Fewer than one in six ‘hostile environment’ raids led to deportations – The Guardian

‘Fewer than one in six of more than 44,000 “intelligence-led” Home Office immigration enforcement raids on people’s homes since the introduction of the “hostile environment” policy have resulted in deportations, according to data obtained by the Guardian.’

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The Guardian, 21st February 2021

Source: www.theguardian.com

The Stansted 15’s quashed conviction shows we were never terrorists – The Guardian

Posted February 2nd, 2021 in airports, appeals, demonstrations, deportation, news, terrorism by sally

“I was one of 15 charged for blocking a deportation flight. We’ve got justice, but victims of the UK’s hostile environment haven’t.”

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The Guardian, 2nd February 2021

Source: www.theguardian.com

Stansted 15: Activists who stopped migrant deportation flight have convictions overturned – The Independent

Posted February 1st, 2021 in airports, appeals, demonstrations, deportation, human rights, immigration, news, trespass by tracey

‘A group of activists who stopped a deportation flight leaving Stansted airport have had their convictions overturned by the Court of Appeal.’

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The Independent, 30th January 2021

Source: www.independent.co.uk

6 UK Human Rights Issues And Trends To Watch In 2021 – Each Other

‘It’s clear that coronavirus will inevitably continue to be one of the biggest rights issues of 2021 – but it’s not the only thing that should be on our radar. This selection of things to look out for – some quite specific and some more general – is by no means exhaustive and, as the last year has shown, there’s no way we can accurately predict the future. However, there are pressing issues on the horizon – here are just a few, in no particular order.’

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Each Other, 8th January 2021

Source: eachother.org.uk

Article 3 psychiatric cases: history and latest developments (Part 1) – Ruby Peacock – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted January 8th, 2021 in deportation, human rights, mental health, news, suicide by tracey

‘In this two-part article, Ruby Peacock, an aspiring barrister and currently a legal and policy intern at the Legal Resources Centre in Cape Town, examines the history of medical claims brought under Article 3 of the European Convention on Human Rights.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 7th January 2021

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Judge refuses to free Julian Assange on bail as US appeals ruling against extradition – The Independent

Posted January 7th, 2021 in appeals, bail, deportation, mental health, news, surety by tracey

‘Julian Assange has lost an attempt to be freed on bail as he awaits a US appeal against a judge’s ruling that he cannot be extradited.’

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The Independent, 6th January 2021

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Strasbourg finds Nigerian man’s deportation violated article 8 – EIN Blog

Posted December 17th, 2020 in deportation, families, human rights, news by tracey

‘Unuane v United Kingdom – 80343/17 [2020] ECHR 832 (24 November 2020): In the case of Mr Unuane, a Nigerian national, who had been deported from the UK after a conviction for offences relating to falsification of immigration documents, the ECtHR found a violation of article 8 of the ECHR. Mr Unuane was deported after a conviction for offences relating to falsification of 30 applications for leave to remain in the UK and he was sentenced to five years and six months’ imprisonment, his appeal was unsuccessful. His Nigerian partner was also convicted of the same offence and, along with their three minor children, she was initially subject to a deportation order as well. Unlike Mr Unuane, their appeals were allowed, owing to the best interests of the children, and they remained in the UK. The SSHD was obliged to make a deportation order against Mr Unuane section 32(5) of the UK Borders Act 2007. The SSHD considered that he was a “foreign criminal” as defined by section 32(1) of the 2007 Act and accordingly his deportation, by virtue of section 32(4) of the 2007 Act, was deemed to be conducive to the public good. The FTT dismissed his appeal but the UT found that the FTT had materially erred in law. The UT found that “the wife needs him and she is staying” and “the boys need him”. However, it held that there were no “very compelling circumstances” and it dismissed the appeal. Reliance placed in Hesham Ali v SSHD [2016] UKSC 60 failed to satisfy the Court of Appeal which refused permission to appeal in 2017.’

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EIN Blog, 17th December 2020

Source: www.ein.org.uk

Home Office leaving stateless people facing detention and destitution, warns UN – The Independent

‘The Home Office is leaving stateless people in the UK at risk of homelessness, destitution and prolonged detention, the UN’s refugee agency has warned. A procedure designed to help regularise the status of stateless individuals in Britain is not functioning as well as it should due to procedural weaknesses and the approach to decision-making, the UNHCR said.’

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The Independent, 16th December 2020

Source: www.independent.co.uk

All Windrush victims to get at least £10,000 – BBC News

‘The government is to give more money to victims of the Windrush scandal, which saw hundreds of people wrongly threatened with deportation.’

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BBC News, 14th December 2020

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Deportation and family rights – UK Human Rights Blog

‘The European Court of Human Rights has found that the deportation of a Nigerian man from the United Kingdom violated his right to respect for private and family life guaranteed by article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights. The applicant in Unuane v United Kingdom successfully argued that his removal from the UK was a disproportionate interference with family life because it separated him from his children. Though finding for the applicant, the Court rejected his attack on the compatibility of the Immigration Rules – an issue that as recently as 2016 the Supreme Court had authoritatively settled. The decision is of interest for the Court’s approach to the necessary balancing exercise to be carried out in the sensitive area of human rights challenges to the deportation of foreign criminals.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 10th December 2020

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Home Office urged to ensure better access to legal advice after Jamaicans taken off flight in eleventh hour – The Independent

Posted December 3rd, 2020 in deportation, immigration, Jamaica, legal representation, news by tracey

‘The Home Office is being urged to ensure people facing deportation have adequate access to legal advice prior to their removal after tens of Jamaican nationals were taken off a charter flight following a last-minute legal intervention.’

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The Independent, 3rd December 2020

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Jamaican nationals taken off charter flight in eleventh hour over trafficking concerns – The Independent

‘A number of Jamaican nationals who were due to be deported have been granted last minute reprieve after the Home Office acknowledged they may be victims of modern slavery. Thirteen people were forcibly removed from the UK to Jamaica in the early hours of Wednesday. At least 10 of those who had been due to fly were taken off the flight hours before it was due to leave following legal intervention.’

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The Independent, 2nd December 2020

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Osime Brown: 55 MPs back calls to stop deportation of severely autistic man – The Independent

Posted November 26th, 2020 in autism, deportation, disabled persons, news, theft, young offenders by tracey

‘Dozens of MPs have backed calls to halt the deportation of a severely autistic man who was jailed as a teenager after being found guilty of stealing a mobile phone.’

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The Independent, 25th November 2020

Source: www.independent.co.uk

UK’s ‘no notice’ immigration policy unlawfully interfered with the right to access to justice, holds Court of Appeal – Oxford Human Rights Hub

Posted November 20th, 2020 in appeals, deportation, government departments, immigration, news, notification by sally

‘Until March 2019, the UK operated an immigration policy – set out in Chapter 60 of the General Instructions to Home Office caseworkers – that worked like this: if a migrant did not have leave to enter or remain in the UK (that is, if they were an “irregular migrant”), the Secretary of State for the Home Department could serve a “notice of removal window”. After a short notice period (usually just 72 hours), the “removal window” (usually 3 months) would open. During the removal window, the migrant could forcibly be removed at any time, without further warning.’

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Oxford Human Rights Hub, 16th November 2020

Source: ohrh.law.ox.ac.uk

Windrush: two years on, victims describe long waits and ‘abysmal’ payouts – The Guardian

‘Applicants to the Windrush compensation scheme have spoken about the difficulties they have experienced in securing payouts. Some are concerned by the long delays between applying and being awarded damages, others have expressed unhappiness about the amount they have been offered.’

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The Guardian, 19th November 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Windrush: At least nine victims died before getting compensation – BBC News

‘At least nine people have died before receiving money applied for through the Windrush compensation scheme, according to Home Office figures.’

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BBC News, 2nd November 2020

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Home Office Removals Policy Unlawful, holds Court of Appeal – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted October 27th, 2020 in deportation, human rights, immigration, ministers' powers and duties, news by sally

‘On 21/10/2020, the Court of Appeal ruled that the Home Office’s removal window policy (“the Policy”) was unlawful. The Policy incorporated an unacceptable risk of interference with the right of access to court by exposing a category of irregular migrants — including those who have claims in respect of their right to life and/or freedom from torture and inhuman or degrading treatment — to the risk of removal without any proper opportunity to challenge a relevant decision in a court or tribunal.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 27th October 2020

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Ministers must end their attacks on lawyers – The Guardian

‘Barristers, solicitors, legal academics and retired judges call for the home secretary and the prime minister to apologise for past remarks and refrain from using hostile language.’

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The Guardian, 25th October 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Lawyers call for apology from Johnson and Patel for endangering colleagues – The Guardian

‘The UK prime minister and the home secretary are accused of endangering the personal safety of lawyers through their abusive attacks on the profession and should apologise, more than 800 former judges and senior legal figures have said in a letter sent to the Guardian.’

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The Guardian, 25th October 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

When it attacks ‘lefty lawyers’, this government takes aim at the rule of law – The Guardian

‘The scorn shown by Boris Johnson and Priti Patel marks a departure from centuries of Conservative tradition.’

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The Guardian, 20th October 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com