Duchy of Cornwall residents fight ‘unfair’ freehold ban – The Guardian

‘Prince Charles’s £1bn Duchy of Cornwall estate is facing a rebellion by residents who claim they are subject to an unfair ban on buying the freeholds to their homes.’

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The Guardian, 11th September 2017

Source: www.theguardian.com

JLK Limited v Emmanuel Chiedu Ezekwe (and others) [2017] UKUT 277 (LC) – Tanfield Chambers

Posted August 22nd, 2017 in appeals, housing, landlord & tenant, leases, news, service charges, tribunals by sally

‘The Upper Tribunal upheld the First Tier Tribunal’s decision that units of accommodation designed for students were ‘dwellings’, but overturned the decision that such units were ‘separate dwellings’. As such, the FTT did not have jurisdiction to determine the amount of service charges payable by the units’ leaseholders under sections 18 to 30 of the Landlord and Tenant Act 1985.’

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Tanfield Chambers, 31st July 2017

Source: www.tanfieldchambers.co.uk

Corvan (Properties) Limited v Maha Ahmed Abdel-Mahmoud [2017] UKUT 228 (LC) – Tanfield Chambers

Posted August 22nd, 2017 in agreements, landlord & tenant, leases, news, service charges by sally

‘The FTT had correctly ruled that a management agreement was for a term of more than twelve months, and therefore a long-term qualifying agreement for the purposes of s.20 of the Landlord and Tenant Act 1985.’

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Tanfield Chambers, 31st July 2017

Source: www.tanfieldchambers.co.uk

Leaseholds on new-build houses in England to be banned – The Guardian

Posted July 25th, 2017 in construction industry, housing, leases, news by sally

‘Builders are to be banned by the government from selling houses as leasehold in England and ground rents on flats could be cut to zero following widespread outrage over exploitative contracts.’

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The Guardian, 25th July 2017

Source: www.theguardian.com

Cant Pay – Nearly Legal

‘It is rare, if we are entirely honest, for a First Tier Tribunal decision on service charges to be exciting. It is even rarer for there to be mystery and police raids, and “Immunity from Treason” notices, and debts of “Trillions of pounds”, and something called an ‘equity lawyer’. Yet here they all are, and more, in what on the face of it was a dispute over annual service charges of about £1200.’

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Nearly Legal, 23rd July 2017

Source: nearlylegal.co.uk

Judge refuses permission in latest state aid challenge over sports stadium – Local Government Lawyer

Posted July 19th, 2017 in delay, evidence, judicial review, leases, local government, news, sport, state aids by sally

‘A High Court judge has refused the owners of Coventry City Football Club permission to seek judicial review in their latest state aid challenge over decisions taken by Coventry City Council.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 18th July 2017

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

‘Or’, ‘Or’ or ‘Or’: Construction of alternative notice provisions in a lease – Hardwicke Chambers

‘Earlier this year in the US, a legal case revolved around the use of an Oxford comma. Not to be outdone, last month the Court of Appeal in England & Wales had to determine the meaning of the word ‘or’; in doing so, they embarked upon a semantic analysis of one of the most common words in the English language, flavoured by the Supreme Court’s most recent case on construction of contracts.’

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Hardwicke Chambers, 15th June 2017

Source: www.hardwicke.co.uk

John Lyon’s Charity v London Sephardi Trust [2017] EWCA Civ 846 (CA) – Tanfield Chambers

‘On 29 June 2017 the Court of Appeal gave judgment on an interesting question of statutory construction concerning the valuation provisions in section 9 of the Leasehold Reform Act 1967 (“LRA67”) and the Interpretation Act 1978 (“the Interpretation Act”).’

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Tanfield Chambers, 29th June 2017

Source: www.tanfieldchambers.co.uk

The Reasonableness of Insurance Premiums – Tanfield Chambers

‘Leases generally require leaseholders to contribute to insurance of their block – whether by including the cost in the general service charges or by way of a separate charge known as an “insurance rent”.’

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Tanfield Chambers, 22nd June 2017

Source: www.tanfieldchambers.co.uk

Protection from prosecution for unlawful subletting at Grenfell Tower – Attorney General’s Office

‘Guidance has been issued to prosecutors not to bring charges for unlawful subletting at Grenfell Tower so that victims can be identified.’

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Attorney General's Office, 2nd July 2017

Source: www.gov.uk

Grenfell Tower fire: No prosecutions for subletting of flats, government promises – BBC News

Posted July 3rd, 2017 in fire, health & safety, leases, local government, news, prosecutions, rent by tracey

‘No-one will be prosecuted for illegally subletting a Grenfell Tower flat, the government says, as work continues to identify all those killed in the fire.’

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BBC News, 2nd July 2017

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Law firms, legal executives and licensed conveyancers join forces to lobby for leasehold reform

Posted June 21st, 2017 in conveyancing, housing, law firms, Law Society, leases, legal executives, news by sally

‘A new property law alliance, the Legal Sector Group (LSG), has written to the government, with a detailed set of proposals on leasehold reform.’

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Legal Futures, 21st June 2017

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

Southwark LBC v Akhtar Upper Tribunal [2017] UKUT 150 (LC) – Tanfield Chambers

‘The Upper Tribunal reversed decisions from the First Tier Tribunal in respect of the validity of estimated service demands, the requirements to prove the service of a notice under section 20B in light of the incorporation of section 196 of the Law of Property Act 1925 in the lease, and whether a tenant had waived the Landlord’s non-compliance with service charge mechanism of the lease by conduct.’

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Tanfield Chambers, 1st June 2017

Source: www.tanfieldchambers.co.uk

All or nothing? – Tanfield Chambers

Posted June 12th, 2017 in housing, leases, news by sally

‘A “share of the freehold” is a phrase that appears countless times in
sales particulars up and down the country. But in the words Frank Sinatra used in his first commercial recording back in 1932, these words may mean “all or nothing at all.”’

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Tanfield Chambers, 1st June 2017

Source: www.tanfieldchambers.co.uk

Oliver v Sheffield City Council [2017] EWCA Civ. 225 – Tanfield Chambers

‘A local authority was required to give credit to leaseholders for funds received from third-parties when recovering a contribution to the cost of major works.’

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Tanfield Chambers, 1st June 2017

Source: www.tanfieldchambers.co.uk

An unsatisfactory situation – Tanfield Chambers

‘Since the Supreme Court turned the law of dispensation from the consultation requirements upside down in Daejan Investments Ltd v Benson [2013] UKSC 14; [2013] 2 EGLR 45, the Upper Tribunal has been troubled with very few cases involving the requirements to consult leaseholders on major works. However, the decision in Lessees of Foundling Court and O’Donnell Court v Camden London Borough Council and others [2016] UKUT 366 (LC); [2016] EGLR 59 has rewritten preconceptions as to who needs to be consulted and caused landlords some new headaches.’

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Tanfield Chambers, 12th June 2017

Source: www.tanfieldchambers.co.uk

Southwark LBC v Akhtar and Stel LLC – Arden Chambers

‘The Upper Tribunal has held that an estimated service charge that had not been demanded in accordance with a lease would not have been payable but for the lessee taking out a loan from the lessor to pay it and thereby waiving strict compliance with the terms of the lease; s.7, Interpretation Act 1978 does not apply to notices served under the Landlord and Tenant Act 1985 unless a lease provides that s.196 Law of Property Act 1925 is to apply to the service of notices’

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Arden Chambers, 20th April 2017

Source: www.ardenchambers.com

In re Amin Abdulla v Whelan and others – WLR Daily

Posted April 27th, 2017 in bankruptcy, landlord & tenant, law reports, leases, rent by sally

In re Amin; Abdulla v Whelan and others [2017] EWHC 605 (Ch)

‘At the time of a bankruptcy order made against him, the bankrupt held a property with another person under the terms of an underlease for a term expiring on 31 July 2018. The trustee in bankruptcy served a notice of disclaimer under section 315 of the Insolvency Act 1986 disclaiming all of its and the bankrupt’s interest in the leasehold property under the terms of the underlease. The trustee, supported by the landlords, contended that the notice of disclaimer did not end the legal estate in the underlease and that the bankrupt’s estate remained liable for the payment of the rent until the expiry of its term. A person claiming to be one of the bankrupt’s creditors contended that the notice of disclaimer disclaimed all of the bankrupt’s interest in the underlease and that the bankrupt’s estate was liable for no further rent after the disclaimer. Judgment was given in favour of the trustee and landlords.’

WLR Daily, 20th April 2017

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

Somebody else’s money – Nearly Legal

‘Ms Oliver was the long leaseholder in a block of flats on the Lansdowne Estate, which was owned by the Council. The Council carried out city wide major works, which included works on the Lansdown Estate. Some of the works were eligible for a contribution from a commercial energy company as part of the Community Energy Savings Programme (“CESP”). In total 15 of the 25 blocks on the Lansdowne Estate were eligible to receive CESP funding. The contribution to Ms Oliver’s block was £43,570.44. The Council decided not to pass the CESP directly to the leaseholders as a set off against their service charge contributions. Rather, the Council decided to attribute the money to the funding of works to its city-wide housing stock. The effect of this was that every leaseholder’s service charge was reduced irrespective of whether their block had been entitled to CESP funding.’

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Nearly Legal, 10th April 2017

Source: www.nearlylegal.co.uk

Short term lets, long term consequences – Nearly Legal

Posted April 10th, 2017 in forfeiture, housing, injunctions, leases, news by sally

‘A couple of county court cases on Airbnb/short let use by leaseholders. One was reported in the newspapers, the other has not been reported anywhere before. Both show the potentially serious consequences of leaseholders letting out on short lets, where lease clauses arguably prevent it. We have seen the clause ‘use only as a private residence’ in the Upper Tribunal Nemcova, and subletting without consent, “otherwise than as a private residence for occupation by a single household” and carrying out a trade, business or profession from the Property in the FTT in LON/00AY/LBC/2015/0021. In both these cases, other lease clauses were involved, so there is an extension of the kind of clause catching Airbnb/short let use.’

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Nearly Legal, 7th April 2017

Source: www.nearlylegal.co.uk