Facial Recognition Technology: High Court gives judgment – UK Human Rights Blog

‘R (Bridges) v Chief Constable of South Wales Police and Secretary of State for the Home Department [2019] EWHC 2341 (Admin). The High Court has dismissed an application for judicial review regarding the use of Automated Facial Recognition Technology (AFR) and its implications for privacy rights and data protection.’

Full Story

UK Human Rights Blog, 12th September 2019

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

The implications of ‘bulk hacking’ – Henderson Chambers

‘Corporate Crime analysis: Matthew Richardson, barrister at Henderson Chambers, examines the concept of ‘bulk hacking’ by intelligence services and some of the legal implications, in light of the latest judicial review challenge by Liberty.’

Full Story

Henderson Chambers, 9th August 2019

Source: www.hendersonchambers.co.uk

Lip-reading CCTV will have people ‘cupping hands over their mouths’ in street, warns surveillance watchdog – Daily Telegraph

‘People will be left “cupping their hands over their mouths” in the street if new lip-reading CCTV is not reined in, the Government’s surveillance watchdog has warned. Tony Porter, the Surveillance Camera Commissioner, said in future people would have to guard their conversations from prying cameras in the same manner as football managers on live TV, unless ministers act to regulate emerging intrusive technologies.’

Full Story

Daily Telegraph, 27th August 2019

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Monitoring of mobile phones – rights groups challenge police – The Guardian

‘The refusal by police forces to disclose whether they are exploiting covert surveillance technology to track mobile phones is to be challenged at a tribunal next week.’

Full Story

The Guardian, 20th August 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

Courts to get anti-knife crime powers with Asbo-style orders for children as young as 12 – The Independent

‘Courts will be given extra powers to impose rules and curfews on anyone aged 12 or over who may be carrying a knife, the Home Office has announced. The Asbo-style powers, called knife crime prevention orders (KCPOs), are civil orders that can be imposed on people who the courts believe pose a threat to the public through the use of a bladed weapon. The powers will be introduced as part of the Offensive Weapons Act, which is attempting to tackle knife crime and serious violence.’

Full Story

The Independent, 18th August 2019

Source: www.independent.co.uk

NCA freezes £100m suspected to be from corruption overseas – The Guardian

‘More than £100m suspected to have been imported to the UK from bribery and corruption overseas has been frozen following a court order obtained by the National Crime Agency.’

Full Story

The Guardian, 14th August 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

Metropolitan Police ‘making excuses’ over report into Carl Beech investigation – Daily Telegraph

‘Scotland yard has claimed it cannot publish the unredacted report into its handling of Operation Midland because to do so could reveal covert policing methods and help criminals.’

Full Story

Daily Telegraph, 31st July 2019

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Liberty loses high court challenge to snooper’s charter – The Guardian

‘The human rights group Liberty has lost its latest high court challenge against the government’s mass surveillance powers.’

Full Story

The Guardian, 29th July 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

Police may have broken law during Carl Beech investigation – ex-judge – The Guardian

‘A retired high court judge, whose review found a catalogue of failings in Scotland Yard’s £2.5m inquiry into false claims about a VIP paedophile ring made by a former nurse, says the police may have broken the law during their investigation.’

Full Story

The Guardian, 30th July 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

Child covert intelligence lawful, says the High Court – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted July 23rd, 2019 in children, human rights, investigatory powers, news, privacy, young persons by sally

‘In rejecting the claim of Just for Kids Law, Mr Justice Supperstone affirmed that the legal framework for deploying juvenile covert human intelligence sources (JCHIS) was lawful and adequately safeguarded the child’s welfare.’

Full Story

UK Human Rights Blog, 22nd July 2019

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Stop and search is discriminatory, so why is it on the rise? – The Guardian

‘The first stop and search Jamal ever experienced was when he was 11 years old. Now, at 24, he has been stopped numerous times. Most recently, a stop became aggressive and he was hit in the face with handcuffs, but was charged and convicted with assaulting an officer. There is little evidence stop and search works in combating violent crime, but critics say it disproportionately targets young black men.’

Full Story

The Guardian, 12th July 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

CPS cancels meeting on rape victims’ phone data due to legal action – The Guardian

‘Police chiefs and prosecutors have been accused of treating a coalition of women’s groups with contempt after cancelling a meeting to discuss concerns over requests to hand over mobile phone records in rape investigations.’

Full Story

The Guardian, 6th July 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

Police face calls to end use of facial recognition software – The Guardian

‘Police are facing calls to halt the use of facial recognition software to search for suspected criminals in public after independent analysis found matches were only correct in a fifth of cases and the system was likely to break human rights laws.’

Full Story

The Guardian, 3rd July 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

Watchdog criticises ‘chaotic’ police use of facial recognition – The Guardian

‘Police forces are pushing ahead with the use of facial recognition systems in the absence of clear laws on whether, when or how the technology should be employed, a watchdog has said.’

Full Story

The Guardian, 27th June 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

Mike Gordon: Privacy International, Parliamentary Sovereignty and the Synthetic Constitution – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘The case of R (Privacy International) v Investigatory Powers Tribunal is the latest in a series of high profile judicial engagements with the doctrine of parliamentary sovereignty. The case concerned the legal status of s.68(7) of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000, and in particular, whether this provision constituted a successful attempt to oust the jurisdiction of the High Court to hear challenges to the decisions of the Investigatory Powers Tribunal by judicial review.’

Full Story

UK Constitutional Law Association, 26th June 2019

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

MI5 engaged in ‘extraordinary and persistent illegality’ whilst handling personal data, High Court hears – Daily Telegraph

‘MI5 has been unlawfully holding people’s data collected through surveillance or hacking programmes, the high court has been told.’

Full Story

Daily Telegraph, 11th June 2019

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Facial recognition tech: watchdog calls for code to regulate police use – The Guardian

‘The information commissioner has expressed concern over the lack of a formal legal framework for the use of facial recognition cameras by the police. A barrister for the commissioner, Elizabeth Denham, told a court the current guidelines around automated facial recognition (AFR) technology were “ad hoc” and a clear code was needed.’

Full Story

The Guardian, 23rd May 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

Home Secretary speech on keeping our country safe – Home Office

Posted May 23rd, 2019 in intelligence services, investigatory powers, police, speeches, terrorism by tracey

‘Home Secretary Sajid Javid spoke on security, the threat from terrorism and the importance of international collaboration.’

Full speech

Home Office, 20th May 2019

Source: www.gov.uk/home-office

Secret ‘Torture Loophole’ Raises Serious Questions For Government, MP David Davis And Barrister Say – Rights Info

‘The government must be asked “serious questions” on how a secret policy allowing ministers to approve actions that could lead to torture was signed off, a leading QC and Tory MP have said.’

Full Story

Rights Info, 20th May 2019

Source: rightsinfo.org

Police facial recognition surveillance court case starts – BBC News

‘The first major legal challenge to police use of automated facial recognition surveillance begins in Cardiff later.’

Full Story

BBC News, 21st May 2019

Source: www.bbc.co.uk