Mediation: untangling knotty problems – Counsel

Posted February 21st, 2020 in barristers, civil justice, codes of practice, dispute resolution, news by sally

‘What’s the most voiced complaint about litigators, the Bar in particular, going into mediation? Some best practice points emerged from the recent Civil Mediation Council Conference – writes Rawdon Crozier.’

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Counsel, February 2020

Source: www.counselmagazine.co.uk

Mostyn J. and ‘amicable’ divorces – St Ives Chambers

‘amicable (spelt with a little ‘a’) charged the parties £300 for helping with preparation of their divorce petition and application for decree nisi, and a further £300 for drafting a simple precedent-compliant cleanbreak order (which the parties had negotiated) together with accompanying Form A, D81, joint disclosure statement. Their letter forwarding the same to the court attracted the attention of the court and this application.’

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St Ives Chambers, February 2020

Source: www.stiveschambers.co.uk

Court of Appeal adopts dominant purpose test – Henderson Chambers

‘Copying in your lawyer or having them at a meeting, does not necessarily mean that legal advice privilege will apply – in a law-changing judgment, the Court of Appeal has adopted the dominant purpose test in relation to Legal Advice Privilege.’

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Henderson Chambers, 30th January 2020

Source: www.hendersonchambers.co.uk

Appeal court confirms ‘dominant purpose’ test for legal advice privilege – OUT-LAW.com

‘The UK’s Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) could not claim legal advice privilege over email correspondence which was predominantly conducted for the purposes of seeking commercial views, rather than legal advice, the Court of Appeal has confirmed.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 4th February 2020

Source: www.pinsentmasons.com

Legal advice must be “dominant purpose” for privilege to apply – Legal Futures

‘Legal advice privilege (LAP) only applies where documents were created with the “dominant purpose” of seeking or providing legal advice, appeal judges have ruled.’

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Legal Futures, 29th January 2020

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

The case for judicial early neutral evaluation – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted January 27th, 2020 in case management, civil procedure rules, dispute resolution, news by sally

‘Perhaps an overlooked provision of the CPR is rule 3.1(2)(m) which provides that the court may ‘take any other step or make any other order for the purpose of managing the case and furthering the overriding objective, including hearing an early neutral evaluation with the aim of helping the parties settle the case’.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 27th January 2020

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Post Office settles mammoth group action – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted December 11th, 2019 in class actions, dispute resolution, news, postal service by tracey

‘TThe epic Bates v Post Office group litigation, which has dragged on for over three years, has been settled, the parties announced today with the Post Office admitting “we got things wrong in our dealings with a number of postmasters”. The surprise announcement was made days before judgment in the so-called the “Horizon trial” – the second trial in the class action – was due to be delivered.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 11th December 2019

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Resolving intractable disputes: best practice – New Law Journal

‘Enforcing contractual clauses to mediate, not litigate. Rob Langley, a mediator at North East Mediation Solutions, reports on how new rules are developing.’

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New Law Journal, 27th November 2019

Source: www.newlawjournal.co.uk

Dispute Resolution & Conflict Avoidance Training in times of increasing complexity – New Law Journal

Posted December 5th, 2019 in arbitration, dispute resolution, legal education, legal profession, news by sally

‘Disputes do arise. Between states, in businesses, within different sectors and in small knit groups, disagreements can happen, and they can have many unwelcome consequences.’

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New Law Journal, 28th November 2019

Source: www.newlawjournal.co.uk

Lomax v Lomax & the future of compulsory mediation – New Law Journal

Posted December 5th, 2019 in dispute resolution, news by sally

‘Bryan Clark provides a backdrop to the current law & practice around compulsory mediation.’

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New Law Journal, 28th November 2019

Source: www.newlawjournal.co.uk

Med-Arb: a successful combination for beneficiaries? – New Law Journal

Posted December 5th, 2019 in arbitration, dispute resolution, news by sally

‘Dr James Behrens considers the pros & cons of evaluative mediation in resolving trust & estate disputes.’

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New Law Journal, 28th November 2019

Source: www.newlawjournal.co.uk

There’s ADR…and Then There’s ADR: It’s Not All the Same – Hardwicke Chambers

Posted December 4th, 2019 in consent, dispute resolution, families, news by sally

‘In this case, an application under the Inheritance (Provision for Family & Dependants) Act 1975, the Defendant refused consent to an Early Neutral Evaluation (‘ENE’) hearing. By an order dated 20 May 2019, Parker J therefore declined to order one, on the basis that the court did not have power to do so in such circumstances where consent to an ENE hearing is withheld by one of the parties.’

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Hardwicke Chambers, 27th November 2019

Source: hardwicke.co.uk

Mediating Contested Wills Claims – Patrick Taylor – 4-5 Gray’s Inn Square

Posted November 26th, 2019 in dispute resolution, news, wills by sally

‘I am regularly appointed to mediate disputes about the validity of a will. Almost by definition they involve claims by family members against other family members.’

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4-5 Gray's Inn Square, 7th November 2019

Source: www.4-5.co.uk

Judicial Mediation in the Employment Tribunal: How to Make the Most of it – Littleton Chambers

Posted November 26th, 2019 in dispute resolution, employment, employment tribunals, judiciary, news by sally

‘Judicial mediation seems to be something of a Marmite topic among employment practitioners. Some see it as a cost-effective option for settling what might otherwise prove to be long-running and costly litigation. Others see it as a time-consuming and often unsuccessful exercise, conducted by individuals who are employed as judges (not mediators) for a reason.’

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Littleton Chambers, 25th November 2019

Source: www.littletonchambers.com

“All for one and one for all” when it comes to severing an adjudicator’s decision – Practical Law: Construction Blog

Posted November 20th, 2019 in construction industry, contracts, dispute resolution, enforcement, news, Scotland by sally

‘Round one was an adjudication enforcement application before Lord Doherty in the Scottish courts. The contractor (Dickie & Moore) had succeeded in an adjudication and, when the adjudicator’s decision went unpaid, issued court proceedings to get its money.’

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Practical Law: Construction Blog, 19th November 2019

Source: constructionblog.practicallaw.com

The Art of Mediation – The 36 Group

Posted November 20th, 2019 in artistic works, dispute resolution, news by sally

‘Disputes can arise in the commercial, private and family arenas and traditionally have resulted in formal court action for resolution. This can be very expensive, time consuming, emotionally challenging and often conducted in very public forums. The parties can be exposed to substantial costs, negative or harmful publicity, personal stress and a substantial call on their time. The courts have, in reality, relatively limited remedies, usually purely financial and this can restrict the range of outcomes that might more readily reflect the needs and aspirations of the parties involved.’

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The 36 Group, 12th November 2019

Source: 36group.co.uk

Speech by Sir Geoffrey Vos, The Chancellor of the High Court: the annual COMBAR lecture – Courts and Tribunals Judiciary

‘Speech by Sir Geoffrey Vos, The Chancellor of the High Court: the annual COMBAR lecture.’

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Courts and Tribunals Judiciary, 13th November 2019

Source: www.judiciary.uk

Adjudication of construction professional negligence claims – Hardwicke Chambers

Posted October 31st, 2019 in barristers, construction industry, dispute resolution, negligence, news by sally

‘Ebony Alleyne and Sarah McCann explore the pros and cons of using statutory adjudication as a means of resolving such disputes and then consider the role and potential impact of the new Professional Negligence Bar Association’s adjudication scheme.’

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Hardwicke Chambers, 29th October 2019

Source: hardwicke.co.uk

Court of Appeal orders early neutral evaluation despite party objection – Family Law

‘The Court of Appeal has held that the court has power to order an early neutral evaluation (ENE) by a judge even where one or more parties do not consent to that course. There was no reason to imply into the relevant rule giving the court power to order ENE any limitation based on the parties’ consent: Lomax v Lomax [2019] EWCA Civ 1467.’

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Family Law, 21st October 2019

Source: www.familylaw.co.uk

Considering crystallisation: what dispute should (or can) you refer to adjudication? – Practical Law: Construction Blog

Posted October 22nd, 2019 in construction industry, contracts, dispute resolution, jurisdiction, news by tracey

‘It’s a scenario we see all too often. Employer meets contractor. Employer and contractor enter into a contract and, for a while, everything seems rosy. Then, as the project progresses, unresolved claims start escalating and the relationship deteriorates. Inevitably, the parties’ minds turn to adjudication, and the potential recourse that they may find there.’

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Practical Law: Construction Blog, 21st October 2019

Source: constructionblog.practicallaw.com