Daughters in legal bid for House of Lords seat rights – BBC News

‘Five daughters of hereditary peers are to challenge a law that stops them from being elected to the House of Lords. They are taking the government to the European Court of Human Rights in a bid to end the system of male primogeniture which has resulted in almost all titles being passed to male heirs.’

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BBC News, 16th July 2018

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

MPs’ anti-bullying rules will cover Speaker, Leadsom suggests – The Guardian

Posted July 17th, 2018 in bullying, news, parliament, professional conduct by tracey

‘New rules to stop MPs from bullying and harassing staff will cover the office of the Speaker, meaning that any future complaints about John Bercow would have to be investigated, the leader of the Commons has suggested.’

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The Guardian, 17th July 2018

Source: www.theguardian.com

Stephen Tierney: The Legislative Supremacy of Government – UK Constitutional Law Association

Posted July 4th, 2018 in bills, constitutional law, EC law, news, parliament, prerogative powers by sally

‘At the same time as Parliament prepares to ‘take back control’ from Brussels, the executive is in fact accruing to itself further control over the legislative process. In this post I address a number of trends – only some of which are a direct consequence of the unique circumstances of Brexit – which suggest a deeper realignment of institutional power within the constitution and a consequent diminution of Parliament’s legislative power.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 3rd July 2018

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

Cross-party group of MPs seek to close loophole in upskirting bill – The Guardian

Posted June 29th, 2018 in bills, news, outraging public decency, parliament, photography by tracey

‘A cross-party group of MPs will seek to close a loophole in the government’s upskirting bill that could have allowed people who took images for financial gain or simply for fun to escape justice. The Conservative MP Maria Miller has held discussions with Labour’s Jess Phillips and the Liberal Democrat MP Wera Hobhouse about an amendment that would ensure there was a blanket ban on taking the voyeuristic images whatever the motivation.’

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The Guardian, 29th June 2018

Source: www.theguardian.com

£2.4m spent on House of Commons gagging clauses – BBC News

Posted June 22nd, 2018 in bullying, confidentiality, disclosure, news, parliament by tracey

‘The House of Commons spent £2.4m on “gagging clauses” for former staff since 2013, BBC Newsnight has learned. Fifty-three departing members of the House of Commons Service signed contracts compelling them not to reveal information about the Commons.’

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BBC News, 22nd June 2018

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

The EU Withdrawal Bill in the Commons: Parliament surrendering control? – Oxford Human Rights Hub

Posted June 19th, 2018 in amendments, bills, constitutional reform, EC law, news, parliament by sally

‘Last week, the EU Withdrawal Bill returned to the Commons, so MPs could scrutinise and vote on amendments made to it by the House of Lords. The Bill survived its passage in the House of Commons last year relatively intact, with only one amendment carried against the Government. Things were different, however, in the Lords, where the Government was defeated on 15 substantial amendments.’

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Oxford Human Rights Hub, 18th June 2018

Source: ohrh.law.ox.ac.uk

Carl Sargeant family say they are being excluded from inquiry – The Guardian

‘The family of Carl Sargeant have claimed they are being excluded from an inquiry into the circumstances surrounding his sacking as a Welsh minister four days before he took his own life.’

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The Guardian, 18th June 2018

Source: www.theguardian.com

Francis Young: Parliament and Taking Back Control: A Precedent from the Maastricht Debates – UK Constitutional Law Association

Posted June 18th, 2018 in bills, constitutional law, EC law, news, parliament, referendums, treaties by sally

‘This post considers whether it is a convention of the British constitution that Parliament cannot direct the executive in the making of treaties. The context, of course, is the current tussle over whether the European Union (Withdrawal) Bill should be amended to allow the House of Commons a “meaningful vote” on the outcome of the current negotiations with the EU.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 15th June 2018

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

MPs condemn Home Office deportation threats over taxes – The Guardian

Posted June 14th, 2018 in deportation, mistake, news, parliament, taxation, terrorism by tracey

‘Caroline Nokes, the immigration minister, has been accused by MPs of either not having a grip on her department or being recklessly incompetent for allowing the use of counter-terrorism powers to force the removal of highly skilled migrants from the UK over their taxes.’

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The Guardian, 13th June 2018

Source: www.theguardian.com

Jack Simson Caird: Parliament’s Right to a ‘Meaningful Vote’: Amendments to the EU (Withdrawal) Bill – UK Constitutional Law Association

Posted June 12th, 2018 in amendments, bills, constitutional reform, EC law, news, parliament, treaties by sally

‘On Tuesday 12 June 2018, the Government will ask the House of Commons to reject the Lords’ meaningful vote amendment to the EU (Withdrawal) Bill (Lords Amendment 19). If the amendment is rejected, the Government will ask the Commons to accept its own alternative version, known as an ‘amendment in lieu’. If either amendment is enacted, and the Commons uses its veto to reject the Withdrawal Agreement, this would be a constitutionally unprecedented situation. This post looks at the Government’s ‘amendment in lieu’, and the features that distinguish it from the Lords’ amendment.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 11th June 2018

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

Let battle commence: Labour, Lib Dems and top judges bid to reduce impact of whiplash reforms – Legal Futures

Posted June 12th, 2018 in bills, news, parliament, personal injuries by sally

‘Opposition peers and leading legal figures will today try and curb the government’s whiplash reforms as the Civil Liability Bill enters its crucial report stage.’

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Legal Futures, 12th June 2018

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

MPs and peers call for judge-led inquiry into UK rights abuses – The Guardian

Posted June 12th, 2018 in human rights, inquiries, news, parliament, rendition, torture by sally

‘An all-party group of MPs and peers has written to Theresa May demanding a judge-led inquiry into the UK’s role in human rights abuses since September 11.’

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The Guardian, 11th June 2018

Source: www.theguardian.com

John Bercow will not be investigated over ‘stupid woman’ row – The Guardian

‘John Bercow, the Speaker of the House of Commons, will not be investigated by the standards watchdog over allegations that he described the cabinet minister Andrea Leadsom as a “stupid woman”.’

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The Guardian, 4th June 2018

Source: www.theguardian.com

MP calls for parliamentary inquiry into Garden Bridge – BBC News

Posted May 30th, 2018 in budgets, inquiries, London, news, parliament, transport by sally

‘An MP has called for a parliamentary inquiry into the Garden Bridge project over concerns Transport for London (TfL) may have been misled to secure £7m of its funding.’

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BBC News, 26th May 2018

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

John Bercow: Probe into Commons Speaker bullying claims blocked – The Independent

‘A probe into allegations John Bercow bullied members of staff has been blocked by MPs. The Commons Standards Committee voted three-two against allowing Parliament’s watchdog to investigate the claims.’

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The Independent, 17th May 2018

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Lords overturn MPs with vote for second Leveson inquiry – The Guardian

Posted May 15th, 2018 in corruption, inquiries, media, news, parliament by sally

‘The House of Lords has once again voted to establish a fresh Leveson-style public inquiry into the conduct of the media, overturning a decision made by MPs last week and setting up another showdown with the government.’

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The Guardian, 14th May 2018

Source: www.theguardian.com

Lords could defy government over Leveson inquiry – The Guardian

Posted May 11th, 2018 in inquiries, media, news, parliament by sally

‘The battle to establish a new Leveson-style inquiry into the media could continue next week, with peers weighing up whether to overturn the House of Commons’ decision that there is no need for another investigation into the activities of the press.’

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The Guardian, 10th May 2018

Source: www.theguardian.com

Veronika Fikfak and Hayley J. Hooper: Whither the War Powers Convention? What Next for Parliamentary Control of Armed Conflict after Syria? – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘On Friday 13 April 2018 the Royal Air Force participated in air strikes (together with the United States and France) to degrade the Syrian regime’s chemical weapons capability and to deter further chemical attacks. This intervention in Syria was not authorised by the UN Security Council, nor was the involvement of British troops approved by the House of Commons. Instead, the decision to send British forces to Syria was made by The Prime Minister Theresa in conjunction with the Cabinet. Readers can view her public statement from 14 April 2018 here. Events unfolded this way despite governmental acknowledgement of a War Powers Convention in the 2011 Cabinet Manual.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 20th April 2018

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

MPs demand action over Jehovah’s Witness abuse allegations – The Guardian

Posted March 27th, 2018 in child abuse, complaints, news, parliament, sexual offences, victims by tracey

‘MPs are demanding government action after more than 100 people contacted the Guardian with allegations of child sexual abuse and other mistreatment in Jehovah’s Witness communities in the UK.’

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The Guardian, 26th March 2018

Source: www.theguardian.com

Helen Newlove: ‘Victims should never be let down by the justice system’ – The Guardian

Posted February 28th, 2018 in criminal justice, news, parliament, victims by sally

‘The victims’ commissioner on her fight for a long-overdue law to get vulnerable people heard.’

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The Guardian, 27th February 2018

Source: www.theguardian.com