Commercial Court upholds hot works “exclusion” in Contractor’s Liability Policy – Practical Law: Construction Blog

Posted November 27th, 2018 in appeals, Commercial Court, construction industry, contracts, fire, insurance, news by tracey

‘Aspen Insurance UK Ltd & Liberty Mutual Insurance Europe Ltd v Sangster and Annand Ltd is a case that concerns a fire at a Scottish hotel, and liability under a Contractor’s Liability Insurance policy. It was heard by HHJ Waksman QC (as he then was) in the Commercial Court in June and, earlier this week, the Court of Appeal refused permission to appeal.’

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Practical Law: Construction Blog, 23rd November 2018

Source: constructionblog.practicallaw.com

EE and Virgin Media fined £13.3m for overcharging customers – The Guardian

Posted November 16th, 2018 in consumer protection, contracts, fines, internet, news, telecommunications by tracey

‘Virgin Media and EE have been fined a combined £13.3m by the regulator Ofcom for overcharging nearly 500,000 phone and broadband customers who wanted to leave their contracts early.@

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The Guardian, 16th November 2018

Source: www.theguardian.com

North Midland Building v Cyden: apportioning risk for concurrent delay in the UAE – Practical Law: Construction Blog

‘In North Midland Building Ltd v Cyden Homes, the Court of Appeal held that parties to a construction contract are free to apportion risk in the event of concurrent delay.’

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Practical Law: Construction Blog, 7th November 2018

Source: constructionblog.practicallaw.com

GDPR: the ‘controller v processor’ debate in financial services – OUT-LAW.com

Posted November 5th, 2018 in banking, codes of practice, contracts, data protection, EC law, news, third parties by sally

‘Lessons can be learned in the financial services sector from the rush to update contracts to account for the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) taking effect earlier this year.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 2nd November 2018

Source: www.out-law.com

Four Fundamentals of Limitation Periods in Contract and Tort Claims – 4 New Square

Posted November 2nd, 2018 in contracts, limitations, news, personal injuries by sally

‘Four key points for the limitation period for contract and tort claims. Limitation is fiendishly complex – these are some fundamentals for an ‘all-or-nothing’ defence affecting every claim.’

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4 New Square, 25th October 2018

Source: www.4newsquare.com

AI will prompt new contract law, says Supreme Court judge – OUT-LAW.com

‘Contract law will need to be updated, and new civil liability rules considered, to account for the use of artificial intelligence (AI) in financial services, a senior UK judge has said.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 30th October 2018

Source: www.out-law.com

Unmarried couples’ entitlements and cohabitation agreements – Family Law

Posted October 31st, 2018 in children, cohabitation, contracts, financial provision, news by sally

‘The number of cohabitating families has increased by almost 30% in the last decade, which has led to a rise in complex legal disputes after a break-up. It is a common misconception that cohabitants possess the same legal rights and obligations as a married couple or a civil partnership. There is no such thing as a “common law” husband or wife in the eyes of the Court and therefore it is important that cohabitants are aware of their rights, according to Danielle Bentley, a solicitor at Herrington & Carmichael LLP.’

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Family Law, 29th October 2018

Source: www.familylaw.co.uk

Saved by silence: Letters of intent and Arcadis v Amec – Practical Law: Construction Blog

Posted October 26th, 2018 in construction industry, contracts, news by tracey

‘Employers under construction contracts often find themselves under time pressure to get started with construction of their projects prior to concluding negotiations with their preferred contractor and before the building contract is entered into. In such a scenario, employers commonly choose to rely on a letter of intent. This should give the contractor comfort to proceed with certain elements of the construction works, while the parties continue to negotiate the full contract terms. Unfortunately not all “letters of intent” are clearly formulated in advance, and the parties may find themselves proceeding with the works on the basis of a series of exchanges and correspondence, as was the case in Arcadis Consulting (UK) Ltd v AMEC (BSC) Ltd.’

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Practical Law: Construction Blog, 24th October 2018

Source: constructionblog.practicallaw.com

Lord Hodge at East China University of Political Science and Law, Shanghai, China, Speech – Supreme Court

‘Financial Technology: Opportunities and Challenges to Law and Regulation, East China University of Political Science and Law, Shanghai, China.’

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Supreme Court, 26th October 2018

Source: www.supremecourt.uk

Speech by Lord Justice Leggatt, Negotiation in Good Faith: Adapting to Changing Circumstances in Contracts and English Contract Law – Courts and Tribunals Judiciary

Posted October 24th, 2018 in Commercial Court, contracts, damages, enforcement, speeches by tracey

‘Speech by Lord Justice Leggatt, Negotiation in Good Faith: Adapting to Changing Circumstances in Contracts and English Contract Law.’

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Courts and Tribunals Judiciary, 22nd October 2018

Source: www.judiciary.uk

Judge refuses to lift suspension on award of community health services contract – Local Government Lawyer

Posted October 23rd, 2018 in community care, contracting out, contracts, health, hospitals, news by sally

‘A High Court judge has refused to lift the automatic suspension in place following a legal challenge to the proposed award of a contract for adult community health services.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 22nd October 2018

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

‘Common sense prevails’ when work began before contract finalised – OUT-LAW.com

Posted October 23rd, 2018 in appeals, construction industry, contracting out, contracts, limitations, news by sally

‘The Court of Appeal has upheld a limitation of liability clause negotiated between the parties on a defective construction project, when work began before the parties formalised those terms.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 23rd October 2018

Source: www.out-law.com

Duty to care for student mental health has legal implications for universities – OUT-LAW.com

‘Universities have a duty to support students with mental health issues, but there are a series of legal issues that they need to consider which should shape how they do so.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 17th October 2018

Source: www.out-law.com

Ointment for a sting: Arcadis Consulting v AMEC – Practical Law: Construction Blog

Posted October 15th, 2018 in appeals, construction industry, contracting out, contracts, limitations, news by tracey

‘The Court of Appeal has come to the aid of Arcadis Consulting (UK) Ltd by overturning Coulson J’s judgment in ​Arcadis Consulting (UK) Ltd v AMEC (BSC) Ltd – a case described by the judge as one “with something of a sting in its tail”. The sting in question was Coulson J’s finding that a contract between Arcadis and AMEC did not incorporate any term that limited Arcadis’ liability. As a result, Arcadis faced a potential loss of £40 million.’

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Practical Law: Construction Blog, 12th October 2018

Source: constructionblog.practicallaw.com

Adjudicator’s chicken and egg jurisdictional dilemma – Practical Law: Construction Blog

Posted October 5th, 2018 in building law, contracts, dispute resolution, jurisdiction, news by tracey

‘The last time I looked at the dispute between Rawlings Consulting (UK) Ltd and Maelor Foods Ltd, I was talking about HHJ Eyre’s judgment and how the arbitration clause in a JCT standard building contract can “trump” a Part 8 application for declaratory relief. This time, I’m looking at HHJ Stephen Davies’ judgment and Maelor’s (the employer) jurisdictional challenge, based on the argument that the dispute which Rawlings (the contractor) referred to adjudication arose under more than one contract.’

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Practical Law: Construction Blog, 2nd October 2018

Source: constructionblog.practicallaw.com

Court delivers warning blow to parties seeking to rely on force majeure clauses – OUT-LAW.com

Posted September 25th, 2018 in contracts, news, ships by sally

‘The English High Court has ruled that a charter company was in breach of contract when it failed to provide cargoes to a ship owner – but that the contract’s ‘force majeure’ clause means it escapes paying damages.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 24th September 2018

Source: www.out-law.com

Arbitration clause “trumps” Part 8 application to overturn adjudicator’s decision – Practical Law: Construction Blog

Posted September 20th, 2018 in arbitration, construction industry, contracts, costs, news, stay of proceedings by tracey

‘When I was a kid, Top Trumps were all the rage. I know from my own boys that they still are. Back then, it was all about whether you had the fastest car or the most popular footballer (even Star Wars characters featured, but how did you decide if Hans Solo was better than Princess Leia?). Now, just about every topic is covered by a set of cards.
I mention this because a recent TCC judgment demonstrates that the arbitration clause in the JCT standard building contract can “trump” a Part 8 application for declaratory relief, with the court granting a stay of those Part 8 proceedings.’

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Practical Law: Construction Blog, 18th September 2018

Source: constructionblog.practicallaw.com

Risky business: Offshore drilling and using force majeure as an exit route – Practical Law: Construction Blog

Posted September 12th, 2018 in construction industry, contracts, news by tracey

‘A contract can be a long term commitment. Over the course of a contract, things happen. Circumstances change. Force majeure clauses generally allow parties to allocate contractual risk, by limiting liability, excusing performance or providing for termination, if unusual or unfortunate circumstances arise. However, the recent case of Seadrill v Tullow reminds us that it is not all that easy for a party to seek to avoid obligations it has freely undertaken.’

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Practical Law: Construction Blog, 10th September 2018

Source: constructionblog.practicallaw.com

Discontinuance, costs, and multiple Defendants: BAE Systems Pension Funds Trustees Ltd v Bowmer & Kirkland Ltd [2018] EWHC 1222 (TCC) – Zenith PI

Posted September 12th, 2018 in construction industry, contracts, costs, news, warehousing by tracey

‘This case is a reminder, if any were needed, of the difficulties facing Claimants in deciding whether or not to pursue multiple Defendants.’

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Zenith PI, 10th September 2018

Source: zenithpi.wordpress.com

Vinci v Beumer: the case that keeps on giving (and giving) – Practical Law: Construction Blog

Posted September 6th, 2018 in appeals, arbitration, construction industry, contracting out, contracts, news by tracey

‘It is the start of autumn and July seems a long way off now, with the summer holidays all over and the World Cup just a distant memory. Consequently, it may be easy to have forgotten about Vinci Construction UK Ltd v Beumer Group UK Ltd, which had its latest outing in the TCC at the end of that month. This time it was Jonathan Acton Davis QC (sitting as a deputy High Court judge) who enforced the adjudicator’s decision and dismissed Beumer’s (the sub-contractor) arguments that the adjudicator was in breach of the rules of natural justice.’

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Practical Law: Construction Blog, 4th September 2018

Source: constructionblog.practicallaw.com