Patents – Conversant Wireless Licensing v Huawei Technologies Co. Ltd and Others – NIPC Law

Posted February 24th, 2020 in case management, costs, disclosure, licensing, news, patents, proportionality by sally

‘This was an application by the claimant, Conversant Wireless Licensing SARL for disclosure of the licence agreements and assignments relating to 3G and 4G patents that had been entered by the defendants, Huawei Technologies Co Ltd., ZTE (UK) Limited and their British subsidiaries. Substantially the same application had been made to His Honour Judge Hacon at the case management conference in the action which took place in July 2019. The later application was heard by Mr Justice Birss who delivered judgment in Conversant Wireless Licensing SARL v Huawei Technologies Co. Ltd and others [2020] EWHC 256 (Pat) on 10 Feb 2020. The reference to the CMC in the transcript of Mr Justice Birss’s judgment is [2009] EWHC 1982 (Pat) but I think that must be a misprint for [2019].’

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NIPC Law, 22nd February 2020

Source: nipclaw.blogspot.com

Court of Appeal provides guidance on “borough-wide” injunctions – No. 5 Chambers

‘Bromley LBC had secured a without notice interim injunction in the High Court which prohibited encampment and entry/occupation in relation to all accessible public spaces in the Borough except cemeteries and highways. These amounted to 139 parks, recreation grounds or open spaces, and 32 public car parks. Although the injunction was against “persons unknown”, it was widely understood that the injunction was aimed at the Gypsy and Traveller community.’

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No. 5 Chambers, 12th February 2020

Source: www.no5.com

Impact on rape victims of police phone seizures to be reviewed – The Guardian

‘The impact on rape victims of police seizures of their mobile phones is to be examined as the Metropolitan police begin piloting a data inspection system designed to limit invasion of privacy.’

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The Guardian, 16th February 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Gypsies and Travellers – time for a rethink – Nearly Legal

‘Over the last few years, there has been a real growth in “all borough” injunctions against anticipated trespass by gypsies and travellers. As far as the Court of Appeal could tell, there seem to be 38 presently in force. For obvious reasons, once one authority obtains such an injunction, the pressure builds on other authorities to do likewise. Moreover, because the injunctions are usually sought against “persons unknown” there are rarely, if ever, any represented defendants.’

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Nearly Legal, 26th January 2020

Source: nearlylegal.co.uk

Court of Appeal rejects council bid for borough-wide injunction, issues guidance on tackling unauthorised encampments – Local Government Lawyer

‘The Court of Appeal has dismissed an appeal by the London Borough of Bromley over a High Court judge’s refusal to grant a borough-wide injunction on encampment at all accessible public spaces in the council’s area.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 21st January 2020

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

‘Victory’ For Traveller Communities Against Blanket Council Bans – Each Other

‘Local authorities who attempt to ban Travellers and Gypsies from vast swathes of public land risk breaching their “enshrined freedom” to roam the country, a court has ruled.’

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Each Other, 21st January 2020

Source: eachother.org.uk

Immigration and Article 8: what did we learn in 2019? – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted January 20th, 2020 in appeals, deportation, families, human rights, immigration, news, privacy, proportionality by sally

‘As in previous years, the courts in 2019 were particularly concerned with Theresa May’s attempts as Home Secretary to codify the Article 8 proportionality exercise into legislation. Those changes have had a significant impact on the approach of tribunals to appeals against deportation and removal on grounds of private and family life. Judges now have to apply a series of prescribed tests under the immigration rules, before going on to consider whether there are exceptional circumstances requiring a grant of leave.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 17th January 2020

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Home Office overhauls police complaints and discipline process – Home Office

‘Today (Friday 10 January) the Home Office is introducing legislation that will shake up how complaints made against the police are handled and improve the discipline system for officers.’

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Home Office, 10th January 2020

Source: www.gov.uk/home-office

“The Red line: Assessing “Proportionality” in Article 8 ECHR Family Rights” – Church Court Chambers

Posted December 4th, 2019 in citizenship, families, human rights, immigration, news, proportionality by sally

‘Islam Khan discusses a recent Court Of Appeal case in an immigration matter shifting the test on proportionality on Human Rights cases.’

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Church Court Chambers, 3rd December 2019

Source: churchcourtchambers.co.uk

Court of Appeal allows appeal over care and placement orders over failure by judge to give adequately reasoned judgment – Local Government Lawyer

‘The Court of Appeal has allowed an appeal brought by a great-aunt from care and placement orders made by a judge at the conclusion of proceedings concerning a two-year-old boy, J.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 19th November 2019

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

EPA prosecutions and costs – Nearly Legal

‘This was a judicial review of a costs order made by Camberwell Green Magistrates on a settled Environmental Protection Act 1990 s.82 prosecution. The Magistrates had refused to state a case for the consideration of the High Court.’

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Nearly Legal, 31st October 2019

Source: nearlylegal.co.uk

Proportionality – Compared with what? And how to assess – No. 5 Chambers

‘Proportionality has been the watchword in costs for such a length of time that one might have been tempted into thinking that ‘new learning’ on the topic was unlikely. The Court of Appeal’s decision in West v. Stockport NHS Foundation Trust/Demouilpied v. Stockport NHS Foundation Trust [2019] EWCA Civ 1220 (hereinafter “West”) provides fresh insight, however, in relation to both the matters that will be considered by a judge assessing the proportionality of costs, and also the procedure to be adopted.’

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No. 5 Chambers, 10th October 2019

Source: www.no5.com

ATE Insurance Premiums – one door closed, another opened? – No. 5 Chambers

Posted October 30th, 2019 in appeals, compensation, damages, hospitals, insurance, negligence, news, proportionality by sally

‘In July 2019 the Court of Appeal judgment was handed down in the joint appeals of West v Stockport NHS Foundation Trust and Demouilpied v Stockport NHS Foundation Trust [2019] EWCA Civ 1220. The judgment dealt with the contentious issue of recoverable ATE premiums and how they can be properly challenged.’

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No. 5 Chambers, 10th October 2019

Source: www.no5.com

Laura Nelson discusses Humayum Hussain v EUI Ltd (2019) – Park Square Barristers

Posted October 30th, 2019 in accidents, compensation, damages, news, proportionality, self-employment, taxis by sally

‘The court outlined the principles applying to self-employed drivers whom hire replacement vehicles whilst their own is off the road as a result of a road traffic accident. The true measure of loss is the loss of profit suffered whilst their own, damaged vehicle is reasonably off the road. Hire costs of replacement vehicles are prima facie recoverable, but where the cost of hire significantly exceeds the loss of profit, the court will ordinarily limit damages to the lost profit unless the claimant can establish that they had acted reasonably.’

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Park Square Barristers, 24th October 2019

Source: www.parksquarebarristers.co.uk

HMRC faces legal fight for handing Britons’ data to US tax officials – The Guardian

‘HMRC is facing a legal battle to block it from handing personal details about British citizens to US tax authorities. The case could have wide-ranging implications for tens of thousands of so-called accidental Americans who left the US when they were months or years old but risk having their British bank accounts frozen for failing to comply with the US tax requirements.’

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The Guardian, 12th September 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

Costs lawyers “see opportunities” in helping clients challenge bills – Litigation Futures

Posted September 3rd, 2019 in appeals, budgets, costs, news, proportionality, solicitors, statistics by sally

‘A majority of costs lawyers think there is a business opportunity in helping unhappy clients challenge their solicitors’ bills, a survey has found.’

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Litigation Futures, 3rd September 2019

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

Buffer zones around abortion clinic – judgment – Law & Religion UK

‘The BBC reports that pro-life protesters have lost their legal challenge against the UK’s first buffer zone around an abortion clinic. Ealing Council implemented a 100-metre exclusion zone at the Marie Stopes centre last year after women complained of being intimidated. The Good Counsel Network, which holds vigils outside the clinic in Ealing, west London, denied harassing women. Three Court of Appeal judges dismissed the bid to overturn the ban on protests directly outside the facility.’

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Law & Religion UK, 21st August 2019

Source: www.lawandreligionuk.com

Regulator looking at use of facial recognition at King’s Cross site – The Guardian

‘Information commissioner says use of the technology must be “necessary and proportionate.”‘

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The Guardian, 12th August 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

CA ruling on ATE and proportionality “a victory for access to justice” – Litigation Futures

Posted July 19th, 2019 in costs, insurance, news, proportionality by tracey

‘Yesterday’s Court of Appeal decision on proportionality and the recovery of after-the-event (ATE) insurance premiums was “a triumph for access to justice”, according to the insurer whose policy was under scrutiny.’

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Litigation Futures, 18th July 2019

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

Social housing and religion: R (Z & Anor) – Law & Religion UK

‘A non-Jewish woman, Z, had four children, including a son with autism. She was at the top of Hackney Council’s list for a four-bedroom home in the area. The co-defendant, the Agudas Israel Housing Association (AIHA), was founded in 1986 to provide social housing for Orthodox Jews in north London: it does not accept applications from anyone outside the Orthodox community. Six four-bedroom properties owned by AIHA became available but Ms Z was not allowed to apply for one of them. She sought judicial review of that refusal, arguing that it was unlawful and discriminatory for the AIHA to refuse her a home. As we noted, in R (Z & Ors) v Hackney London Borough Council & Anor [2019] EWHC 139 (Admin), a Divisional Court dismissed her claim, holding that a Jewish housing association might legitimately refuse to rent houses to those who were not Orthodox Jews. Z appealed.’

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Law & Religion UK, 5th July 2019

Source: www.lawandreligionuk.com