30 years of the Child Support Act – House of Commons Library

Posted July 21st, 2021 in children, divorce, families, financial provision, legal history, news, parliament by sally

‘The UK’s formal system for child support arrangements between separated families, without involving the courts, is provided by the Child Maintenance Service (CMS). This succeeded the Child Support Agency (CSA), first established in 1993 with the Child Support Act 1991.’

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House of Commons Library, 20th July 2021

Source: commonslibrary.parliament.uk

Judicial review: Plan to reform scrutiny by courts revealed – BBC News

‘The government is pressing ahead with plans to limit how the public can legally challenge official decisions, despite fears it will damage justice.’

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BBC News, 21st July 2021

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Tory MPs suspended for trying to influence judge in Elphicke case – The Guardian

‘Several Conservative MPs will be suspended from the Commons for a day and told to apologise for trying to influence a judge presiding over the trial of a colleague for sexual assault, the standards committee has ordered.’

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The Guardian, 21st July 2021

Source: www.theguardian.com

Building Safety Bill – Commons Library Research Briefing

‘Second Reading of the Building Safety Bill (Bill 132 of 2021-22) is expected to take place on Wednesday 21 July.’

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House of Commons Library, 16th July 2021

Source: commonslibrary.parliament.uk

Article 31 of the Refugee Convention – Commons Library Research Briefing

Posted July 19th, 2021 in asylum, bills, immigration, news, parliament, refugees by michael

‘Article 31 of the 1951 Refugee Convention is concerned with “refugees unlawfully in the country of refuge”.’

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House of Commons Library, 15th July 2021

Source: commonslibrary.parliament.uk

Nationality and Borders Bill 2021-22 – Commons Library Research Briefing

‘The Nationality and Borders Bill of 2021-22 was introduced to the House on 6 July. Second reading will take place on 19 and 20 July.’

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House of Commons Library, 15th July 2021

Source: commonslibrary.parliament.uk

Research Briefing: Statutory commissions of inquiry: the Inquiries Act 2005 – House of Commons Library

Posted July 12th, 2021 in inquiries, news, parliament by tracey

‘A briefing paper explaining the Inquiries Act 2005, issues arising from the holding of statutory public inquiries, and summary notes on the progress of active statutory inquiries.’

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House of Commons Library, 8th July 2021

Source: commonslibrary.parliament.uk

‘English votes for English laws’ to be scrapped in government bid to revive the Union – The Independent

Posted July 9th, 2021 in bills, devolution, news, parliament, Scotland by michael

‘The law designed to prevent Scottish MPs from voting down legislation affecting England only will be axed, in a new government bid to revive the Union.’

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The Independent, 8th July 2021

Source: www.independent.co.uk

‘No justification’ for changing Human Rights Act, government told – The Independent

Posted July 9th, 2021 in human rights, news, parliament, select committees by tracey

‘There is “absolutely no justification” for the government to change the Human Rights Act, a parliamentary inquiry has found.’

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The Independent, 8th July 2021

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Jeremy Corbyn investigated by parliament’s sleaze watchdog over legal support – The Independent

Posted July 9th, 2021 in legal representation, news, parliament, political parties, standards by tracey

‘Jeremy Corbyn is under investigation by parliament’s sleaze watchdog following allegations he did not properly declare financial support given to him for legal disputes related to antisemitism claims.’

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The Independent, 8th July 2021

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Policing Bill: MPs vote for ‘draconian’ protest laws despite mounting opposition – The Independent

Posted July 6th, 2021 in bills, demonstrations, human rights, news, parliament, police by tracey

‘MPs have voted for “draconian” protest laws in spite of mounting warnings over human rights and questions over whether police want or need the powers.’

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The Independent, 5th July 2021

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Knife, Stone, Paper – Stephen Sedley – London Review of Books

‘Working​ in 2010 on a knotty judgment about the power of the home secretary to include additional criteria in immigration rules that she had previously laid before Parliament as required by statute, something clicked in my memory. Four centuries earlier, in 1611, in a decision known as the Case of Proclamations, it had been ruled that “the King by his proclamation or other ways cannot change any part of the common law, or statute law, or the customs of the realm … The King hath no prerogative, but that which the law of the land allows him.” It gave a key to the question, since immigration rules are made, without need of statutory authority, under the prerogative power to control entry into the realm, a power which is itself part of the common law and subject to its constraints. It was so when Elizabeth I’s autocratic successor, James I and VI, wanted to rule by proclamation; it was so in 2010 when Theresa May wanted to use the royal prerogative to bypass Parliament; it was still so in 2017 when it was proposed that the UK leave the EU by ministerial fiat rather than parliamentary authority, and again in 2019 when Elizabeth II was required by Boris Johnson to prorogue Parliament for no recognised reason.’

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London Review of Books, 1st July 2021

Source: www.lrb.co.uk

Businessman jailed for a year over ‘vile’ threats to MPs who criticised Brexit – The Independent

Posted June 21st, 2021 in brexit, imprisonment, malicious communications, news, parliament by tracey

‘A businessman who sent death threats to MPs in a series of emails warning them not to block Brexit has been jailed for 12 months.’

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The Independent, 19th June 2021

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Research Briefing: General debate: Misuse of Drugs Act – House of Commons Library

Posted June 17th, 2021 in drug abuse, drug offences, medicines, news, parliament, statistics by sally

‘This year marks the fiftieth anniversary of the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971, the main piece of legislation through which illicit drugs are controlled across the UK.’

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House of Commons Library, 16th June 2021

Source: commonslibrary.parliament.uk

Research Briefing: Unification of probation services – House of Commons Library

Posted June 11th, 2021 in news, parliament, probation by tracey

‘This briefing discusses the new unified model for probation services being brought in from 26 June 2021’

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House of Commons Library , 7th June 2021

Source: commonslibrary.parliament.uk

Research Briefing: Coronavirus: the lockdown laws – House of Commons Library

Posted June 11th, 2021 in coronavirus, news, parliament by tracey

‘This Library briefing paper explains the types of coronavirus restrictions and requirements imposed by the UK’s lockdown laws.’

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House of Commons Library, 10th June 2021

Source: commonslibrary.parliament.uk

Paolo Sandro: Do You Really Mean It? Ouster Clauses, Judicial Review Reform, and the UK Constitutionalism Paradox – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘The Conservative government’s response to the IRAL report has raised plenty of alarm bells from UK constitutional scholars. The widespread observation that the government’s judicial review reform plans appear to go well beyond what the Independent Panel recommended points to a more fundamental problem: that the government seems to proceed from a very partial understanding (at best) of the UK “constitution”.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 1st June 2021

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

Max Taylor: The Dissolution and Calling of Parliament Bill: Missed Opportunities – UK Constitutional Law Association

Posted May 19th, 2021 in bills, constitutional law, news, parliament, prorogation by sally

‘The newly introduced Dissolution and Calling of Parliament Bill (“the Bill”) – like the Draft Fixed-term Parliaments Act (Repeal) Bill which preceded it – is a missed opportunity. It has failed to unify and define the scope and exercise of the powers of proroguing and dissolving Parliament, in one statute, which were in need of clarification post-Miller II. Now that the Government has decided on the form which it would like the Bill repealing the Fixed-term Parliaments Act to take, the moment has gone and, as a niche of constitutional law, it is unlikely to garner enough political capital for these issues to be deemed worth addressing for the meantime.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 18th May 2021

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

Ep 143: Henry VIII Powers undermining parliamentary supremacy – Law Pod UK

‘In this episode, Rosalind English discusses with Sarabjit Singh and Isabel McArdle of 1 Crown Office Row a number of laws containing “Henry VIII” powers which allow ministers to avoid full parliamentary debate.’

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Law Pod UK, 4th May 2021

Source: audioboom.com

Rodney Brazier: Mr Johnson and His Flat – UK Constitutional Law Association

Posted May 4th, 2021 in ministers' powers and duties, news, parliament, political parties by tracey

‘Let me begin with what should be platitudinous. The presumption of innocence is a cherished legal principle in the United Kingdom. No one is guilty of a crime unless a court so decides after a fair hearing, and anyone accused of wrongdoing short of a crime is entitled to the protection of an analogous principle. Politicians must account to Parliament, and are answerable to the voters. Politicians must obey the law and comply with relevant codes of conduct.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 4th May 2021

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org