What is the price of safety? And who pays the price? – Hardwicke Chambers

Posted June 18th, 2018 in fire, health & safety, inquiries, leases, news, repairs by sally

‘On 14 June 2017, 72 people were killed when a huge fire engulfed the Grenfell Tower Block in West London. As we approach the anniversary of that appalling disaster, the inquiry into what happened has only just begun, with harrowing accounts from witnesses and survivors. One thing that does seem clear however, is that the retro-fitted cladding which was applied to the outside of the tower was entirely useless in slowing the blaze. Indeed, it seems that the cladding was itself flammable, feeding the flames, and was fitted in such a way as to aid the spread of the blaze.’

Full Story

Hardwicke Chambers, 12th June 2018

Source: www.hardwicke.co.uk

Council “did not have vires to lease part of common to pre-school nursery” – Local Government Lawyer

Posted May 24th, 2018 in commons, education, leases, local government, news, ultra vires by tracey

‘The London Borough of Wandsworth did not have the vires to lease premises situated on a common to a private pre-school operator, the Court of Appeal has ruled.’

Full Story

Local Government Lawyer, 23rd May 2018

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Leasehold law reform work will improve lives of millions – Hopkins – Law Commission

Posted April 30th, 2018 in enfranchisement, Law Commission, leases, press releases by tracey

‘Professor Nick Hopkins has pledged that the Law Commission’s leasehold reform recommendations to government will provide a “better deal for leaseholders”. Announced as part of the 13th Programme of Law Reform, the Law Commission residential leasehold and commonhold project aims to improve consumer choice, provide greater fairness, and make the process of enfranchisement easier, quicker and more cost effective.’

Full press release

Law Commission, 27th April 2018

Source: www.lawcom.gov.uk/

Law Commission seeks views on boosting take-up of commonhold – OUT-LAW.com

Posted March 12th, 2018 in housing, Law Commission, leases, news by sally

‘The Law Commission is seeking views on why the “little-known and little used” commonhold model of home ownership has not become a popular alternative to residential leasehold.’

Full Story

OUT-LAW.com, 9th March 2018

Source: www.out-law.com

One bad reason need not cancel out withholding of consent – OUT-LAW.com

Posted March 8th, 2018 in appeals, consent, landlord & tenant, leases, news, reasons by tracey

‘A landlord which withholds its consent to a lease assignment will not necessarily be doing so unreasonably where it has multiple reasons for doing so, and only one of those reasons is itself unreasonable.’

Full Story

OUT-LAW.com, 7th March 2018

Source: www.out-law.com

Home-ownership call for evidence – help make commonhold more common – Law Commission

Posted February 23rd, 2018 in consultations, Law Commission, leases, press releases, sale of land by tracey

‘The Law Commission is asking flat owners, housebuilders, mortgage lenders and lawyers to help shape a law which could help people own their flats outright. The independent legal body wants views on a little-known and little used home ownership status called commonhold, which provides an alternative to residential leasehold.’

Full press release

Law Commission, 22nd February 2018

Source: www.lawcom.gov.uk/

Fire Safety – Who Pays? – Nearly Legal

Posted February 5th, 2018 in costs, fire, health & safety, housing, landlord & tenant, leases, news, repairs by sally

‘Since the extent of the issues with the cladding to blocks of flats became clear after Grenfell, and it became clear that private blocks as well as social were affected, we have been waiting for the beginning of the legal fall out over who was to pay for rectifying the problems. For leaseholders in those blocks, this was always going to be a very serious issue.’

Full Story

Nearly Legal, 4th February 2018

Source: nearlylegal.co.uk

Landmark leasehold case fails to slash extension costs – The Guardian

Posted January 25th, 2018 in appeals, costs, leases, news by tracey

‘Campaigners have failed in a long-running legal battle to slash leasehold costs after the court of appeal ruled in favour of a major London freeholder. The case, Mundy v the Sloane Stanley Estate, involved a small flat in Chelsea where the lease had fallen to less than 23 years and the freeholder was seeking £420,000 to agree an extension.’

Full Story

The Guardian, 24th January 2018

Source: www.theguardian.com

Property market braces for shockwaves from landmark leasehold case – The Guardian

Posted January 15th, 2018 in appeals, housing, leases, news by sally

‘One of Britain’s richest men, the Duke of Westminster, could see the value of his estates plummet this week if a landmark legal challenge is successful. The case could also benefit 2m households across England and Wales.’

Full Story

The Guardian, 14th January 2018

Source: www.theguardian.com

Ryan v Villarosa [2017] UKUT 466 (LC) – Tanfield Chambers

Posted January 9th, 2018 in landlord & tenant, leases, news, repairs, tribunals by sally

‘In a conflict between a clear scheme of covenants and complimentary service charge machinery, and ambiguous declarations as to the relationship between one of the parties to the lease and a third party, (both contained in the same lease) the scheme takes precedence and is binding on the parties – coherence trumps uncertainty where provisions are in conflict.’

Full Story

Tanfield Chambers, 8th January 2018

Source: www.tanfieldchambers.co.uk

Beach huts: chattels, leases, estoppel – Nearly Legal

Posted January 9th, 2018 in estoppel, housing, leases, news by sally

‘Gilpin and ors v Legg [2017] EWHC 3220 (Ch) is a gift (at least to land law examiners) that is going to keep on giving. This is not just because of the claims discussed – whether beach huts were fixtures or chattels, whether a lease had been granted to the owners of the huts, whether the landowner was estopped from obtaining possession, and even certain pleadings issues (the pleadings do seem to have been a little, erm, jejeune) – but also because HHJ Matthews (who I’m ashamed to say I haven’t come across) added his tuppenies to a couple of controversies, not least making some important observations on the correctness of the Supreme Court judgment in Berrisford v Mexfield. Part of the problem in the case was that the events which underpinned the various claims happened over many years, were oral, and, in some cases, involved transfers of title (the issues of which were neatly stepped over by the judge who referred to bona fide purchasers, so we might be dealing with unregistered land, a point not made clear).’

Full Story

Nearly Legal, 8th January 2018

Source: nearlylegal.co.uk

Burnley Hall LLP v Domicilium Limited (Chancery Division, 14 November 2017) – Falcon Chambers

Posted December 8th, 2017 in arbitration, capital allowances, leases, news by sally

‘Burnley Hall brought a claim for specific performance of a put option agreement. The agreement was part of a broader transaction by which the claimant, a limited liability partnership, entered into a joint venture for the development of student accommodation. The venture was entered into on condition that Business Premises Renovation Allowances (under Part 3A of the Capital Allowances Act 2001) would be available and in the event that they were not, Burnley Hall secured the right to extricate itself from the transaction by exercising a put option to require the defendants to take back the leases they had granted and to repay the sums invested by the individuals behind the LLP.’

Full Story

Falcon Chambers, 14th November 2017

Source: www.falcon-chambers.com

Incurred and incurred again – Nearly Legal

‘Under section 20B(1) Landlord and Tenant Act 1985, a service charge must be demanded of the tenant within 18 months of the relevant cost having been incurred by the landlord. But what happens when there is a head landlord demanding a charge from an intermediate landlord who, in turn, passes the cost on to their lessees? When does the 18 months run from?’

Full Story

Nearly Legal, 1st December 2017

Source: nearlylegal.co.uk

Autumn Newsletter – Falcon Chambers

– Prescriptive easements – a glass half-full: out with the negative; in with the positive 10

– Keeping the Title Clean: Unwanted Notices and Restrictions 12

– Estoppel in Pre-Contractual Negotiations 15

– The Curse of the Freebie 17

– Voidable and no Mistake 20

Full Story

Falcon Chambers, November 2017

Source: www.falcon-chambers.com

Challenging the cost of insurance – Tanfield Chambers

Posted October 20th, 2017 in insurance, landlord & tenant, leases, news by sally

‘It is frequently common for lessees to complain that the decision of a landlord to insure the freehold building with a particular insurer or under a particular policy is unreasonable because it is too expensive. Often the complaint is based on the lessee having found an alternative quote that does not include the same level of cover as is deemed necessary by the landlord. Sometimes, however, there are also cases where lessees find “like for like” quotes that are significantly cheaper than that obtained by the landlord. While it is well established that s.19, Landlord and Tenant Act 1985 does not require a landlord to obtain services at the cheapest cost, where there is evidence that the market will generally provide those services at a significantly lower price the First-tier Tribunal is more likely to find that the costs incurred by the landlord are not reasonable.’

Full Story

Tanfield Chambers, 19th October 2017

Source: www.tanfieldchambers.co.uk

Duchy of Cornwall residents fight ‘unfair’ freehold ban – The Guardian

‘Prince Charles’s £1bn Duchy of Cornwall estate is facing a rebellion by residents who claim they are subject to an unfair ban on buying the freeholds to their homes.’

Full Story

The Guardian, 11th September 2017

Source: www.theguardian.com

JLK Limited v Emmanuel Chiedu Ezekwe (and others) [2017] UKUT 277 (LC) – Tanfield Chambers

Posted August 22nd, 2017 in appeals, housing, landlord & tenant, leases, news, service charges, tribunals by sally

‘The Upper Tribunal upheld the First Tier Tribunal’s decision that units of accommodation designed for students were ‘dwellings’, but overturned the decision that such units were ‘separate dwellings’. As such, the FTT did not have jurisdiction to determine the amount of service charges payable by the units’ leaseholders under sections 18 to 30 of the Landlord and Tenant Act 1985.’

Full Story

Tanfield Chambers, 31st July 2017

Source: www.tanfieldchambers.co.uk

Corvan (Properties) Limited v Maha Ahmed Abdel-Mahmoud [2017] UKUT 228 (LC) – Tanfield Chambers

Posted August 22nd, 2017 in agreements, landlord & tenant, leases, news, service charges by sally

‘The FTT had correctly ruled that a management agreement was for a term of more than twelve months, and therefore a long-term qualifying agreement for the purposes of s.20 of the Landlord and Tenant Act 1985.’

Full Story

Tanfield Chambers, 31st July 2017

Source: www.tanfieldchambers.co.uk

Leaseholds on new-build houses in England to be banned – The Guardian

Posted July 25th, 2017 in construction industry, housing, leases, news by sally

‘Builders are to be banned by the government from selling houses as leasehold in England and ground rents on flats could be cut to zero following widespread outrage over exploitative contracts.’

Full Story

The Guardian, 25th July 2017

Source: www.theguardian.com

Cant Pay – Nearly Legal

‘It is rare, if we are entirely honest, for a First Tier Tribunal decision on service charges to be exciting. It is even rarer for there to be mystery and police raids, and “Immunity from Treason” notices, and debts of “Trillions of pounds”, and something called an ‘equity lawyer’. Yet here they all are, and more, in what on the face of it was a dispute over annual service charges of about £1200.’

Full Story

Nearly Legal, 23rd July 2017

Source: nearlylegal.co.uk