Rebecca Hill examines the key legal themes in Extradition Proceedings from 2019 – 5 SAH

Posted February 26th, 2020 in chambers articles, extradition, news by sally

‘Reflecting on the key legal themes of 2019 in Extradition cases, it was apparent that two issues had dominated court time in 2019; 1) prison conditions (as ever) and 2) whether Public Prosecutors are sufficiently independent to be treated as ‘Judicial Authorities’ for the purposes of the Act and the Framework Decision. Having reviewed the jurisprudence Rebecca Hill has produced a summary of key points in respect of each issue.’

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5 SAH, 21st February 2020

Source: www.5sah.co.uk

“The Magnitsky Act – What Now for the Future in the UK” An Article by Lesley Manley – Church Court Chambers

Posted February 26th, 2020 in chambers articles, human rights, money laundering, news by sally

‘The “Magnitsky Act” is a trailblazing piece of legislation enacted by the United States. Lesley Manley looks at developments thus far in the UK and considers how the UK jurisdictions will proceed following the withdrawal from the European Union.’

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Church Court Chambers, 26th February 2020

Source: churchcourtchambers.co.uk

Developments since Keyworker Homes – Exchange Chambers

Posted February 26th, 2020 in administrators, chambers articles, electronic filing, insolvency, news by sally

‘In a judgment which disagreed with the recently reported decisions of Re Skeggs Beef Limited[2019] EWHC 2607 (Ch) and Re SJ Henderson and Co Ltd [2019] EWHC 2742 (Ch), HHJ Hodge QC sitting as a Judge of the High Court found:

1) Notices of Intention to Appoint Administrators (“NOI”) can be filed at any time via e-filing and take effect at the time they are filed via e-filing.
2) Directors or the Company can make out of hours appointments of Administrators by filing a Notice of Appointment (“NOA”) at any time via e-filing. The appointment will take effect at the time the documents are filed via e-filing.
3) That for the purposes of the computation of the period of 10 business days pursuant to para 28(2) of Sch.B1 of the Insolvency Act 1986, the first business day will be the business day after the date on which the NOI was filed – thus it is a ‘clear days’ calculation.’

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Exchange Chambers, 20th February 2020

Source: www.exchangechambers.co.uk

Significant unlawful eviction case exposes the use of sham letting agreements by landlord companies in London – Garden Court Chambers

Posted February 26th, 2020 in chambers articles, damages, harassment, housing, landlord & tenant, news, repossession by sally

‘Tim Baldwin represented the Claimant, Noelia Del Rio Sanchez a University Student, on 10th and 11th February 2020 in a successful claim for unlawful eviction from and harassment at her accommodation in Brent by her former landlord, Simple Properties Management Limited. She secured general damages, special damages, damages for harassment, aggravated and exemplary damages of over £54,000. In addition the judge, HHJ Clarke, awarded costs against the landlords on an indemnity basis and an interim payment of £24,000 towards the costs.’

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Garden Court Chambers, 25th February 2020

Source: www.gardencourtchambers.co.uk

Tecnicas Reunidas Saudia for Services and Contracting Co. Ltd. v. Korea Development Bank – Atkin Chambers

Posted February 26th, 2020 in chambers articles, guarantees, interpretation, news by sally

‘Rupert Choat and CMS Cameron McKenna Nabarro Olswang LLP were successful in obtaining summary judgment against Korea Development Bank (KDB) in the Technology and Construction Court on 14 February 2020. KDB was ordered to pay the full value of a demand guarantee (£8.2 million) plus interest and costs.’

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Atkin Chambers, 20th February 2020

Source: www.atkinchambers.com

Dual criminality in extradition proceedings – 5 SAH

Posted February 26th, 2020 in chambers articles, extradition, foreign jurisdictions, news by sally

‘Dual criminality is a concept extradition practitioners will be very familiar with. Under s64/65 or s137/138 of the Extradition Act 2003, there is a need for the conduct described within the warrant to amount to an offence within the UK. Three recent High Court decisions in this area highlight however that the issue is one which is highly fact-dependent and cannot be taken for granted in relation to any set of offences.’

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5 SAH, 20th February 2020

Source: www.5sah.co.uk

Out of the Ordinary: Rob Hunter and Bethany Sanders on the Courts’ Approach to Life Expectancy Evidence – Devereux Chambers

Posted February 21st, 2020 in chambers articles, damages, expert witnesses, news, personal injuries by sally

‘In this December article for Personal Injury Focus, Devereux’s Rob Hunter and Bethany Sanders of Leigh Day explore the complexity of life expectancy evidence, providing background, comment, and practice advice on the issue.’

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Devereux Chambers, 14th February 2020

Source: www.devereuxchambers.co.uk

PBS Energo AS v Bester Generacion UK Ltd & Anor [2020] EWHC 223 (TCC) – Atkin Chambers

Posted February 21st, 2020 in building law, chambers articles, construction industry, contracts, news by sally

‘On 7 February 2020 Mrs Justice Cockerill DBE handed down judgment in PBS Energo AS v Bester Generacion UK Ltd & Anor [2020] EWHC 223 (TCC). Steven Walker QC and Tom Owen appeared for Bester instructed by Rebecca Williams of Watson Farley Williams.’

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Atkin Chambers, 7th February 2020

Source: www.atkinchambers.com

Court of Protection Newsletter #17 – Spire Barrister

Posted February 21st, 2020 in chambers articles, Court of Protection, news by sally

‘Welcome to the February issue of Spire Barristers’ Public Law Newsletter covering news from around the web, practice updates and case reviews in Court of Protection and Public Law matters.’

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Spire Barrister, 14th February 2020

Source: spirebarristers.co.uk

Onus of Proof in Business Rates Complaints – 33 Bedford Row

Posted February 21st, 2020 in burden of proof, chambers articles, complaints, local government, news, rates by sally

‘Where a Local Authority (the ‘Billing Authority) applies by way of complaint to the Magistrates Court for a liability order against an alleged ratepayer, for allegedly due but unpaid, national non-domestic rates (‘Business Rates’), the Magistrates Court will issue a summons requiring the alleged ratepayer to attend the Magistrates Court to answer the complaint (the ‘Complaint’).’

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33 Bedford Row, 16th February 2020

Source: www.33bedfordrow.co.uk

Reasonable adjustments – Is it relevant that the employee didn’t mention them? – 3PB

‘The dispute arose from the claimant’s back problems, which, it was agreed, made her disabled within the Equality Act 2010. She was unable to travel far and wanted to work mainly from home. This caused difficulty because her role, auditing the performance of National Health Service bodies, was “client facing” and required her to visit those bodies. She was eventually dismissed for reason of ill-health capability after an occupational health report and negotiations with her union representative. The respondent was concerned that she was not meeting her financial targets, i.e. the required amount of chargeable time billed to the respondent’s clients. These receipts from clients funded her salary. There were not enough clients within the short travelling distance from her home that she could manage.’

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3PB, 7th February 2020

Source: www.3pb.co.uk

Muslim Non-Marriages – Becket Chambers

Posted February 21st, 2020 in appeals, chambers articles, divorce, Islam, islamic law, marriage, news by sally

‘In 1999, Jerry Hall and Mick Jagger separated and in a move heralding a long and acrimonious legal battle, Jagger sensationally released a public statement saying that he would be contesting Jerry Hall’s petition for divorce on the grounds that he and Jerry Hall were not and never had been married!’

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Becket Chambers, 17th February 2020

Source: becket-chambers.co.uk

Strike Out: seriousness of default and possibility of a fair trial require careful consideration – 3PB

‘The Claimant (herein after referred to as “C”) was employed by the Respondent (herein after referred to as “R”) as a caseworker from 4 August 2016 until her dismissal on 8 December 2016, with the grounds for dismissing her being ones of conduct and performance during her probationary period.’

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3PB, 7th February 2020

Source: www.3pb.co.uk

Fatal Accident Act Apportionment – a pragmatic solution to an unusual problem? – 12 King’s Bench Walk

Posted February 21st, 2020 in accidents, apportionment, bereavement, chambers articles, children, damages, families, news by sally

‘The decision of Master Cook in ARN v Ageas Insurance Ltd (27/1/2020), when approving a Fatal Accident Act settlement involving four children, provides a novel and pragmatic solution to a difficult apportionment problem. A single mother was killed in a road traffic accident, leaving four young children. The children were the deceased’s only dependants and their claim was settled for a substantial lump sum.’

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12 King's Bench Walk, 13th February 2020

Source: www.12kbw.co.uk

Issues of consent in fact-find hearing – Becket Chambers

‘In December 2019 Ms. Justice Russell DBE heard an appeal from a fact-finding hearing that took place in private law Children Act proceedings at the Central Family Court in London in the summer of 2019. Her judgement was given in January 2020 and is reported as JH v. MF [2020] EWHC 86 (Fam).’

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Becket Chambers, 17th February 2020

Source: becket-chambers.co.uk

Restraining Presentation or Advertisement of a Creditor’s Winding Up Petition – 33 Bedford Row

Posted February 20th, 2020 in abuse of process, chambers articles, injunctions, news, notification, winding up by sally

‘Widespread knowledge that a company is subject to a creditor’s winding up petition can cause that company serious harm. Where the creditor’s winding up petition is warranted, this harm may just be an unfortunate consequence of a valid legal process being pursued against it. However, where the creditor’s winding up petition is unwarranted, and is eventually dismissed because it is unwarranted, its dismissal will be ‘cold comfort’ to the company where, in the intervening period between presentation and dismissal, the company has suffered irreparable reputational and operational damage.’

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33 Bedford Row, 4th February 2020

Source: www.33bedfordrow.co.uk

5SAH Extradition and International update: February 2020 – 5SAH

Posted February 20th, 2020 in brexit, chambers articles, extradition, Ireland, news by sally

‘Welcome to our February 2020, 5SAH Extradition and International quarterly newsletter. We are pleased to present a variety of articles from our team of specialist extradition and international law barristers.’

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5SAH, 13th February 2020

Source: www.5sah.co.uk

Fraudulent Non-Disclosure Claim in Property Joint Venture Case Fails – Littleton Chambers

Posted February 19th, 2020 in chambers articles, conspiracy, disclosure, fiduciary duty, fraud, joint ventures, news by sally

‘The claimant (Mr Russell) was one of four individuals involved in a joint venture property development business. The parties entered into a joint venture agreement which obliged them to act with good faith towards each other, in certain limited respects. Mr Russell departed the business pursuant to the terms of a settlement deed. Shortly after that deed was executed, the remaining parties entered into an attractive development project that Mr Russell claimed the other parties did not tell him about, or give him the opportunity to participate in. Mr Russell claimed he was wrongfully excluded by the dishonest actions of the other joint venturers. The claims alleged were: (a) breach of fiduciary duty; (b) breach of the express/implied terms of the joint venture agreement; (c) fraudulent non-disclosure; (d) unlawful means conspiracy. As a result of the terms of the settlement deed, Mr Russell needed to establish fraud or dishonesty to succeed.’

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Littleton Chambers, 13th February 2020

Source: www.littletonchambers.com

Has the test for whether or not an appeal should be allowed in respect of a case management decision, as laid down in O’Cathail v Transport for London, been impliedly overruled by R (Osborn) v Parole Board? No, says the EAT in Chowdhury v Marsh Farm Futures UKEAT/0473/18/DA – 3PB

‘Employment Tribunal judges have a wide discretion when making case management decisions, with it being rare for a challenge to such a decision being successful. The Court of Appeal in O’Cathail v Transport for London [2013] IRLR 310 have made it clear that tribunal decisions can only be questioned for error of law. The specific issue in that case was whether or not it was an error of law for a Tribunal to refuse a postponement application in circumstances in which a litigant in person had a fit note saying they were not fit to attend the hearing. The application was refused and the trial went ahead in his absence.’

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3PB, 7th February 2020

Source: www.3pb.co.uk

Ethical veganism: a philosophical belief – 3PB

‘The Claimant, Mr Casamitjana, was dismissed from his role at the League Against Cruel Sports in April 2018 after disclosing to colleagues that the company’s pension funds were being invested ‘unethically’. This was considered by the Respondent to be contrary to a management instruction not to provide financial advice to his colleagues. The Claimant brought claims of indirect discrimination, direct discrimination/harassment and victimisation by reference to his belief in ethical veganism, and PIDA detriment and dismissal, and wrongful dismissal.’

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3PB, 7th February 2020

Source: www.3pb.co.uk