Very Late Applications for Expert Reports: The Key is ‘Significance’ – Ropewalk Chambers

‘In Knapman v Carbines [2020] EWHC 3586 (QB), HHJ Cotter QC considered the balancing exercise to be conducted upon a very late application to rely on an expert report.’

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Ropewalk Chambers, 14th January 2021

Source: www.ropewalk.co.uk

Supplying the answer: when are statefunded services “supply of services for consideration” for VAT purposes? – Monckton Chambers

Posted January 22nd, 2021 in chambers articles, education, HM Revenue & Customs, news, VAT by sally

‘In this case note, Jack Williams of Monckton Chambers analyses the recent decision of the Upper Tribunal in Colchester Institute Corporation v HMRC [2020] UKUT 0368 (“Colchester”). In summary, in overturning the First Tier Tribunal’s decision, the Upper Tribunal held that state-funding did have a sufficient link to the provision of education and vocational training provided by a college to constitute supply of services for consideration and economic activity. Nevertheless, HMRC was entitled to set-off input tax to reduce the taxpayer’s repayment claim. The implications of the case are likely to be profound: many businesses – educational and otherwise – supplying services that are funded by state agencies are now likely to argue that their provision of services does, in fact, constitute the supply of services for consideration and economic activity. That being so, there would be no need to account for output tax on those services and any accounted for with HMRC may be recoverable.’

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Monckton Chambers, January 2021

Source: www.monckton.com

Witnessing Wills During a Pandemic: “You’re on mute” – No. 5 Chambers

Posted January 22nd, 2021 in chambers articles, coronavirus, news, telecommunications, wills, witnesses by sally

‘The Wills Act 1837 (Electronic Communications) (Amendment)(Coronavirus) Order 2020 (SI 2020 No 952) means that it is now possible to witness a will via a video call. These temporary changes are much needed to allow those who want to make or update a will during the Covid-19 pandemic to do so safely and legally.’

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No. 5 Chambers, 21st January 2021

Source: www.no5.com

Fishbourne Developments Limited v Stephens – Parklane Plowden Chambers

‘On 16 December 2020 the Court of Appeal handed down judgment in the case of Fishbourne Development Limited v Stephens. The case concerned the interpretation of an option agreement to acquire a farm comprising fields and farm buildings. Arguments in the case were centred around the meaning of the phrase “any development of the Property” within the option agreement, which was contained within the definition of “Planning Permission”.’

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Parklane Plowden Chambers, 18th January 2021

Source: www.parklaneplowden.co.uk

High Court declines to strike out ordinary claim based on the construction of TCPA 1990, s 106 agreement (Aspire Luxury Homes (Eversley) Ltd v Hart District Council) – No. 5 Chambers

Posted January 22nd, 2021 in abuse of process, appeals, chambers articles, housing, news, planning, striking out by sally

‘Planning analysis: The High Court held that it was not an abuse of process to bring an ordinary civil claim concerning the construction of an agreement under section 106 of the Town and Country Planning Act 1990 (TCPA 1990) (a section 106 agreement). The judge said that, while the validity of a section 106 agreement is highly likely to be a question of public law, suitable only for judicial review (except where it is raised as a defence to an ordinary claim by a local planning authority to enforce an agreement), the construction of TCPA 1990, s 106 agreement was not different in principle to the construction of any contract.’

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No. 5 Chambers, 22nd January 2021

Source: www.no5.com

Latest Instalment in Insurers’ Challenge to CRU Provisions – Ropewalk Chambers

‘In R (on the application of (1) Aviva Insurance Ltd (2) Swiss Reinsurance Company Ltd) v The Secretary of State for Work and Pensions [2021] EWHC 30 (Admin), Henshaw J dealt with certain consequential matters arising from his earlier judgment dated 20 November 2020 which arose from the Claimants’ challenge to the onerous consequences of the Compensation Recovery Unit scheme, particularly in cases involving long-tail asbestos-related diseases.’

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Ropewalk Chambers, 18th January 2021

Source: www.ropewalk.co.uk

Standard of Proof and the Chief Coroner’s Law Sheet No.6 – Maughan and Beyond – Parklane Plowden Chambers

‘On 13th January 2021, the new Chief Coroner, HHJ Teague QC, published Law Sheet No.6. This new guidance comes exactly two months after the Supreme Court gave judgment on 13th November 2020 in the case of R (on the application of Thomas Maughan) v. HM Senior Coroner for Oxfordshire [2020] UKSC 46 where it ruled by majority that all conclusions in coronial inquests, whether short form or narrative, are to be determined on the civil standard of proof: the balance of probabilities.’

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Parklane Plowden Chambers, 19th January 2021

Source: www.parklaneplowden.co.uk

Limitation Practice in Clinical Negligence Cases After Azam – Ropewalk Chambers

Posted January 22nd, 2021 in appeals, chambers articles, delay, doctors, limitations, medical treatment, negligence, news by sally

‘Clinical negligence cases can be complex enough without the added difficulty of delay in bringing proceedings resulting in a limitation defence. When it is raised by Defendants it is currently common for cases to be managed so that limitation will be tried as a preliminary issue, perhaps because of the possibility of a major costs saving if a full trial can be avoided.’

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Ropewalk Chambers, 18th January 2021

Source: www.ropewalk.co.uk

FCA v Arch Insurance (UK) Ltd and others – St John’s Chambers

‘This short note summarises the key parts of the Supreme Court’s decision in this important test case, by which it allowed most of the FCA’s appeals against the decision of the Divisional Court and found largely in favour of policyholders.’

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St John's Chambers, 21st January 2021

Source: www.stjohnschambers.co.uk

Family Law Newsletter – Spire Barristers

Posted January 22nd, 2021 in chambers articles, families, family courts, news by sally

‘Issue #42 of Spire Barristers’ Family Law Newsletter: edited by Connie Purdy and Taz Irshad; news and Case Reviews by Francesca Massarella.’

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Spire Barristers, 15th January 2021

Source: spirebarristers.co.uk

Time to act: the UK Trust Register and the Fifth Money Laundering Directive – Wilberforce Chambers

Posted January 22nd, 2021 in chambers articles, EC law, HM Revenue & Customs, news, trusts by sally

‘HMRC’s registration requirements for trusts may not have been the focus of many practitioners’ attention during 2020, but the 31 January deadline for Trusts Registration Service notifications is likely to focus minds not just on annual compliance requirements, but also on the myriad of changes that have taken place over the past year.’

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Wilberforce Chambers, 19th January 2021

Source: www.wilberforce.co.uk

Abuse of Process – Credit hire brought outside of the MOJ portal – Poku v Abedin – Park Square Barristers

Posted January 13th, 2021 in abuse of process, appeals, chambers articles, damages, news, personal injuries by sally

‘This is an appeal in the matter of Poku v Abedin [2020] by the Claimant against a decision by DDJ Omoregie in which a claim for credit hire was struck out on the grounds that the claim was as an abuse of process. The Claimant had previously raised and settled a personal injury claim through the RTA Portal not including the credit hire charges. The appeal was heard on the 8th October 2020 before Her Honour Judge Backhouse sitting in the RCJ.’

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Park Square Barristers, 6th January 2021

Source: www.parksquarebarristers.co.uk

Credit where credit’s due? A ‘likely’ story – Carmelite Chambers

‘In 2017, the Sentencing Council introduced a Definitive Guideline on Reduction in Sentence for a Guilty plea, leaving Judges with little or no discretion on the credit that can be afforded for pleas entered at the Crown Court, even for indictable only offences.’

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Carmelite Chambers, 11th January 2021

Source: www.carmelitechambers.co.uk

Visiting care home residents – the rules – Doughty Street Chambers

Posted January 8th, 2021 in care homes, chambers articles, coronavirus, news by sally

‘This blog summarises the new care home visiting rules across the UK’s four nations of England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.’

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Doughty Street Chambers, 5th January 2021

Source: insights.doughtystreet.co.uk

Court of Appeal criticises the Immigration Rules and changes law on 10 year rule – 5SAH

Posted January 8th, 2021 in appeals, chambers articles, immigration, news, statutory interpretation by sally

‘The Court of Appeal handed down its long awaited decision in Hoque & Ors v SSHD [2020] EWCA Civ 1357 on the 23 October 2020, here they address the issue of gaps in lawful residence in 10 Years Long residence applications. Specifically, it was the operation of 276B(v) with 39E, which had provided an exception for overstayers, where periods of overstaying could fall to be disregarded under 276B(v), that was the subject of much scrutiny by the Court.’

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5SAH, 5th January 2021

Source: www.5sah.co.uk

Legal Professional Privilege: Breach of a Company Director’s Duties and the Iniquity Exception in Practice – Exchange Chambers

‘LPP has been described as “a fundamental condition on which the administration of justice as a whole rests” (R v Derby Magistrates’ Court, Ex p B [1996] AC 487, 507). In the last few years there has been a significant amount of litigation relating to documents subject to LPP (see for instance Sports Direct International plc v Financial Reporting Council [2020] EWCA Civ 177 and Addlesee v Dentons Europe LLP [2019] EWCA Civ 1600). This is perhaps not surprising given how valuable and sensitive such documents will be in any litigation or investigation by a regulator. Each of these cases tests the boundaries of LPP. The recent decision of Tom Leech QC sitting as a judge of the High Court in Barrowfen is one such decision and particularly important for those who advise directors or are bringing or defending a claim against directors. Barrowfen is an important decision on the iniquity exception in the context of allegations of breaches by a director of his statutory duties under the Companies Act 2006.’

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Exchange Chambers, 4th January 2021

Source: www.exchangechambers.co.uk

Age assessments 2020: a year in review – Doughty Street

Posted January 8th, 2021 in asylum, chambers articles, children, immigration, local government, news by sally

‘This article will provide an overview of some of the key legal cases concerning age assessments and support for those whose age is disputed.’

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Doughty Street, 7th January 2021

Source: insights.doughtystreet.co.uk

Can employees refuse to attend work because of Covid-19? – Blackstone Chambers

Posted January 8th, 2021 in chambers articles, coronavirus, employment, health & safety, news by sally

‘The Covid-19 pandemic has wrought sudden and drastic changes to the workplace. Many are now working from home, to suppress the spread of the virus and protect themselves or their families from catching it. However, working from home is a precaution which is not available to all, and which is available unequally. There has been no better example of this than last week’s drama (prior to the announcement of the third lockdown) over the reopening of schools, with the government, local authorities, unions and individual schools and teachers at loggerheads over whether pupils can safely return to schools after the Christmas break.’

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Blackstone Chambers, 7th January 2021

Source: coronavirus.blackstonechambers.com

The EAW is dead; long live the UK-EU Surrender Agreement – 6KBW College Hill

Posted January 8th, 2021 in brexit, chambers articles, EC law, news by sally

‘On Christmas Eve, the UK and the EU agreed the terms of the Trade and Cooperation Agreement between the European Union and the European Atomic Energy Community of the One Part and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, of the Other Part (“the Trade and Cooperation Agreement”). Title VII of Part 3 of the Trade and Cooperation Agreement governs extradition or, to use the language of the agreement, “surrender arrangements” between the UK and the EU. The effect of these provisions is to closely replicate the arrangements under the Framework Decision on the European Arrest Warrant (“the Framework Decision”) and the surrender agreement between Norway and Iceland and the European Union (“the Iceland/Norway Agreement”).’

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6KBW College Hill, 1st January 2021

Source: blog.6kbw.com

Extradition – A Year in Review of 2020 – A look forward to 2021 – 5SAH

Posted January 8th, 2021 in appeals, chambers articles, extradition, human rights, news by sally

‘2020 has undoubtedly been a most unusual year, but in terms of the evolution of extradition caselaw it has been surprisingly still. As in previous years, extradition appeals have been dominated by Article 8 cases and challenges to European prison conditions. However, fewer extraditions than usual have actually taken place, and not for the obvious reasons (although coronavirus (COVID-19) has caused its own delays). Various challenges have led to large numbers of appeals being stayed pending outcomes of lead cases. Sharmistha Michaels and Rebecca Hill, barristers at Five St Andrew’s Hill, discuss the most important extradition judgments of 2020 and what to expect in 2021.’

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5SAH, 6th January 2021

Source: www.5sah.co.uk