The Supreme Court ruling on ending life – No. 5 Chambers

Posted August 7th, 2018 in food, human rights, medical treatment, news, Supreme Court by sally

‘After the Anthony Bland case in 1993, it became the practice to get the courts to decide whether a patient in a persistent vegetative state could be allowed to die. Following a Supreme Court decision on 30 July 2018 in a land mark case called NHS Trust v Y [2018] UKSC 46, the law in future will allow doctors and families to make the decision to allow a patient to die to withdraw sustenance where they all agree to it, without needing to go to a court.’

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No. 5 Chambers, 2nd August 2018

Source: www.no5.com

A Marriage Between The Human Rights Act and Medical Negligence?….The Engagement is Definitely Off! – Park Square Barristers

Posted August 6th, 2018 in hospitals, human rights, inquests, medical treatment, negligence, news by sally

‘Lorraine Harris reviews the case of Parkinson which now clarifies the extremely limited use of Article 2 in cases of death following medical treatment, as well as the difficulty of challenging the decision making of a Coroner. Analysis at the close of the article reveals the salient points of the case.’

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Park Square Barristers, 10th July 2018

Source: www.parksquarebarristers.co.uk

Supreme Court considers when court approval is needed to end life-sustaining treatment – Family Law

Posted August 6th, 2018 in food, human rights, medical treatment, news, Supreme Court by sally

‘Alex Ruck Keene, barrister at 39 Essex Chambers, examines the Supreme Court’s confirmation in An NHS Trust and others v Y (by his litigation friend, the Official Solicitor) [2018] UKSC 46, [2018] All ER (D) 167 (Jul) that it was not mandatory to seek court approval for withdrawal of clinically assisted nutrition and hydration (CANH) from a patient suffering from a prolonged disorder of consciousness (PDOC) where the patient’s clinical team and family agreed that continued treatment was not in his best interests.’

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Family Law, 3rd August 2018

Source: www.familylaw.co.uk

No need for court order for withdrawal of nutrition in case of PVS patients – Supreme Court – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted August 3rd, 2018 in food, human rights, medical treatment, news, Supreme Court by tracey

‘NHS Trust v Y (by his litigation friend, the Official Solicitor) and Others, Supreme Court 30 July 2018. The question for the Court was a simple but important one: whether the permission of a court was always required by law before doctors could withdraw feeding from a person in a persistent vegetative state.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 2nd August 2018

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

UK judges will no longer have to rule in vegetative state decisions – The Guardian

Posted July 30th, 2018 in food, human rights, medical treatment, news, Supreme Court by sally

‘Judges will no longer need to be consulted when doctors and relatives of patients in a vegetative state agree that life-supporting treatment should be ended.’

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The Guardian, 30th July 2018

Source: www.theguardian.com

Supreme Court to rule on vegetative state case – BBC News

‘The Supreme Court is due to rule on whether it should be easier to withdraw food and liquid to allow people in long-term vegetative states to die.’

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BBC News, 30th July 2018

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

A Judge Has Ruled A Mother Shouldn’t Know About Her Child’s Cancer – Rights Info

Posted July 26th, 2018 in cancer, children, health, medical treatment, news, parental rights, privacy by sally

‘A mother will not be told her teenage child is being treated for a rare form of cancer, in an important ruling about privacy by a High Court judge.’

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Rights Info, 25th July 2018

Source: rightsinfo.org

Vicarious liability: Banking on bright lines – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted July 24th, 2018 in banking, medical treatment, news, sexual offences, vicarious liability by tracey

‘A bank requires its would-be recruits and some of its existing employees to undergo a medical. It sends them to the home of one particular, self-employed doctor. There, they undergo a medical examination, unaccompanied by anyone from the bank. The doctor completes the bank’s proforma examination form, headed with its logo and entitled “Barclays Confidential Medical Report”. The form is detailed. It includes sections on chest “Inspiration” and “Expiration”, “Abdomen (including Genito-Urinary System)”. It contains a section for “Female applicants only”, asking whether they have suffered from menstrual or pregnancy disorders. The doctor – Gordon Bates – subsequently dies. A large group of women sue the bank alleging that it is liable for sexual assaults carried out by the doctor during the examinations. The question for the Court of Appeal in Barclays Bank plc v Various Claimants [2018] EWCA Civ 1670 was whether the bank could be vicariously liable.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 24th July 218

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Home Office launches review into medical use of cannabis – Home Office

Posted June 21st, 2018 in drug offences, licensing, medical treatment, medicines, press releases by tracey

‘The Home Secretary today announced a review into the scheduling of cannabis for medicinal purposes.’

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Home Office, 19th June 2018

Source: www.gov.uk/home-office

High Court backs NHS decision to stop funding homeopathy – Daily Telegraph

Posted June 6th, 2018 in budgets, consultations, health, medical treatment, news, reports by tracey

‘A decision to stop NHS funding for homeopathy has been upheld by a High Court judge. The British Homeopathic Association (BHA) brought a legal challenge against NHS England’s decision, made in November last year, to stop paying the £92,000 annual cost of homeopathic remedies. But, following a four-day hearing in London in May, Mr Justice Supperstone dismissed the BHA’s case in a ruling on Tuesday.’

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Daily Telegraph, 5th June 2018

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Baby was decapitated by doctor’s actions, tribunal rules – Daily Telegraph

Posted June 5th, 2018 in birth, disciplinary procedures, doctors, medical treatment, news, tribunals by tracey

‘A gynaecologist who caused an unborn baby to be accidentally decapitated in her mother’s womb has been found guilty of medical misconduct.’

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Daily Telegraph, 4th June 2018

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Jail for man who “grossly exaggerated” impact of negligent treatment in NHS first – Litigation Futures

Posted June 4th, 2018 in damages, medical treatment, negligence, news, personal injuries, sentencing by sally

‘A man who “grossly exaggerated” the effects of negligent hospital treatment – claiming £837,000 when he had been offered £30,000 – was last week sentenced to three months in jail in the first contempt of court case brought by an NHS foundation trust.’

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Litigation Futures, 4th June 2018

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

“Victory for product innovation” after High Court rejects group hip replacement implant claim – Litigation Futures

Posted May 23rd, 2018 in class actions, consumer protection, health, medical treatment, news by tracey

‘The High Court yesterday rejected a group action claiming that a “metal on metal” (MoM) hip replacement implant was defective under the Consumer Protection Act 1987.’

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Litigation Futures, 22nd May 2018

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

Patients lose hip replacement court case – BBC News

Posted May 22nd, 2018 in compensation, consumer protection, health, medical treatment, news by sally

‘Hundreds of patients have lost the first round of a legal battle for compensation at the High Court over allegedly “defective” hip implants.’

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BBC News, 21st May 2018

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Woman who asked court to allow disabled daughter to die changes mind – BBC News

Posted May 21st, 2018 in care orders, children, consent, disabled persons, medical treatment, news by sally

‘A woman who thought that her severely disabled 11-year-old daughter should be allowed to die has told a family court judge that she has changed her mind.’

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BBC News, 20th May 2018

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Alfie Evans can return home, judge rules – but he can’t go to Italy for treatment – Daily Telegraph

Posted April 25th, 2018 in children, citizenship, consent, medical treatment, news by sally

‘Terminally ill Alfie Evans may be allowed home, a judge has ruled but he will not be allowed to go to Rome for further treatment.’

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Daily Telegraph, 24th April 2018

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Parents of Alfie Evans apply to take son’s case back to supreme court – The Guardian

Posted April 18th, 2018 in appeals, children, consent, medical treatment, news, Supreme Court by sally

‘The parents of a 23-month-old boy at the centre of a life-support treatment battle have applied to the supreme court to appeal against a ruling that treatment should be removed from the child.’

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The Guardian, 17th April 2018

Source: www.theguardian.com

Alfie Evans case: Court rules against parents again – BBC News

Posted April 17th, 2018 in appeals, children, detention, medical treatment, news, parental rights by tracey

‘The parents of terminally ill toddler Alfie Evans have lost their latest legal battle. Tom Evans and Kate James asked Court of Appeal judges to rule that the 23-month-old should be allowed to receive treatment in Italy.’

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BBC News, 16th April 2018

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Alfie Evans: Toddler’s parents launch new legal challenge – BBC News

Posted April 13th, 2018 in appeals, children, consent, medical treatment, news by tracey

‘The parents of a terminally ill toddler who has been at the centre of a life-support treatment battle are set to mount another legal challenge. Tom Evans and Kate James are preparing to ask Court of Appeal judges to allow 23-month-old Alfie Evans to continue to receive treatment.’

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BBC News, 13th April

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

High court judge backs end-of-life care plan for toddler on life support – The Guardian

‘A high court judge has endorsed an end-of-life care plan for a 23-month-old boy who has been at the centre of a life-support treatment legal battle.’

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The Guardian, 11th April 2018

Source: www.theguardian.com