Fishbourne Developments Limited v Stephens – Parklane Plowden Chambers

‘On 16 December 2020 the Court of Appeal handed down judgment in the case of Fishbourne Development Limited v Stephens. The case concerned the interpretation of an option agreement to acquire a farm comprising fields and farm buildings. Arguments in the case were centred around the meaning of the phrase “any development of the Property” within the option agreement, which was contained within the definition of “Planning Permission”.’

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Parklane Plowden Chambers, 18th January 2021

Source: www.parklaneplowden.co.uk

“Wrongful Life” Revisited – UK Human Rights Blog

‘In Evie Toombes v. Dr. Philip Mitchell [2020] EWHC 3506 the High Court has given renewed consideration to claims for, so called, “wrongful life”. Can a disabled person ever claim damages on the basis that they would not have been born but for the defendant’s negligence? The Court answered that question with a resounding “yes”.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 21st January 2021

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Official Solicitor wins appeal over ability of mother and step-father of autistic man to leave homes to provide care during first lockdown – Local Government Lawyer

‘The Official Solicitor has won an appeal on behalf of a 30-year-old with autism and communication difficulties over whether his mother and step-father had a reasonable excuse during the first national lockdown to leave their homes to provide him with care.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 19th January 2021

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Court of Appeal rules on whether VAT is payable on top of caps on costs in Aarhus Convention claims – Local Government Lawyer

Posted January 14th, 2021 in airports, civil procedure rules, costs, news, statutory interpretation, treaties, VAT by tracey

‘The caps set out in the Civil Procedure Rules on the costs payable by losing parties in Aarhus Convention claims are inclusive of VAT, the Court of Appeal has ruled as part of the third Heathrow runway litigation.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 13th January 2021

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Court of Appeal criticises the Immigration Rules and changes law on 10 year rule – 5SAH

Posted January 8th, 2021 in appeals, chambers articles, immigration, news, statutory interpretation by sally

‘The Court of Appeal handed down its long awaited decision in Hoque & Ors v SSHD [2020] EWCA Civ 1357 on the 23 October 2020, here they address the issue of gaps in lawful residence in 10 Years Long residence applications. Specifically, it was the operation of 276B(v) with 39E, which had provided an exception for overstayers, where periods of overstaying could fall to be disregarded under 276B(v), that was the subject of much scrutiny by the Court.’

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5SAH, 5th January 2021

Source: www.5sah.co.uk

Kenneth Armstrong: Governing With or Without Consent – The United Kingdom Internal Market Act 2020 – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘The United Kingdom Internal Market Act has become law, receiving Royal Assent shortly before MPs and Lords departed the Palace of Westminster for the holidays. The controversial provisions in Part 5 conflicting with the EU-UK Withdrawal Agreement and Northern Ireland Protocol – previously discussed by me here – have been removed following the outcome of a meeting of the EU-UK Joint Committee that resolved – at least for the moment – outstanding issues in the practical implementation of the Protocol.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 18th December 2020

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

Former appeal court judge to lead UK review of Human Rights Act – The Guardian

Posted December 8th, 2020 in human rights, judges, news, statutory interpretation, treaties by sally

‘A former court of appeal judge has been appointed to lead a review into how the Human Rights Act (HRA) is being interpreted in UK courts.’

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The Guardian, 7th December 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Alison L Young: The Draft Fixed-term Parliaments Act 2011 (Repeal) Bill: Turning Back the Clock? – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘Things were different in 2010. If schools closed and households found themselves stuck indoors, or unable to travel abroad, it was due to snowstorms and erupting Icelandic volcanoes, not because of a pandemic. Moreover, if the then Prime Minister wished to dissolve Parliament, he did not need to adhere to the requirements of the Fixed-term Parliaments Act 2011, which fixed parliamentary terms to five years, allowing for early parliamentary general elections either following a vote of two-thirds of the House of Commons in favour of an early parliamentary general election, or following a vote of no confidence. Instead, so the draft Fixed-term Parliaments Act 2011 (Repeal) Bill would have us believe, the Prime Minister could dissolve Parliament and instigate a new general election by use of a prerogative power, at a date of his choosing unchecked by the courts, subject only to ensuring Parliament did not exceed its maximum term of five years.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 4th December 2020

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

New Judgment: Commissioners for Her Majesty’s Revenue & Customs v London Clubs Management Ltd [2020] UKSC 49 – UKSC Blog

Posted November 30th, 2020 in appeals, gambling, news, statutory interpretation, Supreme Court by sally

‘The Supreme Court has unanimously dismissed this appeal concerning the correct approach as to determining the value of non-negotiable chips for the purpose of calculating gaming duty.’

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UKSC Blog, 27th November 2020

Source: ukscblog.com

The cart before the horse when requesting an adjudicator: Land End Developments Construction Limited v Kingstone Civil Engineering Limited [2020] EWHC 2338 – Hardwicke Chambers

‘These proceedings related to an adjudicator’s decision dated 27th April 2020 (“the 27th April Decision”) under the Scheme for Construction Contracts (England and Wales) Regulations 1998 as amended (“the Scheme”). Lane End Developments Construction Limited (“Lane End”) was the main contractor on a housing development (“the Development”) and Kingstone Civil Engineering Limited (“Kingstone”) was sub-contracted to carry out enabling works for the Development. On 2nd March 2020, Kingstone issued Interim Payment Application No. 17 in the sum of £356,439.19, but Lane End did not serve a Pay Less Notice nor, until 26th March, did it serve a Payment Notice.’

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Hardwicke Chambers, 13th November 2020

Source: hardwicke.co.uk

When is suitable? – Nearly Legal

Posted November 25th, 2020 in appeals, housing, local government, news, statutory duty, statutory interpretation by sally

‘When assessing the suitability of a (refused) offer of accommodation made under s.193 Housing Act 1996 duty, what is the relevant date, or dates? That was the issue for the Court of Appeal in this second appeal by Bromley from a s.204 appeal which had quashed Bromley’s decision that the accommodation offered was suitable.’

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Nearly Legal, 23rd November 2020

Source: nearlylegal.co.uk

New Judgment: Test Claimants in the Franked Investment Income Group Litigation & Ors v Commissioners of Inland Revenue (1) [2020] UKSC 47 – UKSC Blog

‘The Supreme Court has unanimously allowed this long-awaited appeal arising in the course of long-running proceedings known as the Franked Investment Income (“FII”) Group Litigation. The FII Group Litigation brings together many claims concerning the way in which advance corporation tax and corporation tax used to be charged on dividends received by UK-resident companies from non-resident subsidiaries. The respondents to this appeal are claimants within the FII Group Litigation whose cases have been selected to proceed as test claims on certain common issues (“the Test Claimants”). These issues are being determined in phases, with the courts’ decisions affecting not just the other claims within the FII Group Litigation, but potentially also a number of other sets of proceedings brought by corporate taxpayers against the appellant, the Commissioners for Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs (“HMRC”).’

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UKSC Blog, 20th November 2020

Source: ukscblog.com

Deprivation of liberty: Unlawful placements of children – Transparency Project

‘Can an English family court order the unlawful detention of a Welsh child?’

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Transparency Project, 22nd November 2020

Source: www.transparencyproject.org.uk

A non-sexually motivated sexual assault?: GMC v Haris [2020] EWHC 2518 (Admin) – 2 Hare Court

‘Dr Haris faced allegations from two patients that he had conducted non-clinically indicated, intimate examinations without consent. He asserted forcefully that the alleged conduct simply never happened – and also called additional evidence to support his position that he was asexual.’

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2 Hare Court, 5th November 2020

Source: www.2harecourt.com

The Illegality Defence in the Supreme Court again – Littleton Chambers

‘The common law defence of illegality was considered by the Supreme Court in Patel v Mirza [2016] UKSC 42. The Court rejected the reliance principle as applied in Tinsley v Milligan [1994] 1 AC 340, according to which relief was refused to parties who had to rely on their own illegality to establish their case. In its place, the majority adopted a more flexible approach which openly addressed the underlying policy considerations involved and invited Courts to reach a balanced judgment in each case, permitting account to be taken of the proportionality of the outcome.’

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Littleton Chambers, 4th November 2020

Source: littletonchambers.com

Reconsideration or review? – Local Government Lawyer

Posted November 2nd, 2020 in appeals, jurisdiction, local government, news, planning, statutory interpretation by tracey

‘Owain Rhys James looks at an inspector’s jurisdiction under section 195 of the Town and Country Planning Act.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 30th October 2020

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

FS v RS and JS – A Most Unusual Case about the bank of mum and dad… – Transparency Project

‘Described as “a most unusual case”, the Family Court at the Royal Courts of Justice recently dismissed a forty-one-year-old son’s claim that the “bank of mum and dad” was legally obligated to maintain him. Most court orders for the payment of maintenance of children provide for that obligation to end at the age of 18 or upon the child leaving school. The courts retain jurisdiction to make or vary orders for maintenance of children in limited circumstances, including where there is already a court order in force, to meet expenses in connection with education or training for a trade, profession or vocation, and where the child has expenses attributable to a disability. In FS v RS and JS [2020] EWFC 63, Sir James Munby considered whether the court had jurisdiction in relation to claims under the Matrimonial Causes Act 1973 and the Children Act 1989 and whether jurisdiction under the inherent jurisdiction could be exercised as the Applicant asserted. This is an overview of Munby J’s remarkable judgment in light of an unprecedented proposition upon the court’s traditionally paternal or parental character.’

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Transparency Project, 19th October 2020

Source: www.transparencyproject.org.uk

When is it too harsh to separate a child from their parent? – UK Human Rights Blog

‘There has, in recent years, been a proliferation of case law on appeals against deportation by foreign national criminals on grounds of private and family life. The statutory scheme is complex enough, but the various tests (“unduly harsh”, “very compelling circumstances”) have also been subject to extensive judicial gloss, leaving practitioners and judges to wade through a confusing sea of alphabet-country soup case names.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 16th October 2020

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Were the March 2020 lockdown restrictions lawfully imposed? (Part 1) — Emmet Coldrick – UK Human Rights Blog

‘The Health Protection (Coronavirus, Restrictions) (England) Regulations 2020 (“the Regulations”) contained the most draconian restrictions on the liberty of the general population ever imposed in England. They purported to create several new criminal offences (see reg. 9), including an offence of contravening a regulation that “… no person may leave the place where they are living without reasonable excuse” (see reg. 6) and an offence of contravening, without reasonable excuse, a regulation that (subject to limited exceptions) “no person may participate in a gathering in a public place of more than two people” (see reg. 7).’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 24th September 2020

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Ronan Cormacain: The United Kingdom Internal Market Bill and Breach of Domestic Law – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘Huge controversy has already been generated over provisions in the United Kingdom Internal Market Bill granting Ministers the power to disapply the Withdrawal Agreement. Most of the debate (Elliott, Armstrong) has been focused on the potential breaches of international law. This could severely damage the reputation of the United Kingdom in the world. However, what has been relatively overlooked is that this Bill is also a flagrant attack on the Rule of Law at the UK domestic level. This remains the case even if amendments proposed by Sir Bob Neill MP (and apparently accepted by the Government) pass.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 23rd September 2020

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org