NRPF: The crisis facing the children of migrants – Family Law Week

Posted September 12th, 2019 in benefits, children, housing, human rights, immigration, local government, news by tracey

‘Cameron Boyle, political correspondent for the Immigration Advice Service, explains the impact on the children of migrants of having no recourse to public funds and encountering problems with local authorities’ application of Children Act 1989, section 17.’

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Family Law Week, 11th September 2019

Source: www.familylawweek.co.uk

Rastamouse creator sentenced for £8,000 benefit fraud – The Guardian

Posted September 11th, 2019 in benefits, community service, fraud, news, sentencing by tracey

‘The creator of the children’s TV character Rastamouse has been ordered to do community service for benefit fraud, after the judge’s daughter said the author should not be jailed.’

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The Guardian, 10th September 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

Capita to challenge payment ordered to family of woman who died after benefits were wrongly stopped – The Independent

‘A private company which was instrumental in stopping the benefits of a disabled woman who later died is going to court in a bid to avoid paying £10,000 awarded in damages to the family.’

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The Independent, 6th August 2019

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Man jailed for laundering more than £10m through Jewish charity – The Guardian

Posted July 9th, 2019 in benefits, charities, fraud, money laundering, news, sentencing by sally

‘A man has been jailed for almost 10 years for selling counterfeit erectile dysfunction and slimming pills and laundering more than £10m through bank accounts linked to a Jewish charity.’

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The Guardian, 5th July 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

Case Comment: R (DA & Ors) v Secretary of State for Work & Pensions [2019] UKSC 21 Part Two – UKSC Blog

Posted July 8th, 2019 in appeals, benefits, equality, families, human rights, news, Supreme Court by sally

‘In order to make good an art 14 claim, a claimant has to establish that (a) the Jones_Jcircumstances fall within the ambit of a substantive Convention right, (b) the claimant has a relevant status for the purposes of art 14, (c) they have been treated differently from others in a similar situation, by reason of their status; if so the burden is then on the state to demonstrate (d) whether the difference in treatment is objectively justified. In a Thlimmenos claim, the third question becomes “they have been treated the same as others in a relevantly different situation”. The way in which those issues were resolved by Lord Wilson for the majority is summarised above, but the court’s analysis of status and justification is worth some closer consideration.’

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UKSC Blog, 2nd July 2019

Source: ukscblog.com

Case Comment: R (DA & Ors) v Secretary of State for Work & Pensions [2019] UKSC 21 Part One – UKSC Blog

Posted July 8th, 2019 in appeals, benefits, equality, families, human rights, news, Supreme Court by sally

‘In these joined appeals, the Supreme Court considered whether the “revised benefit Jones_Jcap” – the effect of which is to restrict the maximum amount of benefits payable to couples and lone parents to £23000 in London and £20000 elsewhere – discriminated against the lone parents of young children, and against the children themselves. The Supreme Court decided by a majority of 5-2 that it did not, though there were various differences of opinion even amongst the majority.’

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UKSC Blog, 2nd July 2019

Source: ukscblog.com

Supreme Court to hear ‘bedroom tax’ dispute over ability to disapply regulations to avoid human rights breaches – Local Government Lawyer

Posted July 3rd, 2019 in benefits, housing, human rights, news, Supreme Court, tribunals by sally

‘The Supreme Court will this week (3 July) hear an appeal on whether social security tribunals have the power or duty to calculate entitlement to housing benefit without making deductions for under-occupancy, where the application of regulations would breach claimants’ rights under the Human Rights Act.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 2nd July 2019

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Supreme Court quashes decision to declare mother ‘intentionally homeless’ – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted June 21st, 2019 in benefits, homelessness, housing, local government, news, rent, Supreme Court by tracey

‘Samuels v Birmingham City Council [2019] UKSC 28. In unanimously allowing an appeal against a decision to declare the appellant intentionally homeless due to her inability to pay her rent, the Supreme Court affirmed that non-housing benefits are not designed to create a surplus that can be used to account for insufficient housing benefits.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 18th June 2019

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Universal credit adverts from government ‘deliberately misleading’, say charities – The Independent

‘A coalition of more than 80 benefit charities has submitted a complaint to the Advertising Standards Authority over government ads for Universal Credit which they claim are “deliberately misleading”.’

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The Independent, 19th June 2019

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Reasonable Expenses and intentional homelessness – Nearly Legal

‘Samuels v Birmingham City Council (2019) UKSC 28. The Supreme Court, finally, has delivered its judgment on the issue of the assessment of “reasonable expenses” when considering the affordability of rent in homelessness decisions.’

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Nearly Legal, 16th June 2019

Source: nearlylegal.co.uk

Lone parents lose benefits cap challenge at supreme court – The Guardian

‘The UK’s highest court has rejected a legal challenge to the benefit cap made by campaigners who argued that it discriminated against single parents with young children.’

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The Guardian, 15th May 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

New Judgment: R (DA & Ors) v Secretary of State for Work and Pensions; R (DS & Ors) v Secretary of State for Work and Pensions [2019] UKSC 21 – UKSC Blog

Posted May 15th, 2019 in appeals, benefits, children, equality, families, news, proportionality, Supreme Court by sally

‘This appeal considered whether the application of the revised benefit cap, introduced by the Welfare Reform and Work Act 2016, s 8, to lone parents with children under two years old (i) unlawfully discriminates against parents and/or the children, contrary to ECHR, art 14 with art 8, and/or art 2 of the First Protocol and in breach of the UK’s international obligations under the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, art 3, and/or (ii) is irrelevant.’

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UKSC Blog, 15th May 2019

Source: ukscblog.com

The socio-economic duty: A powerful idea hidden in plain sight in the Equality Act – Oxford Human Rights Hub

‘Section 1 of the Equality Act 2010 asks public authorities to actively consider the way in which their policies and their most strategic decisions can increase or decrease inequalities. I am talking about the socio-economic duty. However, successive governments since 2010 have failed to commence it, to bring it to life in technical terms, which means that public authorities are not technically bound by Section 1.’

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Oxford Human Rights Hub, 15th May 2019

Source: ohrh.law.ox.ac.uk

Woman, 81, killed herself after pension was frozen in error – The Guardian

Posted May 10th, 2019 in benefits, elderly, inquests, news, pensions, suicide by sally

‘An 81-year-old woman killed herself after running out of money when her pension was frozen due to an administrative error.’

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The Guardian, 9th May 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

High court suspends Home Office policy limiting support for slavery victims – The Guardian

‘A high court judge has suspended a Home Office policy that cuts off after six weeks all statutory support to slavery victims in the UK, ruling that it risks causing “irreparable harm to very vulnerable individuals”.’

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The Guardian, 17th April 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

I’m still at a loss’: Windrush victims who were forced into homelessness and debt due to scandal still living in anguish and destitution a year on – The Independent

‘On 16 April 2018, Amber Rudd – then home secretary – stood up in the House of Commons to formally acknowledge the Windrush scandal for the first time. The treatment of immigrants by her department’s “hostile environment” was appalling, she said, vowing to deal with cases within two weeks and put things right. But exactly one year later, the suffering goes on. Many are yet to receive a response to their application to the taskforce, leaving them in a “state of limbo” with little or no information about how their case is progressing.’

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The Independent, 16th April 2019

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Two-thirds of councils say they can’t afford to comply with homelessness law – The Guardian

Posted April 10th, 2019 in benefits, budgets, homelessness, housing, local government, news, statistics by sally

‘The Homelessness Reduction Act, in operation for the past 12 months, is potentially the greatest piece of homelessness legislation for 40 years in England, according to Southwark council in south London. The Labour-run council pioneered the government’s new flagship act, and is upbeat about it. While homelessness went up in the borough last year, as it did across London, the rise was less steep than expected: 8.6% for families placed in temporary accommodation and a similarly small increase for rough sleepers. At the same time, there was also a 50% increase in the number of people the council helped to stay in their home. “It shows the act works,” says the council’s cabinet member for housing, Stephanie Cryan.’

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The Guardian, 10th April 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

Ending duties after the HRA – Nearly Legal

‘This is a settled judicial review, I’ve seen the grounds, interim order and final consent order. It raises a number of issues about the performance of the new Housing Act 1996 Part VII duties as amended by the Homelessness Reduction Act 2017.’

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Nearly Legal, 7th April 2019

Source: nearlylegal.co.uk

The Inheritance Act and Adult Child Claimants – recent guidance from the Chancery Division – Family Law Week

‘Gwyn Evans, barrister of Tanfield Chambers, explains the court’s judgment in a recent Inheritance Act case involving an estranged adult claimant, reliant on state benefits, and defendants for whom inheritance was a windfall.’

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Family Law Week, 29th March 2019

Source: www.familylawweek.co.uk

DWP defeats public sector equality duty challenge over method of communication with homeless man – Local Government Lawyer

‘The Department for Work & Pensions has successfully defended a High Court challenge brought by a homeless man who claimed that its approach to communication was in breach of its duties under the public sector equality duty.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 11th March 2019

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk