give extra protection under the GDPR.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 15th November 2019

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Speech by Sir Geoffrey Vos, The Chancellor of the High Court: the annual COMBAR lecture – Courts and Tribunals Judiciary

‘Speech by Sir Geoffrey Vos, The Chancellor of the High Court: the annual COMBAR lecture.’

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Courts and Tribunals Judiciary, 13th November 2019

Source: www.judiciary.uk

Department for Education flouted rules when it secretly shared pupil data with Home Office, says watchdog – The Independent

Posted November 14th, 2019 in data protection, government departments, immigration, news, school children by tracey

‘The Department for Education (DfE) flouted data protection obligations when it shared information about children with the Home Office for immigration enforcement purposes, a watchdog had said.’

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The Independent, 14th November 2019

Source: www.independent.co.uk