Brook House detention centre whistleblower ‘abuse’ inquiry begins – BBC News

‘A public inquiry into the mistreatment of immigration detainees has heard a BBC Panorama documentary revealed “shocking” treatment which had “no place in a decent and humane” system.’

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BBC News, 23rd November 2021

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Frances Haugen to testify to MPs about Facebook and online harm – The Guardian

Posted October 25th, 2021 in bills, bullying, duty of care, fines, harassment, internet, news, whistleblowers by tracey

‘The Facebook whistleblower is to give evidence to MPs and peers scrutinising the online safety bill, amid calls for a toughening up of the landmark legislation.’

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The Guardian, 25th October 2021

Source: www.theguardian.com

Facebook whistleblower claims checked for breach of UK law – BBC News

Posted October 14th, 2021 in children, internet, mental health, news, privacy, whistleblowers by sally

‘The data-privacy watchdog has written to a Facebook whistleblower, requesting her full evidence to see whether the technology company has broken UK law.’

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BBC News, 13th October 2021

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

NHS child gender identity clinic whistleblower wins tribunal – BBC News

‘A woman who raised concerns about the safety of children at an NHS gender clinic has been awarded £20,000 in an employment tribunal case.’

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BBC News, 5th September 2021

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Worcestershire NHS managers knew cancers missed due to X-ray backlog – BBC News

‘Senior managers at an NHS trust knew up to 30 cancers may have gone undetected two years before an official probe into a backlog of thousands of X-rays. Three lung cancers were missed at Worcestershire hospitals NHS Trust, a sample check of results in 2014 found.’

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BBC News, 27th August 2021

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Determining the question of motivation in whistleblowing claims is not always as complicated as it seems – 3PB

‘Prior to her dismissal, the claimant was a senior employee with a continuous unblemished service record of 38 years.’

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3PB, 9th August 2021

Source: www.3pb.co.uk

Reporting restrictions in end of life cases: anonymity for treating clinicians – UK Human Rights Blog

‘The focus of this judgment was on the jurisdiction, if any, that the High Court Family Division has to maintain a Reporting Restriction Order (‘RRO’) prohibiting the naming of any medical clinicians as being involved in the care and treatment of a child who had been the subject of “end of life” proceedings before the High Court prior to their death, and where an RRO had been made at that time preventing the identification of any of the treating clinicians and staff until further order.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 6th July 2021

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

‘Have confidence to speak up’: whistleblowing policy for judges unveiled – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted June 25th, 2021 in codes of practice, judges, judiciary, news, whistleblowers by tracey

‘The lord chief justice and senior president of tribunals want all judges to feel confident to speak up about any wrongdoing, according to a new whistleblowing policy unveiled this week. The 12-page Judicial Whistleblowing Policy: How to report wrongdoing document was published on the judicial intranet on Wednesday.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 25th June 2021

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Employment Tribunals: Interim Relief and the Equality Act 2010: Court of Appeal Declines to Extend the Relief – Littleton Chambers

‘For a few months, a radical change to employment law practice appeared to be in prospect.’

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Littleton Chambers, 16th June 2021

Source: littletonchambers.com

Whistleblowing: causation, guidance for complex cases and judicial proceedings immunity – 3PB

‘In GMP v Aston we receive a helpful reminder of the approach to be applied in cases where there are multiple protected disclosures spanning a significant period and allegations of multiple detriments involving multiple perpetrators and multiple victims. The case also involves an alleged detriment consisting of evidence given in other tribunal proceedings which was subject to judicial proceedings immunity (JPI) and deals with the issue of whether evidence which is covered by JPI can amount to a detriment. Finally, where the issue of JPI had not been raised before the first instance Tribunal, the Appeal Tribunal considered whether it had to deal with this newly argued point (i.e. whether it was mandatory) or whether it had a discretion to consider the newly argued point (i.e. whether it was discretionary). The considerations when deciding whether or not to exercise the discretion are also set out.’

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3PB, 10th June 2021

Source: www.3pb.co.uk

GCHQ’s mass data interception violated right to privacy, court rules – The Guardian

‘The UK spy agency GCHQ’s methods for bulk interception of online communications violated the right to privacy and the regime for collection of data was unlawful, the grand chamber of the European court of human rights has ruled.’

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The Guardian, 25th May 2021

Source: www.theguardian.com

Sapphire House: ‘Anger’ over report into neglect death care home – BBC News

‘The mother of a man who died after suffering neglect said she felt “extreme distress and anger” at a critical new report into his care home.’

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BBC News, 21st April 2021

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Police watchdog accused of skewing report to back protests clampdown – The Guardian

‘The official policing inspectorate showed repeated bias in favour of the police and against peaceful protesters as it compiled a report which backed a government clampdown, a whistleblower has alleged. The complainant says a report on protest released in March this year was skewed in favour of the government view, with conclusions reached before evidence was gathered and assessed.’

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The Guardian, 31st March 2021

Source: www.theguardian.com

Assange cannot be extradited, but free speech arguments dismissed — an extended look – UK Human Rights Blog

‘In The Government of the United States v Julian Assange (2021), the District Judge sitting at Westminster Magistrates’ Court discharged the American extradition request against the founder of WikiLeaks because there is a substantial risk that he would commit suicide. Given Julian Assange’s political notoriety as an avowed whistle-blower, however, the judgment is significant for its dismissal of the defence’s free speech arguments. This article analyses why these human rights submissions were unsuccessful.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 21st January 2021

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Bedford hospital: ‘Risk of baby abduction’ at ‘inadequate’ maternity unit – BBC News

Posted January 15th, 2021 in birth, children, families, hospitals, kidnapping, news, ombudsmen, whistleblowers by tracey

‘Maternity services at a hospital have been downgraded to “inadequate” after inspectors found a “potential risk for baby abduction”. The Care Quality Commission (CQC) inspected Bedford Hospital’s maternity services in November following “14 whistle-blower inquiries”.’

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BBC News, 15 January 2021

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Julian Assange: Wikileaks founder extradition to US blocked by UK judge – BBC News

Posted January 4th, 2021 in disclosure, extradition, mental health, news, suicide, whistleblowers by sally

‘Wikileaks founder Julian Assange cannot be extradited to the United States, a court in London has ruled.’

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BBC News, 4th January 2021

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Whistleblowing time limits: one off acts vs continuing acts – 3PB

Posted November 12th, 2020 in contract of employment, news, time limits, unfair dismissal, whistleblowers by sally

‘Ikejiaku reinforces the distinction between a one-off act and a continuing act in the context of the imposition of a new contract, highlighting that this was a one off act with continuing consequences. Although the case concerned time limits in a whistleblowing detriment claim, the principles will extend across other areas, such as discrimination, in which unlawful detriments form the basis for claims.’

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3PB, 8th October, 2020

Source: www.3pb.co.uk

Whistleblowers’ lawyers “fear retaliation” over NDAs – Legal Futures

‘Lawyers acting for whistleblowers have told MPs and peers that they can feel intimidated to raise concerns over non-disclosure agreements (NDAs) because of the threat of retaliation.’

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Legal Futures, 23rd July 2020

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

Returning from lockdown – Dealing with employee complaints: whistleblowing and the Equality Act – St John’s Buildings

Posted May 29th, 2020 in complaints, coronavirus, employment, news, whistleblowers by sally

‘The country is going to start to try and emerge from the lockdown, which was imposed to try and slow the spread of coronavirus. Guidance provided on 10.05.2020 was that some employees, who cannot work from home, should go to work. Coronavirus is still with us, so the Government has produced guidance on how employers can implement social distancing measures so as to make the workplace safe for its workers. For instance, employers are told that they might consider staggering start times; providing handwashing facilities or hand sanitiser at entrances; reducing congestion by opening multiple entrances, having one-way flow, discouraging non-essential trips; or rearranging workstations. The list goes on, but there are perhaps infinite ways in which employees can be protected in any particular workplace.’

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St John's Buildings, 18th May 2020

Source: stjohnsbuildings.com

Anger as watchdog clears Alzheimer’s Society of wrongdoing – The Guardian

‘The charity watchdog is embroiled in a row with ex-employees of the Alzheimer’s Society after clearing it of wrongdoing, following claims in a Guardian investigation over payouts to workers who signed non-disclosure agreements (NDAs).’

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The Guardian, 4th May 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com