The Supreme Court’s decision in Unwired Planet – what comes next? – Competition Bulletin from Blackstone Chambers

‘The UK Supreme Court has handed down its long-awaited judgment in Unwired Planet. Its decision has profound implications for patent owners and implementers alike and is likely to lead to heavily contested jurisdictional disputes going forward.’

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Competition Bulletin from Blackstone Chambers, 15th September

Source: competitionbulletin.com

Do black lives matter in the employment justice system? – Garden Court Chambers

‘Paper produced by Mukhtiar Singh of the Garden Court Employment and Discrimination Law Team.’

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Garden Court Chambers, 14th September 2020

Source: www.gardencourtchambers.co.uk

Lyum Roy Campbell (a protected party by his father & litigation friend Donald Campbell) v Advantage Insurance Company Ltd [2020] EWHC 2210 (QB) – Parklane Plowden Chambers

‘In this case the court considered the issues of capacity, consent and contributory negligence following a road traffic accident wherein the Claimant, Lyum Roy Campbell, suffered very severe injuries, having allowed himself to be driven by a friend who was intoxicated.’

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Parklane Plowden Chambers, 21st August 2020

Source: www.parklaneplowden.co.uk

Sentencing and confiscation in prosecutions for breaches of planning enforcement notices (R v Roth): Sarah Wood for Lexis Nexis – 5SAH

‘This case involved an appeal against a fine and a confiscation order following criminal proceedings for breach of an enforcement notice served under the Town and Country Planning Act 1990 (TCPA 1990). The appellant, Mr Roth, had converted a property into 12 self-contained flats without prior planning permission. His appeal against sentence was successful; insufficient credit had been given for his guilty plea in the Crown Court, where the case had been committed for the purposes of confiscation. The appeal against the confiscation order was advanced on three grounds: firstly, that the wording of the summons restricted the criminality to one day; secondly, that the rent received was not linked to the breach of the planning legislation; and thirdly, that it was disproportionate for the benefit figure to comprise the gross rental received. All three grounds were dismissed.’

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5SAH, 24th August 2020

Source: www.5sah.co.uk

Rapper Ceon Broughton wins appeal against manslaughter conviction following festival death of Louella Fletcher-Michie – Garden Court Chambers

‘Ceon Broughton, a rapper jailed over the death of his partner Louella Fletcher-Michie from a drug overdose at Bestival has won his appeal against his manslaughter conviction. Broughton’s conviction in 2019 and seven-year prison sentence for manslaughter was quashed on 18 August 2020 by the Court of Appeal. The appeal was heard before The Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales Lord Burnett, Mr Justice Sweeney and Mr Justice Murray.’

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Garden Court Chambers, 18th August 2020

Source: www.gardencourtchambers.co.uk

GCSE results: Key Q&As for Students and Schools – 3PB

Posted August 28th, 2020 in chambers articles, coronavirus, education, examinations, news, school children by sally

‘This year is a year like no other. Students have found out how they performed in exams they did not even sit. The Department for Education (“DfE”) changed its approach in a major U-turn five days after the A Level results were released.’

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3PB, 20th August 2020

Source: www.3pb.co.uk

‘Lawful object’ – Section 4(1) of the Explosive Substances Act 1883 – KCH Garden Sq

‘On the 11 March 2020 the Supreme Court gave their judgment in the case of R v Copeland [2020] UKSC 8. This case concerned the interpretation of the Explosive Substances Act 1883 (‘the Act’), section 4(1). This provides that anyone who makes or has in their possession explosive substances is liable to prosecution unless they can show it was ‘for a lawful object’. Specifically, the Court considered the meaning of what constituted ‘a lawful object’ and the case is likely to be of some interest to those involved in counter-terrorism matters.’

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KCH Garden Sq, August 2020

Source: kchgardensquare.co.uk

Ban on evictions and notice periods extended in Government u-turn – St Ives Chambers

‘The stay imposed on possession proceedings was due to expire on Sunday 23 August 2020. However, in an 11th hour u-turn, Robert Jenrick announced on Friday afternoon that the ban on evictions would be extended for a further 4 weeks (taking the total ban to 6 months) in England and Wales. In a further, unforeseen twist, it was announced that a new 6 month notice period would be in place until at least 31 March 2021 (this applies to England only) in all matters save for “serious cases”, examples of which are anti-social behaviour and domestic abuse.’

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St Ives Chambers, 21st August 2020

Source: www.stiveschambers.co.uk

An Introduction to Ogden 8 – Ropewalk Chambers

Posted August 28th, 2020 in accidents, chambers articles, compensation, damages, news, personal injuries by sally

‘On 17th July 2020, the Ogden Working Party published the 8th Edition of the Ogden Tables, the first new edition
in almost a decade and the first under a new Chairman, William Latimer-Sayer QC.’

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Ropewalk Chambers, 18th August 2020

Source: www.ropewalk.co.uk

A Conflict at the Heart of the Planning White Paper (And Some Skateboarding References)- Guildhall Chambers

‘Whilst much could be (and most of it has already been) written about the Government’s recent white paper on planning, two things struck me in particular.

First, how generous of Whitehall to offer such fertile ground to article-writing lawyers and other commentators searching for occupation during Covid-enforced idleness. There is only so much nourishment available via Zoom, and anyway, in terms of professional development, thanks to my planning bar colleagues and their prodigious supply of webinars (manifestly exceeding the need, whether assessed on a 5 year supply, standardised, or any other basis of your choice) all of us now know literally everything about the current policy and legislative regime that there is to know. Or at least, most of us do. Others have employed the unexpected gift of time more imaginatively: my two young sons and I, for example, are on the verge of perfecting the Frontside 180, which I reckon isn’t at all bad for three pre-lockdown non-skateboarders.’

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Guildhall Chambers, 25th August 2020

Source: www.guildhallchambers.co.uk

Reopening Workplaces: Considerations for Commercial Landlord and Tenants – Thomas More Chambers

Posted August 27th, 2020 in chambers articles, coronavirus, health & safety, landlord & tenant, news by sally

‘With more businesses reopening their previously closed premises and following the Prime Minister’s recent encouragement for employees to return to work, it is important that commercial landlords and tenants consider their statutory health and safety obligations and enact all appropriate measures.’

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Thomas More Chambers, 5th August 2020

Source: www.thomasmore.co.uk

PI Fraud: when silence can be FD – Park Square Barristers

‘On appeal, a High Court judge reversed the finding that a claimant was not fundamentally dishonest due to inconsistencies in the longevity of his injuries and the non-disclosure of a subsequent road traffic accident to a medical expert (“the deafening silences”). On this basis, the claimant was found to be fundamentally dishonest pursuant to s.57 Criminal Justice and Courts Act 2015 and was consequently ordered to pay 70% of the defendant insurer’s costs. Matthew Smith, co-founder of the PSQB fraud team, was instructed on behalf of the successful appellant insurer.’

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Park Square Barristers, 3rd August 2020

Source: www.parksquarebarristers.co.uk

The position on possession – Hardwicke Chambers

‘Andrew Skelly considers the current restrictions on a landlord’s ability to recover possession, and the emergency measures set out in the Coronavirus Act 2020 that will continue to apply after the automatic stay on possession proceedings comes to an end on 23 August 2020.’

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Hardwicke Chambers, 12th August 2020

Source: hardwicke.co.uk

Fairness in “conducive to the public good” exclusion decisions – Garden Court Chambers

Posted August 19th, 2020 in chambers articles, criminal justice, deportation, immigration, news by sally

‘Exclusion decisions prohibit entry to the UK and are made under a non-statutory power exercised personally by the Home Secretary. They tend to be used against foreign national (non-EU) prisoners who have taken up the offer of assistance to leave the UK under the facilitated returns scheme. They are made on the basis that preventing the person’s return here is conducive to the public good.’

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Garden Court Chambers, 5th August 2020

Source: www.gardencourtchambers.co.uk

Capacity and Serious Medical Treatment – Pump Court Chambers

‘This case concerned a young woman, K, who was assessed to lack capacity. K was diagnosed with cancer. The proposed treatment was “complex”, “intrusive” and was described as a “life-altering complexion”.’

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Pump Court Chambers, 6th August 2020

Source: www.pumpcourtchambers.com

Court avers the right to legal proceedings but you may still have to pay up front on existing judgments – Hardwicke Chambers

‘This case acts as a reminder of the hierarchy to seeking a remedy in construction contracts. The right to legal proceedings in construction contracts is more fundamental than the payment provisions. The payment provisions are superior to the adjudication provisions. However, a party will still have to honour judgment debts in related proceedings.’

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Hardwicke Chambers, 5th August 2020

Source: hardwicke.co.uk

Successful TOEIC appellants to be granted 2.5 years Leave to Remain – Garden Court Chambers

‘The Home Office has agreed that any TOEIC appellants who succeed in their appeals on Article 8 grounds, should be granted 2.5 years leave to remain.’

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Garden Court Chambers, 4th August 2020

Source: www.gardencourtchambers.co.uk

Re Debenhams Retail: do the wages of furloughed employees enjoy super priority in an insolvency? – Hardwicke Chambers

‘The Appellants were the Joint Administrators of Debenhams Retail Ltd (“the Company”), which had entered into administration on 9 April 2020. This had followed decisions in late March to place some 14,000 of its employees on furlough under the Government’s Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (“the Scheme”).’

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Hardwicke Chambers, 11th August 2020

Source: hardwicke.co.uk

Revisiting Force Majeure – St Ives Chambers

Posted August 14th, 2020 in chambers articles, contracts, coronavirus, news by sally

‘Firstly, it should be made clear that force majeure is a clause which allows a party or parties to an agreement to avoid performing it in some way. However, that is dependent on certain events as specified within the agreement occurring.’

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St Ives Chambers, 3rd August 2020

Source: www.stiveschambers.co.uk

Court of Appeal hands down ruling on changing nationality of children in care – Local Government Lawyer

‘A local authority cannot seek to change the nationality of children in care without the matter being considered by the High Court, the Court of Appeal has ruled.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 13th August 2020

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk