Falklands veteran ‘forced out over sexuality’ plans to sue MoD – BBC News

‘A Falklands veteran forced out of the Royal Navy over his sexuality plans to sue for the return of military honours.’

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BBC News, 8th May 2019

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

This week’s round up – Williamson fired over Huawei and the courts return after Easter – UK Human Rights Blog

‘Despite the return of the courts on Monday, it was another relatively light week in terms of decisions in the fields of public law and human rights. However, the High Court decided a number of interesting clinical negligence cases, whilst the Court of Appeal gave judgement in the case of TM (Kenya), R (On the Application Of) v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2019] EWCA Civ 784.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 7th May 2019

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Age of criminal responsibility in England and Wales ‘too low’ says watchdog – The Independent

‘The low age of criminal responsibility in England and Wales is putting children at risk during crucial years of their development, the human rights watchdog has warned. In an unprecedented move, the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) has called on lawmakers to raise the age at which a child can be deemed responsible for committing a crime – currently at 10.’

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The Independent, 6th May 2019

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Facial recognition wrongly identifies public as potential criminals 96% of time, figures reveal – The Independent

‘Facial recognition technology has misidentified members of the public as potential criminals in 96 per cent of scans so far in London, new figures reveal.’

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The Independent, 7th May 2019

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Caster Semenya testosterone verdict ignites debate about fairness, women’s sport and human rights – Daily Telegraph

Posted May 2nd, 2019 in equality, gender, human rights, medicines, news, sex discrimination, sport, women by tracey

‘Caster Semenya’s enforced use of testosterone-limiting drugs is a potential human rights breach, legal experts claimed on Wednesday as they drew comparisons with the innate physical advantages of other world-dominating athletes.’

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Daily Telegraph, 1st May 2019

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Straining the Alphabet Soup: Part 1 — Anonymity orders in Personal Injury proceedings – UK Human Rights Blog

‘Amendments to CPR r.39.2; new Guidance issued by the Master of the Rolls; and a recent High Court decision refusing anonymity to a claimant prompt this review of anonymity orders in personal injury proceedings.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 30th April 2019

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Private Lives and Public Sorrows – Family Law Week

‘Hazel Wright, Partner with Hunters Solicitors, highlights three cases which have emphasised the usefulness to family lawyers of the Human Rights Act.’

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Family Law Week, 30th April 2019

Source: www.familylawweek.co.uk

Meet The Campaigners Behind The UK’s First Social And Economic Rights Bill – Rights Info

Posted April 26th, 2019 in bills, brexit, consultations, EC law, education, health, housing, human rights, news by sally

‘Two years ago, human rights campaigners Koldo Casla and Peter Roderick first discussed creating a bill enshrining social and economic rights in the UK. With a draft version now out for consultation, their vision is creeping closer to reality. Ella Braidwood finds out more.’

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Rights Info, 25th April 2019

Source: rightsinfo.org

Paying for privacy? – Family Law

‘Stuart Clark, partner at The International Family Law Group LLP examines a recent Court of Appeal decision on privacy in family law cases and asks whether in practice anonymity is the preserve of only the very wealthy.’

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Family Law, 16th April 2019

Source: www.familylaw.co.uk

Retention of crime reports about alleged teenage ‘sexting’ did not breach Article 8 – UK Police Law Blog

‘In R (CL) v Chief Constable of Greater Manchester & Secretary of State for the Home Department [2018] EWHC 3333 (Admin), the Divisional Court held that the retention by the police of crime reports which related to sexting incidents in which a schoolboy had allegedly been involved did not breach his rights under Article 8 ECHR.’

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UK Police Law Blog, 9th April 2019

Source: ukpolicelawblog.com

“Persons unknown” injunctions against future protest action – UK Human Rights Blog

‘In Boyd & Anor v Ineos Upstream Ltd & Ors [2019] EWCA Civ 515, the Court of Appeal handed down a fascinating judgment exploring the tension between the exercise of the rights to freedom of assembly and freedom of expression and the protection of property rights.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 10th April 2019

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Government immigration database ‘deeply sinister’, say campaigners – The Guardian

‘The Home Office is developing a database that could provide quick immigration checks to outside organisations amid criticism from campaigners, who call it “deeply sinister” and say it could amount to a “secret digital ID system”.’

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The Guardian, 10th April 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

Ethical impacts from AI “unimaginable”, says EU think tank – Legal Futures

‘Artificial intelligence (AI) software poses risks to society including tracking and identifying individuals, ‘scoring’ people without their knowledge, and powering lethal autonomous weapons systems, an influential EU group has warned.’

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Legal Futures, 11th April 2019

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

Ep 75: The Prevent Guidance in Universities – Marina Wheeler QC – Law Pod UK

Posted April 3rd, 2019 in freedom of expression, human rights, news, podcasts, terrorism, universities by sally

‘Emma-Louise Fenelon talks to Marina Wheeler QC about the recent Court of Appeal decision in Butt v Secretary of State for the Home Department and the operation of the Prevent Guidance generally.’

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Law Pod UK, 1st April 2019

Source: audioboom.com

English judge says man having sex with wife is ‘fundamental human right’ – The Guardian

‘A row has erupted after a judge spoke in court about the “fundamental human right” of a man to have sex with his wife.’

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The Guardian, 3rd April 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

The Inheritance Act and Adult Child Claimants – recent guidance from the Chancery Division – Family Law Week

‘Gwyn Evans, barrister of Tanfield Chambers, explains the court’s judgment in a recent Inheritance Act case involving an estranged adult claimant, reliant on state benefits, and defendants for whom inheritance was a windfall.’

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Family Law Week, 29th March 2019

Source: www.familylawweek.co.uk

In the matter of an application by Geraldine Finucane for Judicial Review (NI) [2019] UKSC 7 Part Two – UKSC Blog

Posted March 28th, 2019 in human rights, inquiries, murder, news, Northern Ireland, police, Supreme Court, terrorism by sally

‘The appellant argued that all the relevant evidence pointed to the decision not to hold the inquiry being a sham. The basis on which it had been suggested that this was a decision taken in the public interest was, Mrs Finucane argued, spurious. Moreover, the process of consultation and discussions was entirely cosmetic. The outcome had been predetermined. (See Lord Kerr’s summary of the grounds of challenge at paras 50-52)’

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UKSC Blog, 26th March 2019

Source: ukscblog.com

In the matter of an application by Geraldine Finucane for Judicial Revewi (NI) [2019] UKSC 7 Part One – UKSC Blog

Posted March 28th, 2019 in human rights, inquiries, murder, news, Northern Ireland, police, Supreme Court, terrorism by sally

‘On 27 February 2019 the Supreme Court gave judgment in the appeal brought by the widow of the Belfast solicitor, Pat Finucane, against the refusal of the Secretary for State for Northern Ireland to hold a public inquiry into her husband’s death. Giving the leading judgment, Lord Kerr (with whom Lady Hale, Lord Hodge and Lady Black agreed) allowed the appeal on the basis that there had been a breach of the investigative obligation under ECHR, art 2. The Supreme Court found that although Mrs Finucane had a legitimate expectation that there would be a public inquiry into Mr Finucane’s death she had not shown that the government’s decision not to fulfil this promise was made in bad faith or that it was not based on genuine policy grounds. Lord Carnwarth gave a concurring judgment in which he commented on the criticism that had been made of obiter remarks he had made in United Policyholders Group v Attorney General of Trinidad and Tobago [2016] UKPC 17 in relation in relation to the necessity for a detriment to have been suffered before a claim for substantive legitimate expectation could be made.’

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UKSC Blog, 26th March 2019

Source: ukscblog.com

How Does UK Human Rights Law Protect Football Players Like Raheem Sterling And Danny Rose From Racial Abuse? – Rights Info

Posted March 27th, 2019 in disciplinary procedures, fines, hate crime, human rights, news, racism, sport by sally

‘The England football team put on a striking performance during the Euro 2020 qualifier match against Montenegro in Podgorica on Monday.’

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Rights Info, 26th March 2019

Source: rightsinfo.org

The Extremism Database is in Breach of the European Convention on Human Rights – Oxford Human Rights Hub

‘On 24 January 2019, the European Court of Human Rights (the ECtHR) delivered its judgment in the case of Catt v. the UK and found that police powers to retain personal data in its Extremism Database is in breach of the European Convention on Human Rights.’

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Oxford Human Rights Hub, 26th March 2019

Source: ohrh.law.ox.ac.uk