Gove admits ‘faulty’ guidance partly to blame for Grenfell fire – The Guardian

‘Michael Gove has admitted that “faulty and ambiguous” government guidance was partly responsible for the Grenfell Tower tragedy. The UK housing secretary said lax regulation allowed cladding firms to “put people in danger in order to make a profit”.’

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The Guardian, 29th January 2023

Source: www.theguardian.com

‘Special’ damages requiring prior knowledge of parties to construction contracts – OUT-LAW.com

Posted January 16th, 2023 in construction industry, contracts, damages, news by tracey

‘When a party breaches a term of a construction contract, the other party to the contract has the right to claim an award of damages.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 16th January 2023

Source: www.pinsentmasons.com

St James’s Oncology v Lendlease: the value of project-specific amendments to JCT contracts – Practical Law: Construction Blog

Posted January 13th, 2023 in construction industry, contracts, drafting, hospitals, indemnities, news by tracey

‘The recent judgment of the TCC in St James’s Oncology SPC Ltd (Project Co) v Lendlease Construction (Europe) Ltd and another provides a fascinating commentary on the importance of drafting a building contract that is tailored to deliver the needs of the employer and the end-user.’

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Practical Law: Construction Blog , 12th January 2023

Source: constructionblog.practicallaw.com

“The end of the beginning: 2021 in construction law” – Atkin Chambers

Posted January 5th, 2023 in building law, chambers articles, construction industry, coronavirus, news by sally

‘Rupert Choat highlights standout developments in construction law over the last 12 months as we sought to emerge from the pandemic.’

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Atkin Chambers, 16th December 2022

Source: www.atkinchambers.com

Termination and suspension of construction contracts – OUT-LAW.com

Posted December 9th, 2022 in construction industry, contracts, news by michael

‘Most construction contracts contain termination clauses which give parties the right to terminate in certain circumstances. Fewer construction contracts entitle a party to suspend the performance of its obligations.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 6th December 2022

Source: www.pinsentmasons.com

Contractual construction: the Tension – Practical Law: Construction Blog

Posted December 2nd, 2022 in construction industry, contracts, interpretation, news by tracey

‘When the courts are faced with questions of contractual construction there remains a tension in the approach they should take.’

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Practical Law: Construction Blog, 2nd December 2022

Source: constructionblog.practicallaw.com

The suitability of adjudication for multiparty disputes – Practical Law: Construction Blog

Posted November 25th, 2022 in construction industry, contracts, dispute resolution, news by tracey

‘Earlier this year I acted as adjudicator in four related adjudications that ran simultaneously, and I thought it would be worthwhile sharing my experience as I think there are some interesting points for parties and their representatives who might be considering using adjudication for multiparty disputes.’

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Practical Law: Construction Blog , 23rd November 2022

Source: constructionblog.practicallaw.com

Building Safety Act 2022: changing the rules on the landlord and tenant relationship – Practical Law: Construction Blog

‘The Building Safety Act 2022 (BSA 2022) creates a whole new world of building safety regulation and litigation. A key legislative objective was to regulate and direct responsibility for the cost of works to remedy building safety issues, so that the risk of such costs could no longer be the subject of agreement between landlord and tenant, but would (in defined circumstances) be apportioned in advance, by law, to the landlord.’

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Practical Law: Construction Blog, 16th November 2022

Source: constructionblog.practicallaw.com

When is it appropriate to use Part 8 in adjudication enforcement? – Practical Law: Construction Blog

‘The case of Breakshore Ltd v Red Key Concepts Ltd, as heard in the TCC earlier this year, reconfirms the court’s position in respect of when it is appropriate to use Part 8 claims to resist adjudication enforcement hearings.’

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Practical Law: Construction Blog, 11th November 2022

Source: constructionblog.practicallaw.com

How final is a final certificate? – Practical Law: Construction Blog

Posted October 28th, 2022 in appeals, construction industry, contracts, judgments, local government, news by tracey

‘At the end of last year, Jonathan discussed the Court of Session’s judgment in D McLaughlin & Sons Ltd v East Ayrshire Council, where Lord Clark looked at the conclusiveness of a final certificate under a Scottish Standard Building Contract with Quantities, 2011 Edition (SSBC, 2011 Edition). That case has popped up in the law reports again, this time in the Inner House (also called D McLaughlin & Sons Ltd v East Ayrshire Council), where three lords (Carloway, Woolman and Malcolm) have considered the Council’s appeal against Lord Clark’s judgment. In a rare occurrence these days, that judgment split the house.’

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Practical Law: Construction Blog , 26th October 2022

Source: constructionblog.practicallaw.com

Good faith: reliance on the repugnant – Practical Law: Construction Blog

Posted October 21st, 2022 in appeals, construction industry, contracts, news, Supreme Court by tracey

‘English law has, to put it mildly, a fractious relationship with the concept of good faith. There is a deep-rooted scepticism towards it that has often manifested as outright hostility: Lord Ackner famously described the duty to negotiate in good faith as “inherently repugnant to the adversarial position of the parties” (Walford v Miles). Indeed, the Supreme Court has recently confirmed that there is no general principle of good faith in English law (Times Travel (UK) Ltd and another v Pakistan International Airlines Corp).’

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Practical Law: Construction Blog , 19th October 2022

Source: constructionblog.practicallaw.com

Be certain, be specific and be clear: milestone judgment for liquidated damages – Practical Law: Construction Blog

Posted October 10th, 2022 in construction industry, contracts, damages, delay, drafting, news by tracey

‘Recent case law has shown how careful parties need to be when drafting a liquidated damages (LDs) regime. The case of Buckingham Group Contracting Ltd v Peel L&P Investments and Property Ltd provides yet another example of what can happen if there is any ambiguity in the drafting.’

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Practical Law: Construction Blog, 5th October 2022

Source: constructionblog.practicallaw.com

Cladding and fire safety: more reaction to Martlet v Mulalley – Practical Law: Construction Blog

Posted August 26th, 2022 in building law, construction industry, fire, health & safety, housing, news by tracey

‘At the end of last month, Tom Coulson and Amy Armitage discussed the decision of Martlet Homes Ltd v Mulalley & Co Ltd, the first decision from the TCC on fire safety defects following the Grenfell Tower tragedy. This decision is highly significant for the construction industry, given the number of similar cases which are either progressing through the courts or at the pre-action stage. Although the judge emphasised the fact-specific nature of the dispute, this decision provided some insight on the court’s likely approach to some of the significant issues that affect cladding disputes.’

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Practical Law: Construction Blog , 24th August 2022

Source: constructionblog.practicallaw.com

TCC provides reminder of the meaning of paragraph 9(2) of the Scheme – Practical Law: Construction Blog

Posted August 19th, 2022 in construction industry, dispute resolution, guarantees, insolvency, news by tracey

‘I appreciate that some of you might be reading this blog on your summer holidays, so you may well have far better things to be doing with your time (ordering another piña colada perhaps?). I will therefore keep the blog short – what might be termed a “blogette”. As one would expect over the summer break, there haven’t been many reported TCC cases recently and so the case I want to discuss today is from June, namely ML Hart Builders Ltd (in liquidation) v Swiss Cottage Properties Ltd, which is a judgment of Mr Roger Ter Haar QC sitting as a deputy High Court judge.’

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Practical Law: Construction Blog, 17th August 2022

Source: constructionblog.practicallaw.com

NEC and notices of dissatisfaction – Practical Law: Construction Blog

Posted August 15th, 2022 in construction industry, contracts, dispute resolution, news, notification by tracey

‘Getting the notice right is important for all construction contracts and NEC is no exception. Failing to issue a notice as required under the contract can have serious consequences and in NEC this is often an issue that arises in relation to the obligation to notify compensation events within an eight week period (clause 61.3 of NEC4 ECC). Another key issue arises in respect of the obligation to issue a notice of dissatisfaction within 28 days of an adjudicator’s decision, as a failure to do so will mean that such decision becomes final and binding, and cannot be challenged by referring it to the tribunal (clause W2.4(1) of NEC4 ECC). Three recent decisions have considered notices of dissatisfaction under NEC, highlighting the importance of getting it right.’

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Practical Law: Construction Blog, 10th August 2022

Source: constructionblog.practicallaw.com

The High Court’s approach to cladding claims – Local Government Lawyer

‘Judith Hopper and William Cursham analyse a recent ruling where a High Court judge awarded a housing association substantial damages in a claim relating to defective cladding.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 4th August 2022

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

TCC’s judgment in Martlet v Mulalley, a cladding fire safety dispute – Practical Law: Construction Blog

‘Cladding disputes have been ubiquitous in recent years. They are a consequence of the tragic fire at Grenfell Tower in June 2017, which led to a wave of inspections, investigations and scrutiny across the UK as building owners sought to ascertain whether or not their buildings were similarly defective. That process has resulted in numerous disputes relating to all sorts of different buildings – whether residential or commercial, old or new, publicly owned or private developments – which have kept practitioners extremely busy over the past five years.’

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Practical Law: Construction Blog, 28th July 2022

Source: constructionblog.practicallaw.com

Fire safety ruling has implications for cladding disputes – OUT-LAW.com

‘Construction companies contracted to design and build cladding systems for buildings may have to pick up the cost of replacing those systems in light of a new ruling by the High Court in London.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 25th July 2022

Source: www.pinsentmasons.com

How far does an interim valuation adjudication bind determination of the final account? – Practical Law: Construction Blog

Posted July 11th, 2022 in construction industry, dispute resolution, news, precedent by tracey

‘I was lucky enough to be asked to give a recent case law update lecture for the Adjudication Society. At the end one of the delegates asked a very sensible question, namely to what extent do matters decided by an adjudicator concerning an interim valuation bind later valuations. It’s an issue that I’ve been asked about before, and it’s also one of those that can promote polarising debate, with some extreme positions taken.’

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Practical Law: Construction Blog, 5th July 2022

Source: constructionblog.practicallaw.com

FTH v Varis Developments – adjudication and insolvency meet head on again – Practical Law: Construction Blog

‘In its decision in Bresco v Lonsdale, the Supreme Court confirmed that insolvent companies have the statutory and contractual right to adjudicate construction disputes, even if that claim is affected by insolvency set-off.’

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Practical Law: Construction Blog , 29th June 2022

Source: constructionblog.practicallaw.com