Labour asks NHS and Matt Hancock to pause plans for sharing patient data – The Guardian

‘Labour has urged the NHS and Matt Hancock to pause their plan to share medical records from GPs to allow time for greater consultation on how the idea would work, saying that maintaining patients’ trust must be paramount.’

Full Story

The Guardian, 6th June 2021

Source: www.theguardian.com

Cauda Equina: Tells & Tales About the “Horse’s Tail” – Ropewalk Clinical Negligence Blog

Posted May 4th, 2021 in causation, doctors, hospitals, medical treatment, negligence, news by tracey

‘Cauda equina syndrome is a rare and severe type of spinal stenosis. A narrowing of the spinal canal causes the nerves in the lower back to become severely compressed. Typically, but not exclusively, it results from a prolapsed disc bulge. The condition requires urgent hospital admission and timely surgery (usually decompression of the disc). The longer it goes untreated, the greater the chance it will result in permanent paralysis and incontinence. On that account, it leads to claims for clinical negligence, notably in respect of delayed diagnosis, whether against hospital or GP. On that account too, such claims have latterly given rise to a number of decisions by the higher courts. The purpose of this blog is to review three of them.’

Full Story

Ropewalk Clinical Negligence Blog, 29th April 2021

Source: www.ropewalk.co.uk

Pippa Knight: Judge rules doctors can withdraw care – BBC News

Posted April 30th, 2021 in children, disabled persons, doctors, families, medical treatment, news by tracey

‘A High Court judge has given doctors permission to end the life of a brain-damaged six-year-old girl at the centre of a long-running treatment fight.’

Full Story

BBC News, 30th April 2021

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Clinical Negligence Cases: When the Bolam Test Does Not Apply – Ropewalk Clinical Negligence Blog

Posted April 21st, 2021 in chambers articles, doctors, medical treatment, negligence, news by tracey

‘The law requires medical practitioners to use diligence, care, knowledge, skill and caution in administering treatment to a patient. The question of whether a medical practitioner has met the requisite standard of care is often considered by reference to the test laid down in the case of Bolam v Friern Hospital Management Committee [1957] WLR 582. In Bolam, the Claimant sustained fractures of the acetabula during a course of electro-convulsive therapy administered to him at the Defendant’s mental hospital. In considering whether the Defendant was negligent in the manner in which it carried out the treatment, McNair J confirmed that: “the true test of establishing negligence in diagnosis or treatment on the part of a doctor was whether … he has acted in accordance with a practice accepted as proper by a responsible body of medical men skilled in that particular art” (p.587). As case law has developed, so have the principles underpinning the issue of breach of duty in medical negligence cases. This has led to a recognition that the Bolam test is not appropriate to apply in every case.’

Full Story

Ropewalk Clinical Negligence Blog, 20th April 2021

Source: www.ropewalk.co.uk

Iddon v Warner: a finding of fundamental dishonesty in a clinical negligence case – Parklane Plowden

Posted April 16th, 2021 in cancer, chambers articles, damages, deceit, doctors, negligence, news by sally

‘The Claimant brought a claim for damages against her General Practitioner for a missed diagnosis of breast cancer. As a result of the negligence, the Claimant had to undergo a mastectomy and axillary dissection, which would otherwise have been unnecessary. The Claimant argued that these treatments had left her with incapacitating chronic pain. The Defendant admitted breach of duty and causation, but contended that her claim should be dismissed because she had been fundamentally dishonest in relation to the claim.’

Full Story

Parklane Plowden, 1st April 2021

Source: www.parklaneplowden.co.uk

Towuaghantse v GMC [2021] EWHC 681 (Admin) Coroner’s findings, independence of experts and registrant denials: this case is not one to put on the “read later” pile – 2 Hare Court

‘It is difficult to know where to start with Towuaghantse v GMC [2021] EWHC 681 (Admin). I will give you a briefest account of the facts in a moment, but potentially Mostyn J’s judgment in this case stands as authority for the following principles:
a. The factual findings of a coroner, and any narrative conclusion, are all admissible against a registrant.
b. Authors of expert reports do not have to be independent in the sense of uninvolved with the institution or any of the players in a case, they are merely subject to a Porter v McGill style test of bias or apparent bias.
c. The capacity of a registrant to remediate sincerely should be judged by reference to evidence unconnected with their denials of the factual charges, unless the fact-finding decision included findings of blatant dishonesty by the registrant (a refinement of the same judge’s recent pronouncements in GMC v Awan [2020] EWHC 1553 (Admin)).’

Full Story

2 Hare Court, 30th March 2021

Source: www.2harecourt.com

London-wide launch of operation to convict those who assault NHS staff – Crown Prosecution Service

Posted April 1st, 2021 in assault, doctors, hate crime, news, nurses, paramedics, pilot schemes, prosecutions by tracey

‘Known as Operation Cavell, the initiative will see a senior officer review all reports of assaults and hate crime against NHS staff. Following a three-month pilot, the National Health Service (NHS), Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) and Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) have been working in partnership to launch the scheme today (Wednesday, 31 March) which aims to increase convictions and protect NHS staff on the frontline.’

Full Story

Crown Prosecution Service, 31st March 2021

Source: www.cps.gov.uk

Assisted dying inquiry essential, leading brain surgeon says – BBC News

Posted April 1st, 2021 in assisted suicide, doctors, inquiries, news by tracey

‘One of the UK’s leading brain surgeons, who has advanced prostate cancer, has said an inquiry into assisted dying is “absolutely essential”.’

Full Story

BBC News, 1st April 2021

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Pandemic NHS workers should be granted indefinite leave to remain — Aaron Gates-Lincoln – UK Human Rights Blog

‘Migrant workers have been essential to the operations of the NHS ever since its inception in 1948. Over the decades, many programmes have been used to encourage and find overseas workers and help them migrate to the UK to be employed in the healthcare system, demonstrating our governments acknowledgment of how important they are. As early as 1949, campaigns were made by the UK government in the Caribbean to recruit NHS staff, through advertisements in local newspapers.’

Full Story

UK Human Rights Blog, 17th March 2021

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Cardiff doctor sentenced for £68,000 fraud on NHS – BBC News

Posted March 10th, 2021 in doctors, fraud, news, sentencing, suspended sentences by sally

‘A doctor has been given a suspended sentence after he admitted defrauding the NHS out of nearly £68,000.’

Full Story

BBC News, 9th March 2021

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Surgeons fear wave of lawsuits over delays to cancer treatment – The Guardian

Posted March 8th, 2021 in cancer, compensation, coronavirus, delay, doctors, hospitals, medical treatment, news by tracey

‘The NHS is facing what doctors fear is “a legal storm” of claims for compensation from patients who could not get cancer treatment during the pandemic. Leading cancer surgeons are warning that patients who could not have surgery at the planned time, or a scan, or see their GP because of Covid-related disruption to services may sue if their cancer subsequently spread.’

Full Story

The Guardian, 7th March 2021

Source: www.theguardian.com

High court dismisses case on ‘failure to give guidance on prioritising patients’ – The Independent

‘A legal challenge to the government’s alleged failure to issue national guidance on how to prioritise patients during the Covid-19 pandemic has been dismissed by the High Court.’

Full Story

The Independent, 28th February 2021

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Limitation Practice in Clinical Negligence Cases After Azam – Ropewalk Chambers

Posted January 22nd, 2021 in appeals, chambers articles, delay, doctors, limitations, medical treatment, negligence, news by sally

‘Clinical negligence cases can be complex enough without the added difficulty of delay in bringing proceedings resulting in a limitation defence. When it is raised by Defendants it is currently common for cases to be managed so that limitation will be tried as a preliminary issue, perhaps because of the possibility of a major costs saving if a full trial can be avoided.’

Full Story

Ropewalk Chambers, 18th January 2021

Source: www.ropewalk.co.uk

Domestic abuse victims wrongly charged over £150 from GPs for letters confirming injuries – The Independent

Posted January 8th, 2021 in doctors, domestic violence, expert witnesses, fees, legal aid, news, victims by tracey

‘Domestic abuse victims are being wrongly charged over £150 by GPs for letters proving their injuries which are often required to access legal aid or other crucial services.’

Full Story

The Independent, 7th January 2021

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Virginity testing ban proposed by Richard Holden MP – BBC News

Posted December 16th, 2020 in bills, doctors, human rights, news, women by tracey

‘Proposals to outlaw virginity testing have passed their first parliamentary stage. North West Durham Conservative MP Richard Holden told parliament the practice was “medieval”. His Virginity Testing (Prohibition) Bill has been passed by MPs for further consideration by the Commons in January.’

Full Story

BBC News, 15th December 2020

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Covid-19: ‘Do not resuscitate’ decisions complaints up – BBC News

Posted December 4th, 2020 in bereavement, care homes, complaints, coronavirus, doctors, families, medical treatment, news by sally

‘Doctors may have made “do not resuscitate” decisions on a blanket basis in the first wave of the pandemic, the care watchdog has warned.’

Full Story

BBC News, 3rd December 2020

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Child abuse carried out under guise of medical treatment, report finds – The Guardian

‘Healthcare practitioners who committed child sexual abuse commonly did so under the guise of medical treatment, which went unchallenged by other staff even when unnecessary or inappropriate because of their position of trust, research has found.’

Full Story

The Guardian, 3rd December 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Puberty blockers: under-16s ‘unlikely to be able to give informed consent’ – The Guardian

‘Children under the age of 16 considering gender reassignment are unlikely to be mature enough to give informed consent to be prescribed puberty-blocking drugs, the high court has ruled.’

Full Story

The Guardian, 1st December 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Call to protect UK doctors from prosecution over life-or-death Covid rationing – The Guardian

‘Doctors forced to choose which patients to treat during the coronavirus pandemic and who would be left to die should be protected from prosecution, the prime minister has been told.’

Full Story

The Guardian, 17th November 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

A non-sexually motivated sexual assault?: GMC v Haris [2020] EWHC 2518 (Admin) – 2 Hare Court

‘Dr Haris faced allegations from two patients that he had conducted non-clinically indicated, intimate examinations without consent. He asserted forcefully that the alleged conduct simply never happened – and also called additional evidence to support his position that he was asexual.’

Full Story

2 Hare Court, 5th November 2020

Source: www.2harecourt.com