CA rejects privilege challenge to file access in lawyer negligence claim – Legal Futures

‘The solicitors to claimants who acquired a cause of action to sue the insolvent defendant’s lawyers for professional negligence cannot be prevented from accessing privileged material, the Court of Appeal has ruled.’

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Legal Futures, 2nd July 2021

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

Medical agency admin fee “not recoverable” as part of fixed costs – Litigation Futures

‘Defendant solicitors have welcomed a ruling that medical agency costs are irrecoverable under the fixed-costs regime.’

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Litigation Futures, 17th June 2021

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

Insurers must not penalise loyal customers, says FCA – BBC News

‘People renewing their home or motor insurance will pay no more than they would as a new customer from January. The new rules have been confirmed by the City regulator, the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA), following years of complaints.’

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BBC News, 28th May 2021

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Case Comment: Burnett or Grant v International Insurance Company of Hanover Limited [2021] UKSC 12 – UKSC Blog

‘In this post, Harriet Munro and Rowena Williams, members of the insurance disputes team at CMS, discuss the decision of the UK Supreme Court in the matter Burnett or Grant v International Insurance Company of Hanover Limited [2021] UKSC 12, which concerns the application of a ‘deliberate acts’ exclusion in insurance policies.’

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UKSC Blog, 21st May 2021

Source: ukscblog.com

Alerter by Ben Norton – Meaning of ‘deliberate’, ‘concealment’ and ‘breach of duty’ under s.32 Limitation Act 1980 – Henderson Chambers

Posted April 15th, 2021 in consumer credit, insurance, limitations, news by sally

‘Ben Norton considers the meaning of “deliberate”, “concealment” and “breach of duty” under s.32 Limitation Act 1980 in the context of the Consumer Credit Act’s unfair relationship provisions following Canada Square Operations Ltd v Potter.’

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Henderson Chambers, 19th March 2021

Source: www.hendersonchambers.co.uk

Inquests for insurers: why they are relevant – Mills & Reeve

Posted April 15th, 2021 in coroners, inquests, insurance, news by sally

‘Inquests are valuable to insurers as Neil Ward explains. They offer a unique opportunity to hear evidence on all of the key issues which are likely to arise in determining liability arising out of any claim following a death.’

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Mills & Reeve, 13th April 2021

Source: www.mills-reeve.com

SRA backs new cyber-losses clause for indemnity policies – Legal Futures

‘The extent to which losses caused by cyber attacks are covered by law firms’ professional indemnity insurance (PII) policies is to be clarified by the Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA).’

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Legal Futures, 14th April 2021

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

Injured off-road victims ‘sacrificed at hands of Brexit’, say lawyers – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted March 2nd, 2021 in agriculture, brexit, insurance, motorcycles, news, personal injuries, sport by sally

‘Personal injury lawyers have warned that the UK government’s decision to ditch a European ruling on private land vehicles risks sacrificing the rights of injured people “in the name of Brexit”.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 1st March 2021

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Insolvent Defendants – St John’s Chambers

Posted February 11th, 2021 in chambers articles, insolvency, insurance, news, personal injuries, third parties by sally

‘The continuing impact of the Covid-19 pandemic is slowly but surely beginning to cast a shadow over personal injury claims. As the months have rolled on, viable businesses, starved of custom, are facing the prospect of being forced to cease trading. Those same businesses are the Defendants in many ongoing and pending claims. So, what happens when a Defendant becomes insolvent?’

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St John's Chambers, February 2021

Source: stjohnsbuildings.com

Irwell v Watson: tribunals as a one stop shop – by John Bowers QC – Littleton Chambers

Posted February 11th, 2021 in chambers articles, employment tribunals, insurance, news, third parties by sally

‘Employment tribunals were intended when first introduced in 1963 to be easily accessible, simple, and straightforward but have gradually taken on more of the appearance of courts. There was a somewhat naive belief in the beginning that justice in such tribunals could be achieved without the parties needing lawyers. The presiding officer was called a chair but is now a judge. And tribunals of course now deal with cases of great complexity, recondite legal areas and with millions at stake. A continuing fundamental difference from a court, however, is that the tribunal has no inherent jurisdiction but only what the dizzying array of statutes provide them.’

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Littleton Chambers, 5th February 2021

Source: littletonchambers.com

Case Comment: Halliburton Company v Chubb Bermuda Insurance Ltd (Formerly known as Ace Bermuda Insurance Ltd) [2020] UKSC 48 – UKSC Blog

‘In this post, Neil Newing and Olivia Flasch who both practice at Signature Litigation, comment upon the decision handed down by the UK Supreme Court in the matter of Halliburton Company v Chubb Bermuda Insurance Ltd (Formerly known as Ace Bermuda Insurance Ltd) [2020] UKSC 48. They ask: is the decision a missed opportunity?’

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UKSC Blog, 2nd February 2021

Source: ukscblog.com

Solicitor fined for failing to disclose counsel’s opinions to ATE insurer – Litigation Futures

‘An experienced solicitor who failed to disclose two counsel’s opinions on a case to an after-the-event (ATE) insurer, one of them assessing chances of success at less than 50%, has been fined £8,000.’

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Litigation Futures, 27th January 2021

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

Latest Instalment in Insurers’ Challenge to CRU Provisions – Ropewalk Chambers

‘In R (on the application of (1) Aviva Insurance Ltd (2) Swiss Reinsurance Company Ltd) v The Secretary of State for Work and Pensions [2021] EWHC 30 (Admin), Henshaw J dealt with certain consequential matters arising from his earlier judgment dated 20 November 2020 which arose from the Claimants’ challenge to the onerous consequences of the Compensation Recovery Unit scheme, particularly in cases involving long-tail asbestos-related diseases.’

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Ropewalk Chambers, 18th January 2021

Source: www.ropewalk.co.uk

FCA v Arch Insurance (UK) Ltd and others – St John’s Chambers

‘This short note summarises the key parts of the Supreme Court’s decision in this important test case, by which it allowed most of the FCA’s appeals against the decision of the Divisional Court and found largely in favour of policyholders.’

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St John's Chambers, 21st January 2021

Source: www.stjohnschambers.co.uk

New Judgment: Financial Conduct Authority v Arch Insurance (UK) Ltd and Ors [2021] UKSC 1 – UKSC Blog

‘In March 2020, the UK Government began to take a series of measures to combat the transmission of COVID-19. The present appeals considered the impact of these actions and measures on 28 clauses in the 21 lead policies written by the Appellant Insurers.’

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UKSC Blog, 15th January 2021

Source: ukscblog.com

LEI does not have to fund appeals during “unmeritorious claims” – Litigation Futures

‘Legal expenses insurance (LEI) does not have to fund interlocutory appeals that are likely to succeed as part of claims that overall are predicted to fail, the High Court has ruled.’

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Litigation Futures, 5th January 2021

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

No business interruption decision from Supreme Court until next year – Law Society’s Gazette

‘Judgment in an urgent test case to determine whether businesses hit by Covid-19 will receive insurance pay-outs will not be handed down by the Supreme Court until January at the earliest. Five Supreme Court justices heard a case between the Financial Conduct Authority and six insurance companies in November. The dispute concerned business interruption insurance (BII) and the court was asked to rule on provisions in insurance policies relating to disease clauses, prevention of access clauses and hybrid clauses.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 15th December 2020

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Claimants in breast implant case buy cause of action to sue defendant’s lawyers – Litigation Futures

‘A leading defendant law firm and a QC have failed to strike out a professional negligence action brought after the claimants in a case they defended acquired their insolvent client’s cause of action.’

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Litigation Futures, 16th December 2020

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

3,000 law firms “could be forced to close or merge” – Legal Futures

Posted December 8th, 2020 in conveyancing, coronavirus, insurance, law firms, legal services, loans, mergers, news by sally

‘As many as 3,000 law firms could be forced to close or merge over the next few years after the conveyancing bubble bursts and the recession really kicks in, a leading law firm consultant has warned.’

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Legal Futures, 8th December 2020

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

The law applicable to an arbitration agreement: Part 1 of our analysis of Enka v OOO Insurance – Hardwicke Chambers

‘In the eagerly awaited judgment in Enka Insaat Ve Sanayi AS v OOO Insurance Company Chubb [2020] UKSC 38, the Supreme Court finally settled an important issue in the law of arbitration that has long divided the authorities and commentary: in the absence of a choice by the parties, where the law applicable to the main contract differs from that of the seat, it is the law of the seat that governs the validity and scope of the arbitration agreement. Our Overview on the decision sets out the key holdings; Part I (below) of our commentary on the decision examines the reasoning of the Majority in greater depth.’

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Hardwicke Chambers, 2nd December 2020

Source: hardwicke.co.uk