Court of Appeal: Expert was not under “fiduciary duty” to client – Litigation Futures

Posted January 14th, 2021 in conflict of interest, contracts, expert witnesses, fiduciary duty, news by tracey

‘The Court of Appeal has overturned the first decision in England and Wales to hold that an expert witness owed a fiduciary duty to their client.’

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Litigation Futures, 13th January 2021

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

Domestic abuse victims wrongly charged over £150 from GPs for letters confirming injuries – The Independent

Posted January 8th, 2021 in doctors, domestic violence, expert witnesses, fees, legal aid, news, victims by tracey

‘Domestic abuse victims are being wrongly charged over £150 by GPs for letters proving their injuries which are often required to access legal aid or other crucial services.’

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The Independent, 7th January 2021

Source: www.independent.co.uk

R v Broughton Clarifying Causation in Gross Negligence Manslaughter – 2 Hare Court

Posted November 17th, 2020 in causation, drug abuse, evidence, expert witnesses, homicide, negligence, news by sally

‘In 2017 a 24-year-old woman, Louella Fletcher Michie, died at the Bestival Music Festival, having taken 2-CP, a Class A drug, supplied by her boyfriend, the appellant.’

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2 Hare Court, November 2020

Source: www.2harecourt.com

Lessons for property lawyers from ‘holiday illness’ claim : Is the Court obliged to accept ‘unopposed’ expert evidence? – Hardwicke Chambers

Posted November 17th, 2020 in evidence, expert witnesses, news, personal injuries by sally

‘The High Court appeal in Griffiths v TUI [2020] EWHC 2268 handed down in August 2020 has been much remarked on by personal injury lawyers, but the decision is also of interest for cases in the business and property courts, as it places a significant restriction on the role of the Court in cases of “unopposed” expert evidence.’

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Hardwicke Chambers, 4th November 2020

Source: hardwicke.co.uk

Hodge worries about impact of pandemic on young lawyers – Litigation Futures

‘The deputy president of the Supreme Court has expressed fears that young lawyers have been unable to train properly during the pandemic and urged the profession to ensure there is no lasting damage to their education.’

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Litigation Futures, 12th November 2020

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

Section 21A Applications and Section 48 Orders (DP v A Local Authority) – 39 Essex Chambers

‘In this case, Mr Justice Hayden provides helpful practical guidance on the operation of section 48 of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA 2005), as well as confirming the scope of, and the court’s role in, proceedings brought pursuant to MCA 2005, s 21A. He further emphasises the importance of section 21A application being determined speedily, in accordance with Article 5(4) of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) (and accordingly suggests how practically weaknesses in capacity evidence could be addressed).’

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39 Essex Chambers, 15th October 2020

Source: www.39essex.com

Cell Site Evidence: Expert or Not? – St Philips Barristers

Posted November 10th, 2020 in conspiracy, drug trafficking, evidence, expert witnesses, news, telecommunications by sally

‘In R v Andrew Turner [2020] EWCA Crim 1241 the Court of Appeal considered the issue of when a professional witness crosses the line and gives expert evidence, in the context of mobile telephone analysis. The appeal concerned a conspiracy to supply class A drugs, the prosecution relied on mobile telephone and surveillance evidence. The appellant was said to be a driving force behind the conspiracy and that various incriminating mobile telephone numbers could be attributed to him.’

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St Philips Barristers, 5th November 2020

Source: st-philips.com

Part 1: Expert evidence – Additional expert evidence following a Joint Report. – Parklane Plowden Chambers

Posted October 27th, 2020 in evidence, expert witnesses, news, noise, personal injuries by sally

‘The recent case of Hinson v Hare [2020] EWHC 2386 QB provides further clarification on the circumstances in which a court may allow one party permission to rely on a further expert report, when the conclusions reached by the single joint expert are not to their liking. Whilst the specific claim was for noise induced hearing loss (NIHL) the principles expounded can be applied generally.’

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Parklane Plowden Chambers, 2nd October 2020

Source: www.parklaneplowden.co.uk

Defence QC’s accusation against prosecutor was not misconduct – Legal Futures

‘A QC who accused prosecution counsel of bad faith without reasonable grounds was in breach of Bar Standards Board rules but not to the level of professional misconduct, a tribunal has ruled.’

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Legal Futures, 25th September 2020

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

Judge refuses to let claimant abandon “unfavourable” joint expert – Litigation Futures

Posted September 15th, 2020 in appeals, expert witnesses, news, noise, personal injuries, reports by tracey

‘A High Court judge has upheld a decision not to allow a claimant in a noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) case to rely on a different expert because a joint expert produced an unfavourable report.’

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Litigation Futures, 15th September

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

Passports: Foreign law must be proved by expert evidence – EIN Blog

‘Hussein and Another (Status of passports: foreign law) [2020] UKUT 250 (IAC): CMG Ockelton VP has explained that (i) a person who holds a genuine passport, apparently issued to him, and not falsified or altered, has to be regarded as a national of the State that issued the passport, (ii) the burden of proving the contrary lies on the claimant in an asylum case, and (iii) foreign law (including nationality law) is a matter of evidence, to be proved by expert evidence directed specifically to the point in issue. The appellant Mr Hussein, who had permission to appeal, and the applicant Mr Abdulrasool, who was seeking permission to appeal, were father and son who made asylum claims, which were refused. The applicant, who was born in 2000, additionally claimed that he was so dependent on his parents that it would be disproportionate to remove him from the UK. Mr Hussein’s wife and two minor children were included in the appellant’s claim as his dependents. Both men gave their oral evidence in a hearing before FTTJ McAll in January 2020 as did Mr Hussein’s brother. The SSHD was not present and FTTJ McAll considered Mr Hussein’s claimed history in detail. He decided that he was untruthful and concluded that he had fabricated important parts of his account supporting his asylum claim. He decided that Mr Hussein was a national of Tanzania and could be returned there. He disbelieved the asylum claim and concluded that there was no good article 8 reason why he should not leave the UK and return to his country of nationality. Both appeals were dismissed.’

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EIN Blog, 7th September 2020

Source: www.ein.org.uk

Judges issues guidance to experts on remote evidence – Litigation Futures

Posted September 3rd, 2020 in evidence, expert witnesses, news, remote hearings by sally

‘A panel of top judges has issued guidance for expert witnesses on giving evidence remotely, which warns that “processing information through online contact is hard”.’

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Litigation Futures, 3rd September 2020

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

Lyum Roy Campbell (a protected party by his father & litigation friend Donald Campbell) v Advantage Insurance Company Ltd [2020] EWHC 2210 (QB) – Parklane Plowden Chambers

‘In this case the court considered the issues of capacity, consent and contributory negligence following a road traffic accident wherein the Claimant, Lyum Roy Campbell, suffered very severe injuries, having allowed himself to be driven by a friend who was intoxicated.’

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Parklane Plowden Chambers, 21st August 2020

Source: www.parklaneplowden.co.uk

Rapper Ceon Broughton wins appeal against manslaughter conviction following festival death of Louella Fletcher-Michie – Garden Court Chambers

‘Ceon Broughton, a rapper jailed over the death of his partner Louella Fletcher-Michie from a drug overdose at Bestival has won his appeal against his manslaughter conviction. Broughton’s conviction in 2019 and seven-year prison sentence for manslaughter was quashed on 18 August 2020 by the Court of Appeal. The appeal was heard before The Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales Lord Burnett, Mr Justice Sweeney and Mr Justice Murray.’

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Garden Court Chambers, 18th August 2020

Source: www.gardencourtchambers.co.uk

Courts cannot critique “uncontroverted” expert reports – Litigation Futures

‘It is not the role of the courts to subject “uncontroverted” expert reports to “the same kind of analysis and critique as if it was evaluating a controverted or contested report”, the High Court has ruled.’

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Litigation Futures, 25th August 2020

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

Court overturns man’s conviction for girlfriend’s Bestival drug death – The Guardian

‘The rapper Ceon Broughton has had his conviction for the manslaughter of his girlfriend overturned by the court of appeal.’

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The Guardian, 18th August 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Judge rails at lawyers’ ‘thoroughly disorganised’ case presentation – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted July 23rd, 2020 in case management, delay, expert witnesses, family courts, news by sally

‘A High Court judge has urged parties not to expect to be given sympathy in future if they continue to flout procedural rules and file evidence late.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 21st July 2020

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Covid-19 will have “major impact” on £700m medico-legal market – Litigation Futures

‘The medico-legal and insurance services (MLIS) market had an estimated turnover of £700m last year but the coronavirus will have a “major impact”, a report has warned.’

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Litigation Futures, 16th July 2020

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

Costs and the expert – No. 5 Chambers

Posted July 10th, 2020 in chambers articles, children, costs, expert witnesses, families, news by sally

‘Dewinder Birk of No5’s Family Group has set out two cases dealing with two different aspects of experts’ costs in private children cases, but both of which highlight the robustness of the higher courts in exercising discretion in relation to costs when dealing with such matters.’

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No. 5 Chambers, 1st July 2020

Source: www.no5.com

Dunn v FCO — the opening skirmishes – UK Human Rights Blog

‘In R (Dunn) v The Foreign Secretary and the Chief Constable of Northamptonshire [2020] EWHC 1620 (Admin) the Divisional Court dismissed two applications made in anticipation of the forthcoming rolled up judicial review arising out of the death of Harry Dunn.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 6th July 2020

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com