“Poorly drafted” CFA that named wrong defendant still valid, Court of Appeal rules – Litigation Futures

Posted June 20th, 2018 in contracts, drafting, fees, interpretation, news by sally

‘A conditional fee agreement (CFA) that named the wrong defendant was still valid when read in the wider context of the claim, the Court of Appeal has ruled.’

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Litigation Futures, 20th June 2018

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

Court of Appeal upholds ‘reasonable’ widely-drafted exclusion clause – OUT-LAW.com

Posted June 20th, 2018 in contracts, exclusion clauses, fire, news, unfair contract terms by sally

‘A widely-drafted exclusion clause in the standard terms of a fire protection system provider was not unreasonable, and therefore should be upheld, the Court of Appeal has confirmed.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 19th June 2018

Source: www.out-law.com

Opportunistic Conduct and Good Faith – the line that joint venturers may not cross – Hardwicke Chambers

Posted June 19th, 2018 in agreements, contracts, joint ventures, news by sally

‘A genial sheikh and an overly optimistic hotelier enter a joint venture to develop a chain of luxury hotels and an online travel business. What could possibly go wrong? Other than a global financial meltdown, the Greek debt crisis, a volcano in Iceland, threats of physical violence, blackmail, accusations of swindling, furtive double-dealing, rampant opportunism and – it turns out – breach of a contractual duty of good faith.’

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Hardwicke Chambers, 16th May 2018

Source: www.hardwicke.co.uk

Appeal court judge’s “dismay” over £2m costs bill for flight claims – Litigation Futures

Posted June 8th, 2018 in airlines, contracts, costs, news by sally

‘An appeal court judge has expressed his “dismay” after estimating that legal costs “not far shy of £2m” had been spent in a case involving over 800 claims for flight-related compensation each worth only a few hundred pounds.’

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Litigation Futures, 5th June 2018

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

‘The main driver was costs’ – judges make no order in £2m case – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted June 4th, 2018 in airlines, contracts, costs, EC law, news by sally

‘The Court of Appeal has criticised both parties in a flight compensation group claim for creating a situation where costs finished up ‘out of all proportion’ to the amount sought.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 1st June 2018

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Case Comment: Rock Advertising Limited v MWB Business Exchange Centres Limited [2018] UKSC 24 – Supreme Court Blog

Posted May 23rd, 2018 in agreements, appeals, contracts, news, Supreme Court by tracey

‘Mitchell Abbott, trainee in the dispute resolution team at CMS, offers comment on the decision of the Supreme Court in the matter of Rock Advertising Limited v MWB Business Exchange Centres Limited [2018] UKSC 24.’

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Supreme Court Blog, 18th May 2018

Source: ukscblog.com

Retention proposals take shape: analysing the text of the Aldous Bill – Practical Law: Construction Blog

Posted May 16th, 2018 in bills, construction industry, contracts, deposits, news by tracey

‘For many years, parts of the construction sector have pushed for improvement of the market’s treatment of retention monies. Post-Carillion and its devastating impact on suppliers, however, matters may have reached a tipping point. On 9 January 2018 – a few days before the construction giant’s collapse – the backbencher Peter Aldous introduced the Construction (Retention Deposit Schemes) Bill under Parliament’s Ten Minute Rule. Given the importance of government support in mustering a majority in the House of Commons, relatively few Private Members’ Bills (PMB) become law. To this end, proponents of the “Aldous Bill”, not least the Waveney MP himself, have been busily promoting its merits within the industry and rallying support among politicians ahead of it being debated by MPs at the second reading.’

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Practical Law: Construction Blog, 15th May 2018

Source: constructionblog.practicallaw.com

High Court: Defendant must pay credit hire costs even where claimant has contingent liability for them – Litigation Futures

Posted May 16th, 2018 in contracts, insurance, news, road traffic by sally

‘A circuit judge was wrong to deny a claimant recovery of £20,000 in credit hire charges because she had been assured that she would never have to pay any outstanding sums herself, the High Court has ruled.’

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Litigation Futures, 16th May 2018

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

Victory for dog trainer sued for failing to tame terrier as judge rules she’s ‘not dealing with a machine, but a puppy’ – Daily Telegraph

Posted May 11th, 2018 in contracts, dogs, news by sally

‘A dog trainer to the royals has won a High Court battle with a disgruntled customer after a judge ruled she was “not dealing with a machine, but a puppy”.’

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Daily Telegraph, 10th May 2018

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Reject data contracts with solicitor firms, bar told – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted May 2nd, 2018 in barristers, contracts, data protection, law firms, news by tracey

‘Self-employed barristers have been advised not to sign contracts drawn up by law firms attempting to comply with data protection legislation coming into force this month. The contracts, required by Article 28 of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), provide “data controllers” with guarantees that “data processors” working for them will protect the rights of data subjects – in this case, clients.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 2nd May 2018

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Case Comment: Morris-Garner v One Step (Support) Ltd [2018] UKSC 20 – UK Supreme Court Blog

Posted April 27th, 2018 in contracts, damages, economic loss, news, restrictive covenants by tracey

‘PAUL NICHOLLS QC, MATRIX Case Comments: It is often very difficult in cases involving breaches of restrictive covenants and misuse of confidential information to recover damages. It can be hard to prove loss. Employees may adduce evidence to show, for example, that customers would have ceased to deal with the claimant employer as a result of the mere fact of the employee’s departure such that the employee’s breach of a non-solicitation covenant has not caused loss. In cases about misuse of confidential information, the employee may be able to show that information wrongly removed could easily have been obtained from legitimate sources such that no loss flows from the misuse.’

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UK Supreme Court Blog, 24th April 2018

Source: ukscblog.com

An unplanned surprise: Implied planning obligations – Clin v Walter Lilly – Practical Law: Construction Blog

Posted April 13th, 2018 in construction industry, contracts, news, planning by tracey

‘Recently, in the course of reviewing a proposed building contract for an employer, I had cause to consider how responsibility for obtaining planning consents had been addressed. Or rather, whether it had been addressed at all. Jean-François Clin v Walter Lilly & Co Ltd is a forceful reminder to effectively deal with this issue. The Court of Appeal held that, in the absence of an express term to the contrary, a term was implied into the parties’ contract requiring the employer to obtain planning permission for redevelopment of the property and, generally, making the employer responsible for obtaining necessary consents.’

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Practical Law: Construction Blog, 11th April 2018

Source: constructionblog.practicallaw.com

Boxing promoter Warren loses twin challenges to CFAs – Litigation Futures

Posted March 28th, 2018 in contracts, costs, defamation, fees, news, solicitors by tracey

‘Boxing promoter Frank Warren has failed in his effort to avoid paying his solicitors under conditional fee agreements (CFAs) where he did not receive any damages or costs despite winning his case.’

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Litigation Futures, 28th March 2018

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

Court casts doubt on who bears risk of obtaining planning permission – OUT-LAW.com

Posted March 23rd, 2018 in construction industry, contracts, news, planning, time limits by tracey

‘The employer under a standard form construction contract is not under an absolute obligation to obtain planning permission or conservation consent before the works can go ahead, the Court of Appeal has ruled.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 22nd March 2018

Source: www.out-law.com

Oral construction contracts and issues in adjudication enforcement – Practical Law: Construction Blog

Posted March 21st, 2018 in construction industry, contracts, dispute resolution, enforcement, news by tracey

‘Two recent judgments illustrate the difficulties that oral contracts can cause in adjudication enforcement proceedings. The first was Jefford J’s judgment in Hart v Ideal and the second (although actually the first in time) was Fraser J’s judgment in Dacy v IDM (which had also been before Jefford J a couple of years earlier).’

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Practical Law: Construction Blog, 20th march 2018

Source: constructionblog.practicallaw.com

Reminder that adjudicator’s appointment lapses if no decision – Practical Law: Construction Blog

Posted March 15th, 2018 in arbitration, construction industry, contracts, fees, news, remuneration by tracey

‘Some judgments seem destined to be blogged about (at least by me) and Baldwin v J Pickstock Ltd is one such judgment. It’s all about the adjudicator’s decision (or lack of), whether there was an extension of time for reaching that decision and whether the adjudicator had properly resigned and should be paid for the work he did (even though he did not reach a decision). It’s not quite Cubitt Building & Interiors v Fleetglade, but it does demonstrate how adjudicators need to be alive to banana skin tactics, even those coming from the referring party!’

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Practical Law: Construction Blog, 13th March 2018

Source: constructionblog.practicallaw.com

University vows to robustly defend legal action over quality of degree course – Local Government Lawyer

Posted March 14th, 2018 in contracts, misrepresentation, news, universities by sally

‘Anglia Ruskin University has said it will robustly defend legal action brought by a former student over what she has said were misleading claims about the quality of teaching.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 14th March 2018

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Law firm that should have warned property investor clients of “Mafia risk” fails in Supreme Court bid – Legal Futures

‘A law firm with offices in Italy and England has reached the end of the line in challenging a ruling that it was under a duty to warn British and Irish property investors of the risks of investing in a part of Italy associated with organised crime.’

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Legal Futures, 9th March 2018

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

Does Grove v S&T herald the dawn of a new regime for payment notice disputes? – Practical Law: Construction Blog

Posted March 8th, 2018 in arbitration, construction industry, contracts, news, notification, remuneration by tracey

‘Unless you have been hiding under a rock (or have been on holiday somewhere), you can’t have failed to notice that Coulson J has handed down his last substantive TCC judgment. So much has already been written about Grove v S&T and what it means for the construction industry that there’s barely been room for anything else on my Twitter and LinkedIn feeds. There really is nowhere to hide from all the commentary.’

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Practical Law: Construction Blog, 6th March 2018

Source: constructionblog.practicallaw.com

Noisy neighbours must pay banker £100,000 in compensation because their floors had no carpet, judge rules – Daily Telegraph

Posted March 7th, 2018 in compensation, contracts, injunctions, news, noise, nuisance by sally

‘The noisy neighbours of a banker must pay her £100,000 in compensation because their floors had no carpet, a judge has ruled.’

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Daily Telegraph, 5th March 2018

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk