The cart before the horse when requesting an adjudicator: Land End Developments Construction Limited v Kingstone Civil Engineering Limited [2020] EWHC 2338 – Hardwicke Chambers

‘These proceedings related to an adjudicator’s decision dated 27th April 2020 (“the 27th April Decision”) under the Scheme for Construction Contracts (England and Wales) Regulations 1998 as amended (“the Scheme”). Lane End Developments Construction Limited (“Lane End”) was the main contractor on a housing development (“the Development”) and Kingstone Civil Engineering Limited (“Kingstone”) was sub-contracted to carry out enabling works for the Development. On 2nd March 2020, Kingstone issued Interim Payment Application No. 17 in the sum of £356,439.19, but Lane End did not serve a Pay Less Notice nor, until 26th March, did it serve a Payment Notice.’

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Hardwicke Chambers, 13th November 2020

Source: hardwicke.co.uk

The Nature of Demurrage: K Line Pte Ltd v Priminds Shipping (Hk) Co. Ltd. m.v. “Eternal Bliss” [2020] EWHC 2373 (Comm) – 33 Bedford Row

Posted November 25th, 2020 in appeals, arbitration, chambers articles, charterparties, compensation, damages, news by sally

‘An important point regarding the nature of demurrage may, finally, have been conclusively determined by the High Court in this recent case, which came before Mr Justice Andrew Baker. It is however presently the subject of an appeal to the Court of Appeal (leave having been granted by the learned judge), so a definitive answer is awaited.’

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33 Bedford Row, 12th November 2020

Source: www.33bedfordrow.co.uk

The Cautionary tale of the postman, the application for relief and not enough money? Diriye v Bojaj [2020] EWCA Civ 1400 – Park Square Barristers

‘This credit hire appeal case was heard in the Court Of Appeal on 15 October 2020 with judgment being handed down on 4 November. It was heard by Lord Justice Coulson who gave the leading judgment, Lady Justice Davies and Lady Justice Rose agreeing.’

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Park Square Barristers, 13th November 2020

Source: www.parksquarebarristers.co.uk

Diriye v Bojaj [2020] EWCA Civ 1400: ‘Signed For’ deliveries and deemed service – Littleton Chambers

‘In Diriye v Bojaj [2020] EWCA Civ 1400, the Court of Appeal handed down an important judgment clarifying the scope of the deemed service provisions in CPR 6.26 in the context of signed for deliveries. The Court held that a “Signed For 1st Class” delivery would still be deemed served “on the second day after it was posted” in accordance with CPR 6.26, regardless of the date on which it was actually signed for and received.’

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Littleton Chambers, 11th November 2020

Source: littletonchambers.com

Racism and Football – What are the possible solutions? – Church Court Chambers

Posted November 25th, 2020 in chambers articles, diversity, employment, equality, news, race discrimination, racism, sport by sally

‘This two-part series of articles written by Yasin Patel (barrister and director of SLAM) looks at the question of “racism in football”. The first article outlined the arguments as to why discrimination and racism is “alive and kicking” in the game and the many forms in which it is prevalent throughout the whole structure of the game.’

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Church Court Chambers, November 2020

Source: churchcourtchambers.co.uk

Supreme Court reduces standard of proof for suicide and unlawful killing in inquest conclusions – Park Square Barristers

‘The Supreme Court has on 13 November 2020 handed down the judgment in this case concerning the appropriate standard of proof for conclusions at inquests.’

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Park Square Barristers, 13th November 2020

Source: www.parksquarebarristers.co.uk

A Costly Lesson? A discussion of the decision in Belsner v Cam Legal Services Limited [2020] EWHC 2755 (QB) – Parklane Plowden Chambers

‘Lavender J has held that solicitors cannot rely upon CPR 46.9(2) to recover more from a client than could have been recovered between parties in the proceedings, unless they can show that the client provided informed consent. The decision potentially has far-reaching consequences for the use of conditional fee agreements (“CFAs”).’

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Parklane Plowden Chambers, 20th November 2020

Source: www.parklaneplowden.co.uk

Land-use Conflict – Supreme Court Rules on the Discharge of Restrictive Covenants: Alexander Devine Children’s Cancer Trust v Housing Solutions Ltd [2020] UKSC 45 – 39 Essex Chambers

‘The appeal in Alexander Devine Children’s Cancer Trust v Housing Solutions Ltd [2020] UKSC 45 was the first time that either the Supreme Court or the House of Lords had considered the Upper Tribunal’s power to discharge or modify restrictive covenants affecting land under section 84 of the Law of Property Act 1925. The case confirms important principles affecting the interplay between private law property rights, planning and land use. Lord Burrows, giving the only substantive judgment of the Supreme Court, agreed with the Court of Appeal that the Upper Tribunal’s decision was wrong, but disagreed in a number of important respects with the speech of Sales LJ (as he then was) in the Court of Appeal ([2018] EWCA Civ 2679). For a number of reasons, it is likely that we shall be reading and re-reading this Supreme Court decision for many years to come.’

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39 Essex Chambers, 9th November 2020

Source: www.39essex.com

Will guardian schemes survive the Court of Appeal’s decision in Ludgate House? – Hardwicke Chambers

Posted November 18th, 2020 in appeals, chambers articles, guardianship, local government, news, rates by sally

‘Richard Clayton QC of Kings Chambers and Exchequer Chambers, and Faisel Sadiq discuss the upcoming appeal in Ludgate House Ltd v Ricketts (VO), in which they are instructed to represent the appellant (London Borough of Southwark), and how it is likely to play a significant role in the future of property guardian schemes.’

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Hardwicke Chambers, 4th November 2020

Source: hardwicke.co.uk

Is “Compensation” Back to the Fore in Financial Remedy Proceedings – Becket Chambers

‘The brief facts of the matter are that the parties cohabited and were married for a total of 11 years. They had two children, aged 8 and 10. When they met both the Husband (H) and the Wife (W) were working as solicitors with H an associate and W a trainee although W became an associate on qualifying in 2001. They started a relationship in 2002/3 and in that year, H became an equity partner. By 2019 he earned net of tax just short of £1m per annum. In 2006 W became a managing associate, and in 2007 cohabitation started. Later that year W left the firm to be an in-house lawyer at a bank (on the promise she could work part time if she had children). In 2010 she was made a director, although after her maternity leave she found she was not permitted to work part time in the legal department, and took a part time role in the business team. In 2016 she was made redundant, and she did not work after that.’

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Becket Chambers, 2nd November 2020

Source: becket-chambers.co.uk

A non-sexually motivated sexual assault?: GMC v Haris [2020] EWHC 2518 (Admin) – 2 Hare Court

‘Dr Haris faced allegations from two patients that he had conducted non-clinically indicated, intimate examinations without consent. He asserted forcefully that the alleged conduct simply never happened – and also called additional evidence to support his position that he was asexual.’

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2 Hare Court, 5th November 2020

Source: www.2harecourt.com

Positive action and proportionality: Supreme Court guidance in Agudas Israel Housing Association – Cloisters

‘In R (on the application of Z and another) (AP) (Appellants) v Hackney London Borough Council and another (Respondents) UKSC 2019/0162, the Supreme Court held that it was lawful for a housing association to provide social housing only to Orthodox Jews, in its first ever ruling on positive action. In this blog, Charlotte Goodman, an equality law barrister at Cloisters, considers the importance of the judgment.’

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Cloisters, 6th November 2020

Source: www.cloisters.com

Vigilante justice: is evidence obtained by ‘paedophile hunter’ groups admissible in criminal proceedings? – 2 Hare Court

‘On 15 July 2020 the Supreme Court handed down its findings in Sutherland (Appellant) v Her Majesty’s Advocate (Respondent) (Scotland) [2020] UKSC 32.’

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2 Hare Court, 2nd November 2020

Source: www.2harecourt.com

Does the failure to place a redundant employee on an existing “bank” workers list render a dismissal unfair? – 3PB

‘It was common ground between the parties that the claimant had been dismissed for a fair reason, namely redundancy. The point of contention arose from the fact that, at point of dismissal, the respondent had in place a list of workers upon whom it would call upon to
undertake adhoc work as and when needed.’

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3PB, 2nd October 2020

Source: www.3pb.co.uk

Consumer Credit: Covid (Continued) and Concealed Changes – Henderson Chambers

Posted November 11th, 2020 in chambers articles, consumer credit, coronavirus, news by sally

‘The Financial Conduct Authority has again extended its Guidance on consumer debt and there are two largely unpublicised technical changes in the pipeline to beware of.’

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Henderson Chambers, 15th October 2020

Source: www.hendersonchambers.co.uk

Section 21A Applications and Section 48 Orders (DP v A Local Authority) – 39 Essex Chambers

‘In this case, Mr Justice Hayden provides helpful practical guidance on the operation of section 48 of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA 2005), as well as confirming the scope of, and the court’s role in, proceedings brought pursuant to MCA 2005, s 21A. He further emphasises the importance of section 21A application being determined speedily, in accordance with Article 5(4) of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) (and accordingly suggests how practically weaknesses in capacity evidence could be addressed).’

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39 Essex Chambers, 15th October 2020

Source: www.39essex.com

Justice delayed might be justice denied… but for which side? A look at Nigeria v Process & Industrial Developments – Hardwicke Chambers

Posted November 11th, 2020 in arbitration, chambers articles, civil justice, delay, energy, fraud, news, time limits by sally

‘Last month, Sir Ross Cranston handed down judgment in The Federal Republic of Nigeria v Process & Industrial Developments [2020] EWHC 2379 (Comm), marking the latest stage in what has proved a notoriously long-running dispute since arbitration between the parties was first commenced in 2012.’

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Hardwicke Chambers, 14th October 2020

Source: hardwicke.co.uk

The Illegality Defence in the Supreme Court again – Littleton Chambers

‘The common law defence of illegality was considered by the Supreme Court in Patel v Mirza [2016] UKSC 42. The Court rejected the reliance principle as applied in Tinsley v Milligan [1994] 1 AC 340, according to which relief was refused to parties who had to rely on their own illegality to establish their case. In its place, the majority adopted a more flexible approach which openly addressed the underlying policy considerations involved and invited Courts to reach a balanced judgment in each case, permitting account to be taken of the proportionality of the outcome.’

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Littleton Chambers, 4th November 2020

Source: littletonchambers.com

Disability, Delusions and Definitions – Parklane Plowden

‘Employees that suffer from a disability so defined are protected against various forms of discrimination because of that status. Employers facing claims of such discrimination must assess whether a Tribunal will find that the employee was in fact, during the relevant period, disabled and, if so, whether it knew or reasonably ought to have known of that fact. It is common for employers to concede the fact of disability.’

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Parklane Plowden Chambers, 4th November 2020

Source: www.parklaneplowden.co.uk

Police officers and the use of force – are we really all missing the point?: R (Officer W80) v Director General of the Independent Officer for Police Conduct [2020] EWCA Civ 1301 – 2 Hare Court

‘The Court of Appeal has recently delivered an interesting and potentially very significant judgment in the case of Officer W80. The case concerned the use of force by a police officer and whether misconduct proceedings could subsequently be instituted against him on the basis of his honestly held but mistaken belief.’

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2 Hare Court, 5th November 2020

Source: www.2harecourt.com