Ep147: Vicarious Trauma in the Legal Profession – Law Pod UK

Posted July 20th, 2021 in legal profession, mental health, news, podcasts by sally

‘In Episode 147 Emma-Louise Fenelon speaks to Rachel Francis and Joanna Fleck about their book Vicarious Trauma in the Legal Profession.’

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Law Pod UK, 19th July 2021

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Ep 146: 5 Key Medical Law Updates – Law Pod UK

Posted July 1st, 2021 in chambers articles, consumer credit, medical treatment, news, podcasts by sally

‘Emma-Louise Fenelon speaks to Richard Mumford and Rajkiran Barhey about 5 key developments in medical law.’

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Law Pod UK, 30th June 2021

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Ep 143: Henry VIII Powers undermining parliamentary supremacy – Law Pod UK

‘In this episode, Rosalind English discusses with Sarabjit Singh and Isabel McArdle of 1 Crown Office Row a number of laws containing “Henry VIII” powers which allow ministers to avoid full parliamentary debate.’

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Law Pod UK, 4th May 2021

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Ep 142: Vaccine Hesitancy and the Court of Protection: Who Decides? – Law Pod UK

Posted April 28th, 2021 in coronavirus, Court of Protection, mental health, news, podcasts, vaccination by sally

‘What happens, if someone lacks capacity under the Mental Capacity Act, and their family for whatever reason objects to the Covid vaccine? Amelia Walker discusses three recent cases with Rosalind English.’

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Law Pod UK, 27th April 2021

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Ep 141: A hundred days since Brexit – Law Pod UK

Posted April 20th, 2021 in brexit, international trade, news, podcasts by sally

‘In the latest episode of 2903cb, Professor Catherine Barnard of the University of Cambridge casts her mind back over the weeks and months since we left the EU. What is her verdict?’

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Law Pod UK, 19th April 2021

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Ep 140: Harriet Wistrich on Criminal Justice for Women – Law Pod UK

Posted April 13th, 2021 in criminal justice, news, podcasts, women by sally

‘Following International Women’s Day and Women’s History Month, Emma-Louise Fenelon spoke to Harriet Wistrich, founder of the Centre for Women’s Justice about the many ways in which the UK criminal justice system is failing women.’

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Law Pod UK, 12th April 2021

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Ep 139: Courts tussle with Uber, Ola and the Gig Economy – Law Pod UK

Posted April 8th, 2021 in holiday pay, minimum wage, news, podcasts, self-employment, taxis by sally

‘Alasdair Henderson of 1 Crown Office Row joins Rosalind English to discuss the recent ruling by the UK Supreme Court that drivers whose work is arranged through Uber’s smartphone app work for Uber under workers’ contracts and so qualify for the protections afforded by employment law, such as minimum wage and paid holiday leave.’

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Law Pod UK, 7th April 2021

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Ep 138: Mediation with Marina Wheeler QC – Law Pod UK

Posted March 18th, 2021 in barristers, dispute resolution, news, podcasts by sally

‘In Episode 138 Emma-Louise Fenelon speaks to Marina Wheeler QC about the burgeoning field of mediation, and outlines a number of useful tips for practitioners drawing from her own experience as a mediator.’

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Law Pod UK, 17th March 2021

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Ep 137: The Law of Artificial Intelligence – Law Pod UK

‘In the latest episode of Law Pod UK Rosalind English talks to Matt Hervey, co-editor with Matthew Lavy of a new practitioner’s text book on Artificial Intelligence. Matt is Head of Artificial Intelligence at Gowling WLG., and advises on all aspects of AI and Intellectual Property, particularly in relation to the life sciences, automotive, aviation, financial and retail sectors. Our discussion ranges across many areas covered by the book, including negligence, liability for physical and economic harm, AI and professional liability, and more on AI and intellectual property, a fascinating subject which Matt touches on in this episode.’

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Law Pod UK, 1st March 2021

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Today in Focus Podcast: Freshwater – The Guardian

Posted February 25th, 2021 in appeals, drug offences, news, podcasts by sally

‘Today [23 February], the Freshwater Five case is in front of the court of appeal after the disclosure of new evidence that the defence says points to the men’s conviction being unsafe. Why has it taken a decade to get to this point?’

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The Guardian, 23rd February 2021

Source: www.theguardian.com

Ep 136: Essential Inquest Law Updates – Law Pod UK

Posted February 18th, 2021 in inquests, legal profession, news, podcasts by sally

‘In Episode 136, Emma-Louise Fenelon speaks to Rachel Marcus and Jim Duffy about the developments inquest law practitioners will need to know about.’

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Law Pod UK, 17th February 2021

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How the Queen lobbied for changes in the law to hide her wealth – The Guardian

Posted February 10th, 2021 in bills, constitutional law, news, parliament, podcasts, royal family by sally

‘Government memos discovered in the National Archives reveal that the Queen lobbied ministers to alter proposed legislation. The Guardian’s David Pegg follows the trail and explains its implications for a monarchy which is supposed to stay out of politics.’

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The Guardian, 10th February 2021

Source: www.theguardian.com

Ep 134: The Most Significant Cases Of 2020 – Law Pod UK

Posted January 12th, 2021 in news, podcasts by sally

‘In Episode 134, Emma-Louise Fenelon speaks to Jon Metzer and Michael Spencer about the most significant cases of a most bewildering year.’

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Law Pod UK, 11th January 2021

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Ep 133: Is our Brexit trade deal with the EU a “Canada minus”? – Law Pod UK

Posted January 6th, 2021 in brexit, EC law, news, podcasts by sally

‘The UK parliament has now passed Boris Johnson’s trade and cooperation agreement with the European Union. Professor Barnard considers it a thin deal – as many predicted – but it has certainly delivered on sovereignty. There is no mention in the text of the European Court of Justice or EU Law. Hear more about the extent to which Britain has “taken back control” in this concise summary.’

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Law Pod UK, 5th January 2021

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Ashbolt v HMRC [2020] STC 1813 – CrimeCast.Law

Posted December 3rd, 2020 in HM Revenue & Customs, income tax, loans, news, podcasts, search & seizure, tax avoidance by tracey

‘The case arose from the response of certain taxpayers and their professional advisers to the Treasury’s introduction of the so called ‘loan charge’ under the Finance Act (No 2) 2017, which was intended to enable HM Revenue and Customs to put an end to what had become a widespread practice of avoiding income tax by characterising payments as loans rather than income. HMRC commenced a criminal investigation into the conduct of a number of subscribers to a particular tax avoidance scheme and, in the course of that investigation, they obtained and executed search warrants relating to both residential and business premises. The question arose whether the first set of access conditions in paragraph 2 to Scheduled 1 of PACE, and whether the further condition in paragraph 14(d) of that schedule had been satisfied. It prompted the Divisional Court to issue a stern warning about the need for scrupulous care in presenting such an application and the court also gave guidance on how, in practical terms, the judge to whom the application is made should be assisted in focusing on the key issues which he or she needs to resolve …’

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CrimeCast.Law, 30th November 2020

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R (RD) v Justice Secretary [2020] EWCA Civ 1346 – CrimeCast.Law

‘This was the second of a pair of recent cases which suggest that police officers and those who aspire to be police officers are held to a higher standard than the general public whom the police are sworn to protect. I discussed yesterday R v Luckett (Michael David) [2020] EWCA Crim 565, which illustrated the approach taken by the Criminal Division of the Court of Appeal to the sentencing of offences of misconduct in a public office by serving police officers. The case of R (RD) v Justice Secretary addresses the rigorous disclosure requirements imposed on those who apply to become police constables or police cadets. It prompted the Civil Division of the Court of Appeal to consider the application of Article 8(2) of the European Convention on Human Rights to candidates for the police service – specifically whether the current regime for the rehabilitation of offenders and for the disclosure of convictions, cautions and reprimands is in accordance with law and necessary in a democratic society …’

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CrimeCast.Law, 30th November 2020

Source: crimecast.law

131: Deputyship Orders in the Court of Protection – Amelia Walker – Law Pod UK

Posted December 1st, 2020 in costs, Court of Protection, news, podcasts, third parties by sally

‘Earlier this year Hilder J considered the question of whether a deputy can recover their costs from the protected person’s assets when they have instructed a legal firm with which they are associated. Amelia Walker discusses this judgment, which also outlines the limits of a deputy’s authority, with Rosalind English.’

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Law Pod UK, 30th November 2020

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R v Luckett (Michael David) [2020] EWCA Crim 565 – CrimeCast.Law

‘“This was one of a pair of recent cases, which tend to suggest that police officers and those who aspire to be police officers are still held to a higher standard than the public they are sworn to protect. It was a sentencing appeal following a plea of guilty by a former police officer, who had made use of information gathered in the course of investigating a drink driving offence to get in touch with the defendant and subsequently enter into a long-term personal relationship with her. He resigned from the police and pleaded guilty to misconduct in a public office. His appeal against the sentence prompted the Court of Appeal to refer to earlier authorities on sentencing for misconduct in a public office by serving police officers and gave the court an opportunity to emphasise the gravity of the offence, whilst at the same time proving that the quality of mercy is not strained …”’

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CrimeCast.Law, 26th November 2020

Source: crimecast.law

Mirchandani v Lord Chancellor [2020] EWCA Civ 1260 – CrimeCast.Law

‘The case was concerned with a private prosecution for fraud offences, which had ultimately resulted in a £20 million confiscation order and £17 million compensation orders. The private prosecutor’s unsuccessful submissions against a third party in proceedings to enforce the confiscation order had led to the unusual spectacle of the Lord Chancellor intervening and persuading a High Court judge to reverse her decision on a jurisdictional question and set aside the order she had previously made. It prompted the Court of Appeal (Civil Division) to conduct a comprehensive review of the primary and secondary legislation and the authorities on private prosecutions, confiscation, costs and the sometimes blurred lines between criminal and civil proceedings.’

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CrimeCast.Law, 24th November 2020

Source: crimecast.law

Racism within the Windrush compensation scheme – The Guardian

‘The Guardian’s Amelia Gentleman wrote her first story on the Windrush scandal almost three years ago – yet she is still hearing from people facing injustice. Alexandra Ankrah, the most senior black Home Office employee in the team responsible for the Windrush compensation scheme, discusses why she resigned this year, describing the scheme as systemically racist and unfit for purpose while Samantha Cooper describes her frustrations with trying to access financial help.’

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The Guardian, 24th November 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com