ICTS (UK) Ltd v Visram (2020) EWCA 202 – Old Square Chambers

‘Do the words “return to work” in a long-term disability scheme mean return to any work or the work that the employee was undertaking prior to going on long term sickness?’

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Old Square Chambers, 24th February 2020

Source: www.oldsquare.co.uk

Claimant fails in judicial review challenge over Qualified One-Way Costs-Shifting and discrimination claims – Local Government Lawyer

‘A High Court judge has rejected a judicial review challenge over an asserted decision of the Lord Chancellor not to extend Qualified One-Way Costs-Shifting (QOCS) to discrimination claims in the County Court and/or the failure to extend QOCS to such claims.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 24th February 2020

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Court rejects judicial review over failure to extend QOCS – Litigation Futures

‘The High Court has rejected a challenge to the Ministry of Justice’s (MoJ) failure to extend qualified one-way costs shifting (QOCS) to discrimination claims in the county court.’

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Litigation Futures, 20th February 2020

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

Reasonable adjustments – Is it relevant that the employee didn’t mention them? – 3PB

‘The dispute arose from the claimant’s back problems, which, it was agreed, made her disabled within the Equality Act 2010. She was unable to travel far and wanted to work mainly from home. This caused difficulty because her role, auditing the performance of National Health Service bodies, was “client facing” and required her to visit those bodies. She was eventually dismissed for reason of ill-health capability after an occupational health report and negotiations with her union representative. The respondent was concerned that she was not meeting her financial targets, i.e. the required amount of chargeable time billed to the respondent’s clients. These receipts from clients funded her salary. There were not enough clients within the short travelling distance from her home that she could manage.’

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3PB, 7th February 2020

Source: www.3pb.co.uk

Council-owned company defends unfair dismissal claim from ADHD sufferer – Local Government Lawyer

‘A refuse collector has lost his claim for disability discrimination against Bristol Waste, a wholly-owned operation of Bristol City Council.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 20th February 2020

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

‘The victimisation was horrible’: why are so many disabled lawyers treated badly? – The Guardian

‘A new study says that more than half of disabled lawyers have experienced bullying or discrimination at work.’

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The Guardian, 11th February 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Disability Discrimination: Long-Term Requirement – Pallant Chambers

Posted February 11th, 2020 in disability discrimination, equality, news by sally

‘Until Tesco Stores Ltd v Tennant UKEAT/0167/19 there was no direct authority on whether it was possible to pursue claims of alleged disability discrimination during the 12-month period starting from the date the impairment met all the other requirements under the legislation.’

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Pallant Chambers, 5th February 2020

Source: www.pallantchambers.co.uk

Firm sacked paralegal days after emergency bowel surgery – Law Society’s Gazette

‘ Birmingham firm who dismissed a worker within days of him leaving hospital post-surgery have been found in breach of employment law by a tribunal.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 6th February 2020

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Law firm discriminated against disabled paralegal – Legal Futures

Posted February 6th, 2020 in disability discrimination, law firms, news, paralegals by sally

‘A law firm discriminated against a seriously ill paralegal by dismissing him after only three months while he was on sick leave, an employment tribunal has ruled’

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Legal Futures, 6th February 202

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

Government loses court appeal over short-changing disabled benefit claimants – The Independent

Posted January 30th, 2020 in appeals, benefits, disability discrimination, disabled persons, news by tracey

‘The government has lost two appeals against court judgments that found the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) had unlawfully discriminated against thousands of severely disabled people who were moved on to universal credit.’

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The Independent., 29th January 2020

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Disabled lawyers “face daily discrimination” – Legal Futures

‘Disabled lawyers face both overt and “unconscious” discrimination on a daily basis, such as “rituals, practices and attitudes that exclude or undermine them”, according to research published today.’

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Legal Futures, 24th February 2020

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

Remedies in First-tier Tribunal discrimination claims – Local Government Lawyer

‘A recent Upper Tribunal decision has potentially far-reaching implications for schools considering excluding pupils with disabilities, write Tom Amraoui and Rachel Sullivan.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 10th January 2020

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Sexual assault investigation into a child with learning difficulties not a breach of article 3 – Police Law Blog

‘In R (AB) v Chief Constable of Hampshire Constabulary [2019] EWHC 3461 (Admin), the Divisional Court considered a claim on behalf of a boy with severe learning and communication disabilities, that police had failed properly to investigate what appeared to be a disclosure by him of a sexual assault during a stay at in respite care. He argued that they had wrongly proceeded to interview him despite no witness intermediary being available and had subsequently failed to re-interview him with an intermediary. He argued that this was a breach of Article 3, and unlawful disability discrimination. The Court dismissed the claim, also giving important procedural guidance.’

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Police Law Blog, 17th December 2019

Source: ukpolicelawblog.com

Disabled woman called ‘lying bitch’ by welfare official awarded £5,000 – The Guardian

‘A disabled woman has been awarded £5,000 in an out-of-court settlement after being called a “lying bitch” by a welfare official in formal legal papers after challenging a decision to cut her disability benefits.’

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The Guardian, 12th December 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

‘National disgrace’: Hundreds of disabled people detained in UK hospitals for more than 10 years – The Independent

‘More than 350 people with special needs have been detained in hospitals for more than 10 years, analysis has revealed.’

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The Independent, 8th December 2019

Source: www.independent.co.uk

The Future Could Be Accessible, But Only If All Disability Shortlists Are Made Legal – Oxford Human Rights Hub

‘Tuesday 3 December marked the International Day of Persons with Disabilities (IDPWD), but with only one week to go until the UK General Election, the prospects of sufficient Members of Parliament with disabilities being elected looks dismal. The theme of the 2019 IDPWD is ‘The Future is Accessible’, examining what barriers need to be removed to enable full inclusion of people with disabilities. Reforming Section 104 of the Equality Act 2010 on selection of candidates to allow for All Disability Shortlists would remove a significant barrier. The legitimacy of our democracy and political engagement by disabled people requires it.’

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Oxford Human Rights Hub, 5th December 2019

Source: ohrh.law.ox.ac.uk

Legal advice privilege – 3PB

Posted December 4th, 2019 in admissibility, disability discrimination, evidence, news, privilege, redundancy by sally

‘The Claimant was employed as a Senior Legal Counsel by Shell until his dismissal, allegedly for redundancy, in January 2017. Whilst employed by Shell, he submitted a grievance and commenced an employment tribunal claim (“the First Claim”) for disability discrimination. In March 2017, he commenced a second ET claim (“the Second Claim). In broad terms, he alleged that Shell relied on a planned re-organisation of its in-house legal department as a pretext by which to terminate his employment by way of redundancy such that his dismissal was unfair, and that this was also unlawful discrimination and victimisation as a result of the First Claim and his grievance.’

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3PB, 4th November 2019

Source: www.3pb.co.uk

Disabled workers paid 12% less, ‘damning’ UK official figures show – The Guardian

‘Disabled people continue to face prejudice in the workplace campaigners have said, after latest government figures showed they were paid on average 12.2% less than those without impairments, equivalent to £1.48 an hour.’

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The Guardian, 2nd December 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

Tribunals and human rights – Nearly Legal

‘The question of the powers of the First Tier and Upper Tribunals (and indeed initial decision makers) to disapply secondary legislation where there is a breach of the appellant’s human rights has reached the Supreme Court. The decision has some far reaching implications for bedroom tax appeals and beyond.’

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Nearly Legal, 15th November 2019

Source: nearlylegal.co.uk

Bedroom tax, sanctuary schemes and human rights redux – Nearly Legal

Posted October 29th, 2019 in benefits, disability discrimination, domestic violence, housing, human rights, news by tracey

‘Case of J. D. and A. v United Kingdom 32949/17 34614/17. The Supreme Court (Lady Hale and Lord Carnwath dissenting) found justified discrimination in imposing the bedroom tax on a woman who, as a result of domestic violence, had had her home treated under the Sanctuary Scheme to include the modification of the attic to render it a “panic room”. (Our report here). The Supreme Court found that this was for a case by case evaluation, not something that required a blanket exemption for a class of people, and there were Discretionary Housing Payments possible. The European Court of Human Rights, in a 5/2 split decision, has now found that it was not justified discrimination.’

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Nearly Legal, 27th October 2019

Source: nearlylegal.co.uk