Thomas Fairclough: What’s New About the Rule of Law? A Reply to Michal Hain – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘This blog recently published a detailed piece by Michal Hain. He made some very interesting claims that this note will examine. I start by explaining Hain’s arguments and ordering them roughly according to the way they come out in his piece. I then examine each in greater detail giving my own views. Finally, I will conclude with some general points about constitutionalism and individual cases.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 18th September 2017

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

Landmark appeal judgment dents libel threshold hopes – Law Society’s Gazette

‘A Court of Appeal ruling has dealt a blow to hopes that the 2013 Defamation Act would raise the bar to libel actions in England and Wales courts. In Bruno Lachaux v Independent Print Limited and Evening Standard Limited, and Bruno Lachaux v AOL (UK) Limited, the court dismissed an appeal by publishers against a High Court finding that a French national living in Dubai had been caused “serious harm” by the publication of allegations by his former wife.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 12th September 2017

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Michal Hain: Guardians of the Constitution – the Constitutional Implications of a Substantive Rule of Law – UK Constitutional Law Association

Posted September 12th, 2017 in constitutional reform, news, rule of law, statutory interpretation by tracey

‘A constitutional storm is brewing. Whilst it is too early to perform the burial rites for parliamentary sovereignty, the Supreme Court’s decisions in R (UNISON) v Lord Chancellor [2017] UKSC 51 and R (Evans) v Attorney-General [2015] UKSC 21 are the beginning of the end of the principle’s unrivalled reign. Two especially thorny constitutional issues arose in both cases. One concerns the extent to which statutory interpretation can be used as a tool to resolve conflicts between cherished constitutional values (such as the rule of law) and the explicit wording of a statute. Just as importantly, a distinct question of constitutional interpretation arises with regard to deriving meaning from such values; in other words, how are courts to determine what the “rule of law” in fact demands? What is at stake in this second debate is exemplified by the controversy surrounding the doctrine of substantive due process in the constitutional law of the United States. Whilst it is clear that UNISON and Evans embody a forceful judicial response in the face of inroads on the rule of law, it is less clear what approach courts will take to interpreting constitutional principles in the future.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 12th September 2017

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

Database rights can subsist in PDFs, rules High Court – OUT-LAW.com

‘A PDF version of a document can constitute a database and information contained in it can be protected by database rights, the High Court in London has ruled.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 8th September 2017

Source: www.out-law.com

R (Davey) v Oxfordshire CC in the Court of Appeal – Community Care Blog

‘Last Friday the Court of Appeal delivered judgment in R (Davey) v Oxfordshire CC [2017] EWCA Civ 1308. This is the first time the Court of Appeal has examined the provisions of the Care Act 2014.’

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Community Care Blog, 7th September 2017

Source: communitycare11kbw.com

Arbitration: ‘Non-existent’ respondents – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted September 4th, 2017 in arbitration, jurisdiction, news, ships, statutory interpretation, succession by sally

‘Where the claimant in an arbitration ceases to exist, it is usually the respondent who contends that the arbitration has been or should be brought to an end. There may then be an issue whether the claimant’s claim in arbitration can survive by, for example, a principle of universal succession (Eurosteel Ltd v Stinnes AG [2000] CLC 470).’

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Law Society's Gazette, 4th September 2017

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Database Rights and Copyright: Technomed v Bluecrest Health Screening – NIPC Law

‘This was an action for infringement of database right and copyright in an electrocardiogram (“ECG”) analysis and reporting system known as ECG Cloud.’

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NIPC Law, 2nd September 2017

Source: nipclaw.blogspot.co.uk

The Wages of Sin is: the Ability to Rely on Section 12 – Panopticon

‘What happens when your FOIA request to a public authority is met with the response that it would breach the cost limits set under section 12 to respond to the request because the authority’s record keeping systems are in a particular (i.e. poor) state? In a word: tough.’

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Panopticon, 24th August 2017

Source: panopticonblog.com

Parks police dismissal does not engage article 8 – UK Police Law Blog

‘The recent case of Vining & Ors v London Borough of Wandsworth [2017] EWCA Civ 1092 represents an attempt to circumvent restrictions on certain types of officers from enjoying employment law rights – in a claim of unfair dismissal and for a protective award in respect of an alleged failure in collective consultation relating to their redundancies.’

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UK Police Law Blog, 15th August 2017

Source: ukpolicelawblog.com

Dwelling in temporary accommodation – Nearly Legal

Posted August 14th, 2017 in housing, local government, news, repossession, statutory interpretation by sally

‘When is temporary accommodation provided under the Housing Act 1996 Section 193(2) duty occupied ‘as a dwelling’ fo the purposes of Section 3 Protection from Eviction Act 1977?’

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Nearly Legal, 13th August 2017

Source: nearlylegal.co.uk

Collective (in)action? The CAT’s recent judgments on collective proceedings orders – Competition Bulletin

‘At first glance, two recent judgments from the CAT may give the impression that the new UK class action regime is dead in the water. However, on closer inspection there is much in these judgments that prospective claimants will welcome.’

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Competition Bulletin, 4th August 2017

Source: competitionbulletin.com

Prevent Duty Guidance withstands “clamorous” criticism – Marina Wheeler QC – UK Human Rights Blog

‘In the wake of the London and Manchester attacks, the government’s counter-terrorism strategy is increasingly in the news and under scrutiny. Radicalisation is a difficult concept to map on to a system like ours, which separates the definition of criminal behaviour and punishment from civil sanctions. In this week’s podcast, Marina Wheeler discusses some of the ways the law is trying to cope (Law Pod UK Episode 8, available on Monday 7 August). She and others from 1 Crown Office Row will be discussing this and related issues at a seminar on Monday 11 September. You will find full details at the end of this post.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 5th August 2017

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Copyright: Primary Infringement – Communicating a Work to the Public – NIPC Law

‘Copyright is defined by s.1 (1) of the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 (“the CDPA”) as “a property right” which subsists in accordance with Part I of the Act in original artistic, dramatic, literary and musical work, broadcasts, films and sound recordings and typography. A work in which copyright subsists is known as “a copyright work” pursuant to s.1 (2). The owner of a copyright in a copyright work has the exclusive right to do certain acts that are restricted to the copyright owner (see s.2 (1) CDPA). More importantly, the copyright owner has the exclusive right to prevent others from doing those acts which are often referred to as “restricted acts”.’

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NIPC Law, 28th July 2017

Source: nipclaw.blogspot.co.uk

Self-employed workers do not have the same rights as employees under EU law, confirms the Court of Appeal – Free Movement

‘In the case of Hrabkova v Secretary of State for Work and Pension [2017] EWCA Civ 794, the Court of Appeal confirmed once again that self-employed individuals do not have the same rights as workers under EU law. The specific question in this case was whether a person with a child at school who had been self employed and ceased work might be entitled to claim Employment Support Allowance.’

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Free Movement, 2nd July 2017

Source: www.freemovement.org.uk

Whether a Room is a “Bedroom” for the Purposes of the Bedroom Tax – Garden Court Chambers

‘In Secretary of State for Work and Pensions v The City of Glasgow Council & IB [2017] CSIH 35, 31 May 2017 (Lord Brodie, Lady Clark of Calton and Lord Glennie) the Court of Session in Scotland considered what factors should be taken into account in establishing whether a room is a bedroom for the purposes of Reg B13 of the Housing Benefit Regulations 2006 SI 2013 (the bedroom tax).’

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Garden Court Chambers, 3rd July 2017

Source: www.gardencourtchambers.co.uk

The end for the Mawer v Bland order? – Hardwicke Chambers

Posted July 5th, 2017 in bankruptcy, news, statutory interpretation, trustees in bankruptcy by sally

‘In an earlier edition of this publication I identified what appeared to be a growing trend for the making of a draconian form of order suspending the discharge of bankruptcies.’

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Hardwicke Chambers, 26th June 2017

Source: www.hardwicke.co.uk

John Lyon’s Charity v London Sephardi Trust [2017] EWCA Civ 846 (CA) – Tanfield Chambers

‘On 29 June 2017 the Court of Appeal gave judgment on an interesting question of statutory construction concerning the valuation provisions in section 9 of the Leasehold Reform Act 1967 (“LRA67”) and the Interpretation Act 1978 (“the Interpretation Act”).’

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Tanfield Chambers, 29th June 2017

Source: www.tanfieldchambers.co.uk

Animals Act Appeal Case Law – Park Square Barristers

Posted July 5th, 2017 in appeals, damages, horses, news, personal injuries, statutory interpretation by sally

‘Langstaff J upheld on appeal a first instance decision dismissing a claimant’s claim for injury when he fell from a horse.’

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Park Square Barristers, 23rd June 2017

Source: www.parksquarebarristers.co.uk

Field Reports: Kingsbridge Pension Fund Trust v David Michael Downs – Tanfield Chambers

‘The Upper Tribunal (Lands Chamber) has held that, in determining whether a person is eligible to apply for a new tenancy on retirement of a tenant under the Agricultural Holdings Act 1986, the livelihood condition need only be satisfied in the 7 year period running up to the date when the retirement notice was given, and not in the 7 year period preceding the determination of the application by the Tribunal.’

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Tanfield Chambers, 4th July 2017

Source: www.tanfieldchambers.co.uk

No bans on local authority disinvestment decisions – UK Human Rights Blog

‘Many people like to have a say over the investment policies of their pension funds. They may not want investment in fossil fuels, companies with questionable working practices, arms manufacturers, Israel or indeed any company which supports Israel’s occupation of the West Bank and Gaza Strip – to choose but a few of people’s current choices. And pension funds, left to their own devices, may wish to adopt one or more of these choices to reflect their pensioners’ views.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 25th June 2017

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com