The EU Withdrawal Bill in the Commons: Parliament surrendering control? – Oxford Human Rights Hub

Posted June 19th, 2018 in amendments, bills, constitutional reform, EC law, news, parliament by sally

‘Last week, the EU Withdrawal Bill returned to the Commons, so MPs could scrutinise and vote on amendments made to it by the House of Lords. The Bill survived its passage in the House of Commons last year relatively intact, with only one amendment carried against the Government. Things were different, however, in the Lords, where the Government was defeated on 15 substantial amendments.’

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Oxford Human Rights Hub, 18th June 2018

Source: ohrh.law.ox.ac.uk

Francis Young: Parliament and Taking Back Control: A Precedent from the Maastricht Debates – UK Constitutional Law Association

Posted June 18th, 2018 in bills, constitutional law, EC law, news, parliament, referendums, treaties by sally

‘This post considers whether it is a convention of the British constitution that Parliament cannot direct the executive in the making of treaties. The context, of course, is the current tussle over whether the European Union (Withdrawal) Bill should be amended to allow the House of Commons a “meaningful vote” on the outcome of the current negotiations with the EU.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 15th June 2018

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

Justice Minister Phillip Lee Resigns Over Brexit Saying We Need To Be On ‘The Right Side of History’ – Rights Info

Posted June 13th, 2018 in EC law, human rights, news, political parties by sally

‘Justice minister Phillip Lee has resigned from his position, during a keynote speech about the importance of human rights.’

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Rights Info, 12th June 2018

Source: rightsinfo.org

Jack Simson Caird: Parliament’s Right to a ‘Meaningful Vote’: Amendments to the EU (Withdrawal) Bill – UK Constitutional Law Association

Posted June 12th, 2018 in amendments, bills, constitutional reform, EC law, news, parliament, treaties by sally

‘On Tuesday 12 June 2018, the Government will ask the House of Commons to reject the Lords’ meaningful vote amendment to the EU (Withdrawal) Bill (Lords Amendment 19). If the amendment is rejected, the Government will ask the Commons to accept its own alternative version, known as an ‘amendment in lieu’. If either amendment is enacted, and the Commons uses its veto to reject the Withdrawal Agreement, this would be a constitutionally unprecedented situation. This post looks at the Government’s ‘amendment in lieu’, and the features that distinguish it from the Lords’ amendment.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 11th June 2018

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

GDPR and those emails – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted June 4th, 2018 in data protection, EC law, electronic mail, news by sally

‘The new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) came into force on Friday 25 May 2018. Ironically, a law designed to protect peoples’ privacy in a digital age has unleashed a torrent of spam emails.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 4th June 2018

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

‘The main driver was costs’ – judges make no order in £2m case – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted June 4th, 2018 in airlines, contracts, costs, EC law, news by sally

‘The Court of Appeal has criticised both parties in a flight compensation group claim for creating a situation where costs finished up ‘out of all proportion’ to the amount sought.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 1st June 2018

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

What is GDPR and how will it affect you? – The Guardian

Posted May 22nd, 2018 in data protection, EC law, news, privacy, regulations by sally

‘You could be forgiven for thinking that Europe’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is a law created to fill your inbox with identikit warnings from every company you have ever interacted with online that “the privacy policy has changed” and pleas to “just click here so we can stay in touch”.’

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The Guardian, 21st May 2018

Source: www.theguardian.com

Most GDPR emails unnecessary and some illegal, say experts – The Guardian

Posted May 22nd, 2018 in consent, data protection, EC law, electronic mail, news, regulations by sally

‘The vast majority of emails flooding inboxes across Europe from companies asking for consent to keep recipients on their mailing list are unnecessary and some may be illegal, privacy experts have said, as new rules over data privacy come into force at the end of this week.’

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The Guardian, 21st May 2018

Source: www.theguardian.com

Brexit implications for family law analysed in panel discussion at European Parliament – Family Law

Posted May 21st, 2018 in divorce, EC law, families, family courts, foreign jurisdictions, news by sally

‘Four family law experts took part in a panel discussion at the European Parliament yesterday to discuss the implications for family law of the UK leaving the EU.’

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Family Law, 18th May 2018

Source: www.familylaw.co.uk

New UK trade secrets laws imminent – OUT-LAW.com

Posted May 17th, 2018 in consultations, EC law, intellectual property, legislation, news, regulations by tracey

‘New trade secrets laws are scheduled to be published by the UK government before the end of this month.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 16th May 2018

Source: www.out-law.com

GDPR to fuel group actions over data breaches, barristers predict – Litigation Futures

Posted May 17th, 2018 in class actions, data protection, EC law, news by tracey

‘The introduction of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) will only increase the appetite for group or representative action for data breaches, a QC has claimed.’

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Litigation Futures, 16th May 2018

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

UK agency warns Brexit could lead to rise in organised crime – OUT-LAW.com

Posted May 15th, 2018 in crime, EC law, money laundering, news, reports, treaties by sally

‘The UK body charged with fighting serious and organised crime has warned that the country’s impending withdrawal from the EU could lead to a rise in money laundering, bribery and other corporate offences.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 14th May 2018

Source: www.out-law.com

EU rough sleepers win damages for illegal deportations – BBC News

Posted May 14th, 2018 in compensation, deportation, EC law, homelessness, news by sally

‘The government is to pay hundreds of thousands of pounds to European rough sleepers who were illegally detained and deported.’

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BBC News, 13th May 2018

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Breaking up is hard to do: the fate of family law in post-Brexit Britain – Family Law

‘It is now over nine months since the European Union (Withdrawal) Bill was introduced into the House of Commons in July of last year. The Government’s stated aim was to ensure the UK exits the EU with maximum ‘certainty, continuity and control’. We now know that we will be leaving the EU at 11pm on Friday 29 March 2019. It is still unclear as to how this will happen, although the Government has indicated its wish to maintain a deep and special partnership with the EU. With approximately three million EU citizens living in the UK and around one million British citizens living in other EU member states, the implications of Brexit for European couples separating or divorcing and for their families is wide-reaching and of concern to all family practitioners.’

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Family Law, 10th May 2018

Source: www.familylaw.co.uk

Privacy Rights: How should a court remedy legislative incompatibility with EU law? – UK Human Rights Blog

‘R (The National Council for Civil Liberties (Liberty)) v Secretary of State for the Home Department & Anor [2018] EWHC 975 (Admin) (27 April 2018). In the first phase of Liberty’s landmark challenge to the Investigatory Powers Act 2016 (“IPA”), Singh LJ and Holgate J sitting as a Divisional Court have granted a declaration that in the area of criminal justice, Part 4 of the Investigatory Powers Act 2016 is, in part, incompatible with EU law. Other parts of Liberty’s challenge to the IPA will be considered at a later date.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 8th May 2018

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Unitary patent and Unified Patent Court reforms: state of play May 2018 – OUT-LAW.com

Posted May 2nd, 2018 in courts, EC law, news, patents, treaties by tracey

‘The UK’s recent ratification of the Unified Patent Court (UPC) Agreement marked an important step towards a new system of unitary patent protection becoming operational. The process has been lengthy and complex and is not over yet.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 1st May 2018

Source: www.out-law.com

Both sides claim victory in surveillance law challenge – Law Society’s Gazette

‘A High Court ruling today in the latest crowd-funded challenge to the government’s powers to monitor electronic communications has left both sides claiming victory. Ruling in Liberty v Home Office, Lord Justice Singh and Mr Justice Holgate ordered the government to amend a provision of the Investigatory Powers Act 2016 granting powers to require telecoms operators to store records of communications, including tracking information and web browsing.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 27th April 2018

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Final UK network and information security laws published – OUT-LAW.com

Posted April 27th, 2018 in EC law, fines, internet, news, penalties by tracey

‘UK laws which will implement the EU’s Network and Information Security (NIS) Directive have been finalised and published.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 27th April 2018

Source: www.out-law.com

New Europe law makes it easy to find out what your boss has said about you – The Guardian

‘General Data Protection Regulation holds that anyone in Europe can ask any company for the data it has on them.’

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The Guardian, 24th April 2018

Source: www.theguardian.com

Nestlé’s KitKat dealt blow in trademark battle as EU adviser says it is not distinctive enough – Daily Telegraph

Posted April 20th, 2018 in EC law, food, news, trade marks by sally

‘KitKat faces the loss of EU trade mark protection for its four-fingered chocolate bar, after a senior adviser to the European Court of Justice said the shape was not recognised by customers in enough countries.’

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Daily Telegraph, 19th April 2018

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk