Challenging a Settled Status decision – Richmond Chambers

Posted February 12th, 2020 in appeals, brexit, EC law, immigration, judicial review, news by sally

‘The EU Settled Status Scheme, under Appendix EU to the Immigration Rules, opened to all applicants on 30 March 2019.’

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Richmond Chambers, 5th February 2020

Source: immigrationbarrister.co.uk

Understanding the implementation of the Withdrawal Agreement in domestic law – Brexit Law

Posted February 11th, 2020 in brexit, chambers articles, EC law, news, treaties by sally

‘As explained in a previous post, the entry into force on 31 January 2020 of the UK’s Withdrawal Agreement, following its ratification by both the UK and the EU, would not in and of itself have meant that the Withdrawal Agreement had effect in UK law. Rather, legislation was required to implement it.’

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Brexit Law, 11th February 2020

Source: brexit.law

Brexit and GDPR – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted February 10th, 2020 in brexit, data protection, EC law, fines, news by sally

‘Brexit has finally been ‘done’ but what can we data protection lawyers look forward to? Can we bin the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) along with our red EU passports?’

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Law Society's Gazette, 10th February 2020

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Jurisdiction and the Recognition and Enforcement of Judgments After Brexit – 4 New Square

Posted January 28th, 2020 in brexit, EC law, enforcement, foreign jurisdictions, judgments, jurisdiction, news by sally

‘The European Union (Withdrawal Agreement) Act 2020 gained Royal Assent on 23 January 2020 (“the Withdrawal Agreement Act”).’

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4 New Square, 27th January 2020

Source: www.4newsquare.com

New Act – legislation.gov.uk

Posted January 24th, 2020 in brexit, EC law, legislation by tracey

European Union (Withdrawal Agreement) Act 2020

Source: www.legislation.gov.uk

Jack Simson Caird: The European Union (Withdrawal Agreement) Bill and the Rule of Law – UK Constitutional Law Association

Posted January 20th, 2020 in bills, brexit, constitutional law, courts, EC law, news, parliament, rule of law by sally

‘The general election on 12 December 2019 has fundamentally changed the political dynamic driving the Brexit process. The European Union (Withdrawal Agreement) Bill (WAB), which will become law before 31 January 2020, has been substantially revised (from the version which was presented in October 2019) to reflect this Government’s approach to Brexit. The Bingham Centre for the Rule of Law has published a report that looks in depth at some of the main Rule of Law issues in the WAB. This version of the WAB indicates that this Government will take a different approach from the previous one in terms of dealing with some of the key constitutional issues arising from Brexit. This post examines some of the Rule of Law implications of the main constitutional issues in the WAB.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 16th January 2020

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

Brexit: What You Need To Know On Unaccompanied Child Refugee Rights – Each Other

Posted January 15th, 2020 in asylum, bills, brexit, children, EC law, families, news, refugees by sally

‘The latest version of Withdrawal Agreement Bill (WAB) – which will write prime minister Boris Johnson’s Brexit deal into law – is being debated in the House of Lords this week.’

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Each Other, 14th January 2020

Source: eachother.org.uk

Theodore Konstadinides and Riccardo Sallustio: Clause 26 of the European Union (Withdrawal Agreement) Bill 2019-20: An Exercise of Constitutional Impropriety? – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘The European Union (Withdrawal Agreement) Bill 2019-20 will pave the way for the UK to ratify the UK-EU Withdrawal Agreement and thus depart from the European Union (EU) soon thereafter, having received its third reading in the House of Commons just last week. This contribution examines certain major consequences deriving from the Bill becoming law and, in particular, the controversial, but little discussed Clause 26 which (as Lord Pannick remarked in a recent article in the Times) requires particularly careful scrutiny.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 14th January 2020

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

VAT charges on digital versions of newspapers overturned – OUT-LAW.com

Posted January 9th, 2020 in EC law, electronic commerce, internet, media, news, statutory interpretation, VAT by tracey

‘A major publisher has been successful in overturning a previous ruling that found that the digital versions of its newspapers were subject to VAT charges.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 8th January 2020

Source: www.pinsentmasons.com

Supreme Court ruling in Patel on Zambrano Carers – Richmond Chambers

Posted January 9th, 2020 in carers, citizenship, EC law, news, social security, Supreme Court by sally

‘The Supreme Court delivered its long anticipated judgment on Zambrano carers in Patel v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2019] UKSC 59 on 16 December 2019.’

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Richmond Chambers, 1st January

Source: immigrationbarrister.co.uk

Campaigners call for laws to back up farming standards assurances – The Guardian

Posted January 8th, 2020 in agriculture, animals, brexit, EC law, news, standards by sally

‘The government will move to reassure the public that Britain’s current high standards on animal welfare and farming will be maintained after Brexit with a pledge to ensure future trade deals live up to the values of farmers and consumers.’

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The Guardian, 8th January 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Tafida Raqeeb: Costs Judgment – Transparency Project

‘In 2019, we reported on the tragic case of Tafida Raqeeb. Raqeeb v Barts Health NHS Trust [2019] EWHC 2531 (Admin) and [2019] EWHC 2530 (Fam)). As a brief reminder, Tafida Raqeeb, now aged 5, experienced a catastrophic brain injury in February 2019. The treating hospital believed that it was in her best interests for treatment to be withdrawn. Tafida’s parents disagreed and wished for life-sustaining treatment to continue. They sought alternative options and wanted to take Tafida to Italy for treatment. The Hospital Trust applied to the family court for permission to withdraw treatment. Tafida’s parents also sought judicial review of the Trust’s decision, arguing that the refusal by the Trust to allow Tafida’s parents to transfer her to Italy was an infringement of her EU rights. Mr Justice MacDonald decided that the decision of the Trust was unlawful but declined to grant relief to Tafida. In the proceedings under the Children Act 1989, the application of the NHS Trust, for an order that treatment be withdrawn, was dismissed.’

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Transparency Project, 3rd January 2020

Source: www.transparencyproject.org.uk

10 cases that defined 2019 – UK Human Rights Blog

‘And so, we reach the end of another year. And what a year it has been. As well perhaps the most tumultuous period in British politics for decades, this year saw the first ever image taken of a black hole, a victory for the England men’s cricket team at the World Cup, the discovery of a new species of prehistoric small-bodied human in the Philippines and signs that humpback whale numbers in the South Atlantic have bounced back thanks to intensive conservation efforts. And the law? Well, rather a lot has happened really. As the festive season draws near, what better way is there to celebrate than to rewind the clock and relive the 10 cases which have defined 2019?’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 19th December 2019

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Why ‘where’ matters – jurisdiction considerations for international divorces – Family Law

Posted December 20th, 2019 in brexit, divorce, EC law, families, foreign jurisdictions, international law, jurisdiction, news by tracey

‘The question of whether to seek a divorce is one over which many people agonise. However, for divorcing couples with international connections, the associated questions of when and in which country to get divorced are also extremely important considerations, and ones which can have serious repercussions for the outcome.’

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Family Law, 18th December 2019

Source: www.familylaw.co.uk

Extradition and International update: December 2019 – 5SAH

Posted December 10th, 2019 in EC law, extradition, news, transfer of prisoners, warrants by sally

‘The newsletter features the following articles:

Natasha Draycott:Transfer of sentence from the UK;
Gemma Rose: Provides a case law update on the Public Prosecutor – A ‘judicial authority’?
Louisa Collins: Westminster Rejects Extradition to Nigeria.
Ben Keith & Louisa Collins: 5SAH EXTRADITION: An Introduction for Chambers and Partners.’

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5SAH, December 2019

Source: 5sah.cmail19.com

Supreme Court holds that Dublin III Detention between January 2014 and March 2017 was unlawful – Garden Court Chambers

‘The Supreme Court has dismissed the appeal of the Secretary of State for the Home Department from the Court of Appeal decision in R(Hemmati and others) v SSHD [2018] EWCA Civ 2122 in which it was held that the Home Office was not entitled to detain asylum seekers for removal under the Dublin III Regulation because of the failure until 15 March 2017, to set out in law the requirements for detention.’

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Garden Court Chambers, 27th November 2019

Source: www.gardencourtchambers.co.uk

Foreign statutory schemes – can they register as a registered pension scheme? – Wilberforce Chambers

Posted December 4th, 2019 in EC law, income tax, news, pensions by sally

‘The regime for registered pension schemes, which was first established with effect from A-Day (6 April 2006), is renowned for a number of things. One of those things is the expansion of the categories of person who can establish a pension scheme. However, as a recent case shows, the legislation contains anomalies.’

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Wilberforce Chambers, 24th November 2019

Source: www.wilberforce.co.uk

“The BANGER extension” – Church Court Chambers

Posted December 4th, 2019 in citizenship, EC law, immigration, married persons, news, treaties by sally

‘Islam Khan explores what the “BANGER” extension establishes and how it affects the current “Surinder Singh” principle.’

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Church Court Chambers, 2nd December 2019

Source: churchcourtchambers.co.uk

Supreme Court unanimously rules detention of asylum seekers pending removal was unlawful – UK Human Rights Blog

‘R (Hemmati and others) v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2019] UKSC 56. In a significant public law decision, the Supreme Court dismissed the Secretary of State’s appeal and held that the policy governing detention pending removal fails to comply with the Dublin III Regulation as it lacks adequate certainty and predictability.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 3rd December 2019

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

New Judgment: R (Hemmati & Ors) (AP) v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2019] UKSC 56 – UKSC Blog

‘The five respondents arrived in the United Kingdom illegally and claimed asylum. Each of the respondents was detained for a period of time pending his or her removal from the United Kingdom pursuant to the Immigration Act 1971 of Schedule 2 paragraph 16(2). The respondents challenged the lawfulness of their detention by bringing claims against the Secretary of State for the Home Department.’

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UKSC Blog, 27th November 2019

Source: ukscblog.com