European Commission approval for the ‘adequacy’ status of our data protection laws has been welcomed by the government. But is the UK making the wrong choice of regimes? – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted February 22nd, 2021 in brexit, data protection, EC law, news by tracey

‘Last week’s news that the European Commission is to approve the treasured ‘adequacy’ status of UK data protection laws came as a relief to much of the legal sector. Apart from allowing businesses to continue sharing personal data across the EU when the current bridging agreement expires in June, adequacy status also helps with law enforcement and other matters where cross-border co-operation is vital.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 22nd February 2021

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Markle judgment warns against ‘Micawber’ tactics – Law Society’s Gazette

‘The High Court has sounded a new warning about “Micawber tactics” in a summary judgment in the high-profile action brought by the Duchess of Sussex (Meghan Markle) against the Mail newspaper. Lord Justice Warby, sitting as a judge in the Chancery Division, found that the duchess had a reasonable expectation of privacy when she wrote a personal letter to her father, even though she feared it might be leaked to the press.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 12th February 2021

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Meghan wins privacy case against Mail on Sunday – The Guardian

Posted February 12th, 2021 in copyright, damages, data protection, media, news, privacy, royal family by tracey

‘The Duchess of Sussex has won her high court privacy case against the Mail on Sunday, hailing her victory as a “comprehensive win” over the newspaper’s “illegal and dehumanising practices”.’

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The Guardian, 11th February 2021

Source: www.theguardian.com

Defendants no longer required to state nationality at the start of criminal cases – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted February 10th, 2021 in case management, criminal procedure, data protection, human rights, news by sally

‘On 8 February 2020, small but significant changes were made to the Part 3 (Case Management) of the Criminal Procedure Rules and Practice Directions 2020 (“CrimPR”). These changes remove the requirement that defendants in criminal trials provide their nationality to the court at preliminary hearings. The question is now to be asked only where a court passes an immediate or suspended custodial sentence.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 9th February 2021

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

£1m cost of advertising for claimants is not recoverable, judge rules – Law Society’s Gazette

‘Lawyers leading group litigation against British Airways have been told they cannot expect the defendant to pay the £1m costs of advertising for claimants if the action succeeds.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 8th February 2021

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Domestic abuse victims stalked as family courts share refuge addresses with ex-partners, commissioner warns – The Independent

‘The family courts are putting domestic abuse victims and children at grave risk by sharing the secret addresses of shelters with the abusive ex-partner they are fleeing, and some survivors are suffering stalking as a result, London’s independent victims’ commissioner has warned.’

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The Independent, 7th February 2021

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Domestic Abuse Bill: calls for data ‘firewall’ to protect migrant women – Law Society’s Gazette

‘The government has been urged to remove ‘blind spots’ in the Domestic Abuse Bill that could deter migrant women from reporting domestic abuse to the police for fear of being deported or enable perpetrators to control their victims.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 3rd February 2021

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Radicalisation and retention: how long can the police hold data about a person allegedly vulnerable to radicalisation? – UK Police Law Blog

Posted January 29th, 2021 in data protection, equality, human rights, Islam, news, police, privacy, proportionality, terrorism by tracey

‘If concerns are raised that a person might be vulnerable to radicalisation, how long can a police force hold data about that person? This was the question facing the High Court in the case of R (II) v Commissioner of Police for the Metropolis [2020] EWHC 2528 (Admin), which held that the police’s continued retention of data a sixteen year old was contrary to the Data Protection Act 2018 and article 8. In finding this, the court held that a force’s retention of data must be proportionate, what is proportionate in any given situation is fact-specific and that when the police cease to be able to identify a policing purpose for continued retention of personal data, it should be deleted.’

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UK Police Law Blog, 28th January 2021

Source: ukpolicelawblog.com

UK regulator to write to WhatsApp over Facebook data sharing – The Guardian

Posted January 27th, 2021 in data protection, internet, news, privacy, select committees by sally

‘The UK’s data regulator is writing to WhatsApp to demand that the chat app does not hand user data to Facebook, as millions worldwide continue to sign up for alternatives such as Signal and Telegram to avoid forthcoming changes to its terms of service.’

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The Guardian, 26th January 2021

Source: www.theguardian.com

Data-sharing safeguards: no ‘micro-managing’ – Panopticon

Posted January 26th, 2021 in data protection, EC law, news, police, privacy, young persons by sally

‘Data-sharing arrangements between one controller and another proliferate across all sorts of processing contexts, aimed at all sorts of purposes. If those arrangements are to comply with the GDPR and/or DPA 2018, they need to be structured so as to ensure that the data-sharing satisfies the data protection principles. This includes having “appropriate technical and organisational measures” in place. So far, so clear. But how do you assess whether your measures are “appropriate”? And if push comes to shove, how will a court approach that assessment?’

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Panopticon, 25th January 2021

Source: panopticonblog.com

Police force wins appeal over sharing of information about teenager with local crime reduction partnership – Local Government Lawyer

Posted January 22nd, 2021 in appeals, data protection, disclosure, judicial review, news, police, privacy, young persons by sally

‘A teenager has failed in a judicial review of how information on her was shared between Sussex Police and the Brighton & Hove Business Crime Reduction Partnership.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 21st January 2021

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

High Court grants girl anonymity in TikTok representative action – Litigation Futures

Posted January 8th, 2021 in anonymity, children, damages, data protection, internet, news, privacy by tracey

‘A High Court judge has granted anonymity to a 12-year-old girl, allowing the Children’s Commissioner, as her litigation friend, to bring a breach of privacy action against social media platform TikTok.’

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Litigation Futures, 7th January 2021

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

Migrant domestic abuse victims’ data must not be shared between police and Home Office, report warns – The Independent

‘Police and government must urgently introduce measures to stop police sharing domestic abuse victims’ immigration data with the Home Office, a major new report has warned.
Campaigners have routinely voiced fears women with unsettled immigration status who are suffering domestic violence are often too fearful to report the abuse due to fears police will share their data with the Home Office and they will face deportation.’

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The Independent, 17th December 2020

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Information commissioner gets busy with fines – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted December 8th, 2020 in data protection, EC law, fines, news by sally

‘General Data Protection Regulation fines are like a number 65 bus: you wait for a long time and then three arrive at once. In the space of a month the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) has issued three monetary penalty notices. All relate to breaches of GDPR’s security requirements as set out in articles 5 and 32.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 7th December 2020

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

High Court refuses to strike out solicitor’s surveillance harassment claim – Legal Futures

‘The High Court has refused to strike out claims of harassment brought by a solicitor and his wife over surveillance of them carried out at the instruction of a former client.’

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Legal Futures, 30th November 2020

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

‘Antiquated process’: data regulator on obtaining Cambridge Analytica warrant – The Guardian

Posted November 25th, 2020 in auditors, data protection, fines, internet, news, privacy, select committees, warrants by sally

‘The information commissioner has criticised the “antiquated process” that led to Facebook getting hold of Cambridge Analytica’s servers before the UK regulator itself, and renewed calls for an international approach to data privacy to tackle the emerging threat of data havens.’

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The Guardian, 24th November 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

How Your Boss Could Be Spying On You At Home – And What Your Rights Are – Each Other

‘There are reports of bosses in some parts of the world downloading programs which screenshot their staffs’ computers at regular intervals to monitor their productivity.’

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Each Other, 19th November 2020

Source: eachother.org.uk

Data protection – ICO’s new guidance on data subject access requests – OUT-LAW.com

Posted November 6th, 2020 in codes of practice, data protection, employment, news by tracey

‘Leanne Francis comments on the ICO’s new guidance on handling data subject access requests from employees.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 5th November 2020

Source: www.pinsentmasons.com

Court of Appeal affirms importance of data in horseracing case – OUT-LAW.com

Posted November 4th, 2020 in appeals, data protection, news, sport, third parties, unlawful means conspiracy by tracey

‘The Court of Appeal in London has strengthened the tools available to rights holders when seeking to control and exploit commercially valuable data within sport and set out the pitfalls for third parties who seek to do the same without clear, unambiguous approval from a rights holder.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 3rd November 2020

Source: www.pinsentmasons.com

ICO fine for British Airways lands at £20m – Panopticon

Posted October 19th, 2020 in airlines, coronavirus, data protection, fines, news, ombudsmen by sally

‘Ever since the Information Commissioner issued British Airways with a notice proposing to impose a massive fine of £183.39m for a data breach incident in 2018, we have all be waiting with bated breath to see how that process would conclude. A fine at that level would have been the largest ever issued by a data protection regulator in Europe, and would have dwarfed the eye-watering €50m proposed by the French data protection authority CNIL in respect of Google’s advertisement personalisation practices, affecting millions of French citizens. The prospect of BA, a corporate victim of a criminal cyber-attack affecting around 400,000 people’s (mostly payment-card) data, being subject to fine in excess of 4x as large certainly grabbed the headlines.’

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Panopticon, 19th October 2020

Source: panopticonblog.com