Lucy Bone on Confidentiality Clauses and Sexual Harassment – Littleton Chambers

‘Can an employer rely on a contractual confidentiality clause to prevent disclosure of allegations of harassment and discrimination? This was the question posed in Linklaters v. Mellish [2019] EWHC 177, heard by the High Court last week.’

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Littleton Chambers, 18th February 2019

Source: www.littletonchambers.com

Ep. 65: General Medical Council Appeals – Robert Keller & Jeremy Hyam QC – Law Pod UK

Posted February 13th, 2019 in appeals, disciplinary procedures, doctors, employment, health, news, nurses by sally

‘Taken from our recent seminar, ‘Erasure, Remediation and Rights of Appeal in Disciplinary Proceedings’, Robert Kellar and Jeremy Hyam QC discuss appeals by the general medical council.’

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Law Pod UK, 11th February 2019

Source: audioboom.com

High Court allows more time for steelworker claims – Litigation Futures

‘The High Court has given the personal representatives of deceased steelworkers more time to register their compensation claims under a group litigation order (GLO).’

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Litigation Futures, 7th February 2019

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

What is really being protected in the Linklaters case? – Legal Futures

‘The Linklaters v Mellish case has brought the issue of how law firms deal with sexual harassment, and how the courts deal with confidentiality, back into the spotlight.’

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Legal Futures, 7th February 2019

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

Sacked 88-year-old hospital secretary becomes oldest person ever to win age discrimination case – Daily Telegraph

‘An 88-year-old hospital secretary has become the oldest person ever to win an age discrimination case after she was marched out her office and later dismissed over “frality” claims.’

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Daily Telegraph, 6th February 2019

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Thousands with minor convictions could be allowed to hide them when applying to work in schools and hospitals after a landmark supreme court ruling – Daily Telegraph

Posted January 31st, 2019 in criminal records, disclosure, employment, news, Supreme Court, vetting by tracey

‘Thousands of people with minor or old convictions could be freed from having to declare them to employers in children’s and other services after a landmark supreme court judgement.’

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Daily Telegraph, 30th January 2019

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Online UK right to work checks now illegal working defence – OUT-LAW.com

Posted January 30th, 2019 in documents, employment, immigration, internet, news, penalties by sally

‘UK employers can now rely on the result of an online right to work test as a defence against civil penalties should any of their workers later be found to have been working illegally.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 30th January 2019

Source: www.out-law.com

Philip Green ends ‘gagging order’ legal action against Telegraph – The Guardian

‘Sir Philip Green and his business empire, Arcadia, have ended their legal claim against the Telegraph after the newspaper reported allegations of sexual and racial harassment against him.’

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The Guardian, 28th January 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

Four key messages about EU staff and Brexit – Technology Law Update

Posted January 23rd, 2019 in brexit, EC law, employment, news, treaties by sally

‘The recent vote in the UK House of Commons to reject the EU Withdrawal Agreement may result in additional concern for EU staff and their employers in the tech sector.’

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Technology Law Update, 23rd January 2019

Source: www.technology-law-blog.co.uk

Jess Varnish loses employment tribunal against British Cycling and UK Sport – The Guardian

‘Jess Varnish, the former Great Britain track cyclist, has lost her landmark employment case against British Cycling and UK Sport which had threatened to overhaul funding for Olympic athletes.’

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The Guardian, 16th January 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

Fraud case shows importance of internal investigations – OUT-LAW.com

Posted January 15th, 2019 in confidentiality, contracts, database right, employment, fraud, news, privilege by tracey

‘A recent High Court case demonstrates that companies will usually need to carry out their own internal investigations before being able to successfully obtain certain court orders in cases of suspected employee fraud, an expert has said.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 14th January 2019

Source: www.out-law.com

Fatal accident damages considered: Blake -v- Mad Max Limited – Zenith PI

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Zenith PI, 10th January 2018

Source: zenithpi.wordpress.com

No TUPE protection for most staff shed in Lawyers Inc takeover – Legal Futures

‘Only five out of 22 lawyers and staff who lost their jobs when Hull firm Ingrams collapsed in July 2017 were protected by the TUPE regulations when the firm was effectively taken over by an innovative alternative business structure (ABS), an employment tribunal has ruled.’

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Legal Futures, 8th January 2019

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

Public test of UK settlement scheme for EU nationals to begin – OUT-LAW.com

Posted January 10th, 2019 in brexit, employment, immigration, news, pilot schemes by sally

‘The settlement scheme for EU nationals seeking to maintain their right to live and work in the UK once it leaves the EU will be extended to more individuals later this month, the government has announced.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 8th January 2019

Source: www.out-law.com

Women being forced to sign gagging clauses which stop them talking to their doctor, MPs hear – Daily Telegraph

Posted December 20th, 2018 in disclosure, employment, harassment, news, women by tracey

‘Women are being forced into signing into signing controversial gagging orders which are so strict they ban them from speaking to their doctor about their experiences, MPs have been told.’

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Daily Telegraph, 19th December 2018

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Sir Philip Green: Injunctions, Non-Disclosure Agreements and Parliamentary Privilege – Rights Info

‘In October, Sir Philip Green was revealed in Parliament as the businessman at the heart of ‘Britain’s #MeToo scandal’. The revelation sparked an intense debate about injunctions, non-disclosure agreements, parliamentary privilege and the relationship between Parliament and the courts. But what does all mean? In this explainer we get to the bottom of it.’

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Rights Info, 17th December 2018

Source: rightsinfo.org

Workers get new rights in overhaul but zero-hours contracts remain – The Guardian

‘The government has introduced what it claims to be the biggest package of workplace reforms for 20 years after concerns that ministers have failed to appeal to voters who are “just about managing”.’

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The Guardian, 17th December 2018

Source: www.theguardian.com

James Green: High Court makes finding of serious irregularity in Rule K Arbitration – Littleton Chambers

Posted December 12th, 2018 in arbitration, contracts, employment, interpretation, news, sport by sally

‘The High Court last week handed down its judgment in Fleetwood Wanderers Limited v AFC Fylde Limited [2018] EWHC 3318 (Comm), holding that a Rule K Arbitration Award was marred by serious irregularity. The successful Claimant was represented by Paul Gilroy QC.’

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Littleton Chambers, 5th December 2018

Source: www.littletonchambers.com

John Bowers QC on Employment Law: November Blog – Littleton Chambers

‘This month I look at a recent case on foster carers and working time, the ethos of religion defence in the Equality Act 2010 and the Supreme Court case of O’Connor v Bar Standards Board.’

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Littleton Chambers, 29th November 2018

Source: www.littletonchambers.com

“Do you get all of the service charge?” – Hardwicke Chambers

Posted December 12th, 2018 in employment, news, remuneration by sally

‘Look no further than this press release from BEIS on 1 October 2018 to gauge the government’s enthusiasm for highlighting that it has been thinking about policy and issues other than Brexit over the last couple of years:

“The government has announced plans to ensure that tips left for workers will go to them in full. While most employers act in good faith, in some sectors evidence points towards poor tipping practices, including excessive deductions being made from tips left by customers. New legislation, to be introduced at the earliest opportunity, will set out that tips must go to the workers providing the service.”’

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Hardwicke Chambers, 1st November 2018

Source: hardwicke.co.uk