Judge calls for clarity on status of ECJ rulings in UK after Brexit – The Guardian

Posted August 8th, 2017 in EC law, judges, judgments, news, parliament, treaties by sally

‘The government must provide clarity on whether it wants UK courts to take into account rulings of the European court of justice after Brexit, one of Britain’s most senior judges has said.’

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The Guardian, 8th August 2017

Source: www.theguardian.com

Online trolling laws under consideration following abuse of MPs – The Independent

‘An investigation into the abuse of MPs and parliamentary candidates is considering whether new laws are needed to protect public servants because of the rise of social media.’

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The Independent, 24th July 2017

Source: www.independent.co.uk

MPs urged to pass law against online ‘catfish’ imposters tricking women into sex – The Independent

Posted July 18th, 2017 in crime, fraud, identity fraud, internet, news, parliament by tracey

‘MPs are to be urged to outlaw the practice of ‘catfishing’, which refers to online predators using fake dating profiles to trick victims into sexual relationships.’

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The Independent, 17th July 2017

Source: www.independent.co.uk

PM orders inquiry into intimidation of MPs during general election – The Guardian

‘Theresa May has ordered an investigation into intimidation experienced by candidates during the last election after a barrage of complaints by MPs about death threats and harassment.’

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The Guardian, 12th July 2017

Source: www.theguardian.com

May’s deal with DUP faces legal challenge from crowdfunding campaign – The Guardian

‘A crowdfunding campaign has been launched to raise funds for a potential legal challenge to Theresa May’s parliamentary deal with the Democratic Unionist party, on the grounds that it breaches the Good Friday agreement.’

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The Guardian, 9th July 2017

Source: www.theguardian.com

Queen’s Speech confirms that unfair rules on logbook loans are being sent to the scrapheap – Law Commission

Posted June 22nd, 2017 in bills, loans, news, parliament, press releases, repossession by tracey

‘The Law Commission welcomes plans outlined in today’s Queen Speech to close a legal loophole which means buyers of second-hand vehicles are at risk of having them repossessed due to unfair logbook loans.’

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Law Commission, 21st June 2017

Source: www.lawcom.gov.uk

Queen’s speech confirms whiplash reform and court modernisation – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted June 22nd, 2017 in bills, courts, electronic filing, news, parliament, personal injuries by tracey

‘Fresh reforms to personal injury claims are back on the agenda following today’s Queen’s speech. The government’s slimmed-down wishlist of legislation includes a Civil Liability Bill to address the ‘compensation culture’ around motor insurance claims.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 21st June 2017

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Queen’s Speech: Chief Inspector of Prisons expresses fury after penal reform dropped from agenda – The Independent

Posted June 22nd, 2017 in bills, news, parliament, prisons by tracey

‘The Chief Inspector of Prisons has expressed fury and disappointment after the Government’s commitment to prison reform, which was given high prominence in 2016, was omitted from the Queen’s Speech.’

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The Independent, 21st June 2017

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Lord Chancellor swearing-in speech: David Lidington – Ministry of Justice

Posted June 21st, 2017 in lord chancellor, Ministry of Justice, news, parliament, speeches by sally

‘Full text of the speech given by the Rt Hon David Lidington at his Lord Chancellor swearing-in ceremony in June 2017.’

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Ministry of Justice, 19th June 2017

Source: www.gov.uk

Breverse: Politically Problematic but Legally Possible, by Rosie Slowe – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted June 15th, 2017 in constitutional law, EC law, elections, news, parliament, treaties by sally

‘On 29 March 2017, Theresa May’s Article 50 letter of notice was delivered to Donald Tusk, thereby formally triggering the Treaty-based process for the UK’s withdrawal from the EU. The question remains: is this trajectory irreversible, or can the UK rescind its notification?’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 14th June 2017

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Kenneth Armstrong: Has Article 50 Really Been Triggered? – UK Constitutional Law Association

Posted June 15th, 2017 in constitutional law, EC law, news, parliament, treaties by sally

‘With the Supreme Court handing down its judgment in Miller v Secretary of State for Exiting the EU on 24 January this year, one might have been forgiven for thinking that the issues around the legality of the triggering of Article 50 had been settled. As we all now know, the Supreme Court decided that Parliament had to give legislative authority for UK ministers lawfully to notify the UK of its intention to withdraw from the EU. The European Union (Notification of Withdrawal) Act 2017 was enacted and the Prime Minister duly wrote President Tusk her Article 50 letter.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 14th June 2017

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

What is the Fixed-term Parliaments Act ? – Daily Telegraph

Posted June 1st, 2017 in constitutional law, elections, legislation, news, parliament, time limits by sally

‘The conditions for when a snap election can be called were significantly restricted by the Fixed-term Parliaments Act of 2011. The Act of Parliament, which was part of the Conservative–Liberal Democrat coalition agreement produced after the 2010 general election, was introduced fixed-term elections to the Westminster parliament.’

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Daily Telegraph, 31st May 2017

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Fixed Term Parliaments Act – OUP Blog

Posted May 31st, 2017 in elections, news, parliament, time limits by sally

‘Was there ever a more hollow and impotent piece of legislation than the UK’s Fixed Term Parliaments Act? Trumpeted by the Conservative-led coalition as a way of stopping opportunist prime ministers ever again calling snap elections to capitalize on hefty poll leads – by complicating simple confidence votes in ways that prompted Labour to condemn it as a constitutional “stitch-up” – within six short years of receiving Royal Assent it has proved itself wholly incapable of doing any such thing. When it suited David Cameron to build a protective cordon around his unholy alliance with the Liberal Democrats, the Act was a useful confection: a road-block solid enough to stop either partner provoking an early return to the polls, by swerving out of the ministerial motorcade in a petulant huff. But the fact it could be so casually swept aside as soon as the Tories’ stars were back in the ascendancy – like a trifling traffic cone in the residents’ parking bay otherwise reserved for them outside Number 10 Downing Street – shows it wasn’t worth the statute-book it was written on. We should repeal this zombie law at the earliest opportunity.’

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OUP Blog, 31st May 2017

Source: blog.oup.com

Robert Craig: Zombie Prerogatives Should Remain Decently Buried: Replacing the Fixed-term Parliaments Act 2011 (Part 1) – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘In the light of widespread dissatisfaction with the Fixed-term Parliaments Act 2011 (‘FTPA’), the Conservative party manifesto states, at page 43, “We will repeal the Fixed-term Parliaments Act”. This post explores the constitutional implications if, as seems likely, the Conservative Government continues to command a majority in the House of Commons after the election and seeks to convince Parliament to repeal the Act.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 24th May 2017

Source: www.ukconstitutionallaw.org

Brexit may cost MPs and peers the power to pass laws, says former judge – The Guardian

‘The “legislative tsunami” unleashed by Brexit will deliver the “greatest challenge” in history to the integrity of parliament’s procedures, a former lord chief justice has said. Lord Judge raised his concerns that by the time Brexit is completed and the “great repeal bill” enacted, MPs and peers will have effectively given away their powers to pass laws.’

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The Guardian, 3rd May 2017

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Eirik Bjorge: The Dualist System of the English Constitution and the Victorian Acquis – UK Constitutional Law Association

Posted May 2nd, 2017 in constitutional law, news, parliament, treaties by sally

‘The Supreme Court in Miller set out the model that ‘the dualist system is a necessary corollary of Parliamentary sovereignty’ (para 57), or in the words of Campbell McLachlan in his admirable Foreign Relations Law, cited by the Supreme Court:

“If treaties have no effect within domestic law, Parliament’s legislative supremacy within its own polity is secure. If the executive must always seek the sanction of Parliament in the event that a proposed action on the international plane will require domestic implementation, parliamentary sovereignty is reinforced at the very point at which the legislative power is engaged (para 5.20).”‘

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 28th April 2017

Source: www.ukconstitutionallaw.org

Police and courts fail cyclists over road safety, says cross-party inquiry – The Guardian

‘Policing and the justice system are too often failing cyclists, making the roads too dangerous for people to ride on them, and then not properly prosecuting or banning motorists who commit offences, a cross-party group of MPs and peers has warned.’

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The Guardian, 2nd May 2017

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Robert Hazell: Is the Fixed-term Parliaments Act a Dead Letter? – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘The ease with which Theresa May was able to secure an early dissolution last week has led to suggestions that the Fixed-term Parliaments Act 2011 serves no useful purpose and should be scrapped. Drawing on wider evidence of how fixed-term parliaments legislation works in other countries, Robert Hazell argues that there is a danger that it is being judged prematurely, on the basis of a single episode. Future circumstances in which a Prime Minister seeks a dissolution may be different, and in these cases the Fixed-term Parliaments Act may serve as more of a constraint.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, April 2017

Source: www.ukconstitutionallaw.org

High court orders UK government to explain clean air plan delay – The Guardian

‘The government has been ordered back to the high court to explain its last-minute bid to delay publication of the UK’s clean air plan.’

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The Guardian, 25th April 2017

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Baroness Shields’ speech at the National Security Agency – Home Offcie

Posted April 24th, 2017 in intelligence services, internet, news, parliament, sex discrimination, women by tracey

‘Delivered to the fifth Annual Intelligence Community (IC) Women’s Summit.’

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Home Office, 21st April 2017

Source: www.gov.uk/home-office