Appellant fails in challenge to closure order barring him from accessing his flat – Local Government Lawyer

Posted February 26th, 2020 in appeals, drug offences, drug trafficking, housing, local government, news by sally

‘An appellant has lost his appeal over a closure order under the Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014 that meant he was barred from accessing his flat.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 26th February 2020

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Curing defects in section 8 notices seeking possession – what is the test? – St Ives Chambers

Posted February 26th, 2020 in chambers articles, housing, landlord & tenant, news, rent, repossession by sally

‘The Court of Appeal has recently considered whether the “reasonable recipient” test in Mannai Investment Co Ltd v Eagle Star Life Assurance Co Ltd [1997] UKHL 19 applies to notices served pursuant to s8 Housing Act 1988.’

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St Ives Chambers, 20th February 2020

Source: www.stiveschambers.co.uk

Environmental Law News Update – Six Pump Court

Posted February 26th, 2020 in chambers articles, environmental protection, housing, news, nuisance, privacy, waste, water by sally

‘In this latest Environmental Law News Update, Charles Morgan, Gordon Wignall and Natasha Hausdorff consider recent flooding events in the UK, the Tate Gallery viewing platform case and the rise in fly-tipping and organised crime.’

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Six Pump Court, 19th February 2020

Source: www.6pumpcourt.co.uk

Significant unlawful eviction case exposes the use of sham letting agreements by landlord companies in London – Garden Court Chambers

Posted February 26th, 2020 in chambers articles, damages, harassment, housing, landlord & tenant, news, repossession by sally

‘Tim Baldwin represented the Claimant, Noelia Del Rio Sanchez a University Student, on 10th and 11th February 2020 in a successful claim for unlawful eviction from and harassment at her accommodation in Brent by her former landlord, Simple Properties Management Limited. She secured general damages, special damages, damages for harassment, aggravated and exemplary damages of over £54,000. In addition the judge, HHJ Clarke, awarded costs against the landlords on an indemnity basis and an interim payment of £24,000 towards the costs.’

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Garden Court Chambers, 25th February 2020

Source: www.gardencourtchambers.co.uk

Conceptualising damages for housing conditions – they don’t add up – Nearly Legal

Posted February 25th, 2020 in damages, housing, landlord & tenant, news by sally

‘General damages will take two forms. The first, and probably least controversial, is that the tenant is not to be required to contribute towards the costs of the remedial works and, to the extent that there might be a contractual obligation to do so (e.g. by way of a service charge) damages need to be awarded: see Rendlesham Estates Plc v Barr Ltd [2014] EWHC 3968 (TCC), (2015) 1 WLR 3663 (a Defective Premises Act 1972 claim) and Daejan Properties Ltd v Griffin (2014) UKUT 0206 (LC) (a long leasehold service charge case).’

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Nearly Legal, 23rd February 2020

Source: nearlylegal.co.uk

Call for English councils to be given powers to regulate Airbnb – The Guardian

Posted February 24th, 2020 in holidays, hotels, housing, landlord & tenant, local government, news by sally

‘Local councils in England must be given powers to regulate Airbnb and other short-term letting sites in order to alleviate the “intolerable” pressure they put on the availability of local housing, the Green party MP, Caroline Lucas, has said.’

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The Guardian, 21st February 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Certainty of delivery of notices – Upper Tribunal on the burden of proof – Nearly Legal

‘A quick note on a Upper Tribunal (LC) appeal concerning whether services charge demands had been delivered. At first instance, the FTT had reached a decision about the reasonableness of the service charge demands, but in respect of the respondent, it held that the charges were not payable by the respondent because she had not received the demands.’

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Nearly Legal, 22nd February 2020

Source: nearlylegal.co.uk

You know what I mean – Errors in section 8 notices – Nearly Legal

Posted February 24th, 2020 in appeals, housing, landlord & tenant, news, notification, rent, repossession by sally

‘Does an error in a section 8 notice – in this case specifically as to the earliest date on which possession proceedings can begin – invalidate the notice?’

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Nearly Legal, 22nd February 2020

Source: nearlylegal.co.uk

High Court grants permission for planning judicial review challenge over alleged Equality Act breach – Local Government Lawyer

‘A High Court judge has granted permission for a planning judicial review challenge in part over an alleged breach of the public sector equality duty, Landmark Chambers has reported.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 21st February 2020

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

No-fault evictions: ‘Our lives are falling apart’ – BBC News

Posted February 20th, 2020 in housing, landlord & tenant, news, notification, repossession by sally

‘Section 21 of the 1988 Housing Act allows landlords to evict tenants without a reason once their contract comes to an end, or give them notice of the “intention to evict” two months before it ends. They are often used by landlords who want to sell their properties.’

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BBC News, 20th February 2020

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Court of Appeal provides guidance on “borough-wide” injunctions – No. 5 Chambers

‘Bromley LBC had secured a without notice interim injunction in the High Court which prohibited encampment and entry/occupation in relation to all accessible public spaces in the Borough except cemeteries and highways. These amounted to 139 parks, recreation grounds or open spaces, and 32 public car parks. Although the injunction was against “persons unknown”, it was widely understood that the injunction was aimed at the Gypsy and Traveller community.’

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No. 5 Chambers, 12th February 2020

Source: www.no5.com

Fearn & Ors v The Board of Trustees of the Tate Gallery – Falcon Chambers

Posted February 19th, 2020 in appeals, chambers articles, housing, human rights, news, nuisance, privacy by sally

‘The Neo Bankside development is a striking modern development designed by Richard Rogers and Partners (now Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners). It is on the south side of the River Thames and is adjacent to the Tate Modern, Britain’s National gallery of international modern art, which is based in the former Bankside Power Station.’

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Falcon Chambers, February 2020

Source: www.falcon-chambers.com

Revised pre-action protocols – St Ives Chambers

Posted February 17th, 2020 in chambers articles, housing, landlord & tenant, news, pre-action conduct, repairs by sally

‘Two important protocols have been revised that apply to social housing providers with effect from 13 January 2020.’

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St Ives Chambers, 4th February 2020

Source: www.stiveschambers.co.uk

British woman repeatedly trafficked for sex after Home Office failures – The Guardian

‘A young and highly vulnerable British sex trafficking victim was re-trafficked by county lines drug gangs on multiple occasions after the Home Office repeatedly refused to fulfil its legal obligation to provide her with safe accommodation.’

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The Guardian, 16th February 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Permitted Development (2) – the relationship to restrictive covenants – Exchange Chambers

‘The provisions in the Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development) (England) Order 2015 which permit changes of use from office to residential have been controversial, particularly in parts of the south of England where many local authorities fear the effects upon the supply of office accommodation in their areas. As a result, a number of authorities have exercised the powers in Article 4 of the Order to withdraw the rights from parts of their areas. A recent case in the Upper Tribunal (Lands Chamber) illustrates the issues involved where a Council adopts a different approach by attempting to rely on its rights as landlord to enforce leasehold restrictive covenants to prevent the implementation of a change of use proposal.’

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Exchange Chambers, 12th February 2020

Source: www.exchangechambers.co.uk

Beauty, Trees and Zoning – Exchange Chambers

‘As the United Kingdom begins to plot a new course outside the European Union, 2020 has begun with a flurry of reports (doubtless with one eye on the forthcoming Planning White Paper in England) recommending changes to planning law and land use policies, whether in the interests of economic development, more beautiful places, nature conservation or combatting climate change.’

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Exchange Chambers, 12th February 2020

Source: www.exchangechambers.co.uk

Adjacent flats: a new installation for Tate Modern? – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted February 14th, 2020 in appeals, housing, injunctions, news, nuisance, planning by sally

‘The Court of Appeal has just dismissed the actions in nuisance by residents of flats adjacent to the the Tate Modern art gallery on the south bank of the River Thames in central London. (Disclaimer: the author of this post has just moved into an apartment in the area but has no association with the flats or the residents central to this appeal.)’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 13th February 2020

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Housing Ombudsman issues guidance for landlords on responding to complaints – Local Government Lawyer

‘The Housing Ombudsman has published new guidance notes aimed at assisting landlords with policies and in responding to complaints.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 12th February 2020

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Having the last word in financial remedies – Becket Chambers

Posted February 6th, 2020 in divorce, evidence, financial provision, housing, news by sally

‘The recent case of AR v ML [2019] EWFC 56 is a cautionary tale against adducing further evidence at a late stage in an attempt to have the last say within financial remedy proceedings.’

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Becket Chambers, 3rd February 2020

Source: becket-chambers.co.uk

Out of time but not out of mind – Nearly Legal

‘We saw the High Court in this case take an incredibly strict approach to homelessness section 204 appeal timescales (our report), deciding that seeking legal aid representation could not be a good reason for filing an appeal out of time because, well, the substance of any appeal should be obvious to an unrepresented homeless applicant. We expressed considerable doubts about the realism of this decision at the time. Now, as it turns out, the Court of Appeal has had similar doubts.’

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Nearly Legal, 2nd February 2020

Source: nearlylegal.co.uk