Property Litigation column: Wednesbury unreasonable and landlords: No.1 West India Quay – Hardwicke Chambers

Posted February 19th, 2019 in appeals, consent, interpretation, landlord & tenant, leases, news, repairs, Supreme Court by sally

‘In property law, discretionary powers are common. Such discretionary powers most often confer, on one contracting party, a discretionary power to grant or withhold consent for such things as changes of use, building, or alterations including the grant of consent. They are frequently found in restrictive covenants and in leases and include, for example, “Jervis v Harris” clauses which allow a landlord, during the term of a lease, to enter the demised premises and carry out works to remedy disrepair. The question of how a Court should approach a challenge to the exercise, under a contract, of a discretionary power is an old chestnut.’

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Hardwicke Chambers, 15th February 2019

Source: hardwicke.co.uk

Nicholas Siddall on Uber: Form, Substance and Judicial Intervention – Littleton Chambers

Posted February 19th, 2019 in appeals, contract of employment, news, self-employment, Supreme Court, taxis by sally

‘The long running saga of whether Uber drivers are workers has been decided in the Court of Appeal and a split court has granted permission to appeal. This blog analyses the differing approaches in the Court of Appeal and the arguments that are likely to be advanced before the Supreme Court.’

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Littleton Chambers, 23rd January 2019

Source: www.littletonchambers.com

Case Comment: Perry v Raleys Solicitors [2019] UKSC 5 – UKSC Blog

‘Rory Thomson, a senior associate in the disputes team at CMS, comments on the judgment of the UK Supreme Court in the case of Perry v Raleys Solicitors, which was handed down on 13 February 2019. The judgment is a useful affirmation and clarification of the law on the assessment of causation and loss in professional negligence cases.’

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UKSC Blog, 18th February 2019

Source: ukscblog.com

Ep. 67: Remediation – Mathew Barnes – Law Pod UK

‘Taken from our recent seminar, ‘Erasure, Remediation and Rights of Appeal in Disciplinary Proceedings’, Mathew Barnes asks the question in his talk about remediation – Can you teach an old dog new tricks?’

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Law Pod UK, 18th February 2019

Source: audioboom.com

New Judgment: Perry v Raleys Solicitors [2019] UKSC 5 – UKSC Blog

‘Considers liability and damages where the appellant solicitor negligently failed to advise a client of a potential claim against a third party. Held: allowing the appeal, loss of chance damages have been developed by the courts to deal with the difficulties arising from the assessment of counter-factual and future events. In both types of situation, the courts at times depart from the ordinary burden on a claimant to prove the facts required for a successful claim on the balance of probabilities. However, this does not mean that the basic requirement that a negligence claim requires proof that loss has been caused by the breach of duty is abandoned. Applying this approach, the respondent needed to prove that, properly advised, he would have made a claim within time. Further, the judge was correct to impose the additional requirement of the claim having to be an honest claim.’

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UKSC Blog, 13th February 2019

Source: ukscblog.com

New Judgment: Wells v Devani [2019] UKSC 4 – UKSC Blog

Posted February 14th, 2019 in agency, contracts, estate agents, interpretation, news, sale of land, Supreme Court by sally

‘This appeal considered whether, where a commission agent and his principal have not expressly, in their oral discussions, identified and agreed the precise event upon which commission is payable, but have expressly agreed in those oral discussions that a commission would be payable at an agreed percentage, their bargain is incomplete. It also considered whether the court can (whether by taking into account the relevant surrounding factual matrix or what the parties said, or the parties’ conduct), imply a term identifying the commission entitling event which gives business efficacy to the parties’ presumed common intention.’

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UKSC Blog, 13th February 2019

Source: ukscblog.com

Uncontested flight delay claims “not litigation”, CA rules – Litigation Futures

Posted February 13th, 2019 in airlines, appeals, compensation, costs, delay, news, statistics, Supreme Court by sally

‘The work done by pioneering law firm Bott & Co in bringing uncontested flight delay claims does not amount to litigation services and so it cannot claim an equitable lien over the damages for its costs, the Court of Appeal has ruled.’

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Litigation Futures, 13th February 2019

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

Men who wrongly served 24 years in prison denied compensation – The Independent

‘Two men who between them spent 24 years in prison before their convictions were overturned are not entitled to compensation, judges have ruled.’

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The Independent, 30th January 2019

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Thousands with minor convictions could be allowed to hide them when applying to work in schools and hospitals after a landmark supreme court ruling – Daily Telegraph

Posted January 31st, 2019 in criminal records, disclosure, employment, news, Supreme Court, vetting by tracey

‘Thousands of people with minor or old convictions could be freed from having to declare them to employers in children’s and other services after a landmark supreme court judgement.’

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Daily Telegraph, 30th January 2019

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Single mother takes government to court after being forced into homelessness due to housing benefit shortfall – The Independent

Posted January 31st, 2019 in benefits, homelessness, housing, local government, news, Supreme Court by tracey

‘A single mother of four who was was forced into homelessness due to a shortfall in housing benefit is to challenge the government in Britain’s highest court.’

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The Independent, 31st January 2019

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Case Comment: Michalak v GMC [2017] UKSC 71 – UKSC Blog

‘The case was about the meaning of the Equality Act 2010, s 120(7), which removes from the jurisdiction of the employment tribunal any decision which is “subject to an appeal or proceedings in the nature of an appeal”.’

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UKSC Blog, 29th January 2019

Source: ukscblog.com

Case Comment: R v Mackinlay & Ors [2018] UKSC 42 – UKSC Blog

Posted January 30th, 2019 in appeals, elections, expenses, gifts, news, statutory interpretation, Supreme Court by sally

‘This case relates to a point of statutory construction in the Representation of the People Act 1983, s 90C(1)(a). The question was whether goods, services, or facilities provided free-of-charge or at a discount to a candidate for election need to be declared by the candidate as an election expense even if they had not been authorised by the candidate, their election agent, or someone else authorised by the candidate or agent.’

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UKSC Blog, 29th January 2019

Source: ukscblog.com

Minor offences may stay secret after legal challenge fails – The Guardian

‘Some people with minor, past convictions may not have to disclose them in future after the government lost a legal challenge aimed at preserving its system of criminal record checks.’

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The Guardian, 30th January 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

Elizabeth Adams: Prisoners’ Voting Rights: Case Closed? – UK Constitutional Law Association

Posted January 30th, 2019 in elections, enfranchisement, human rights, news, prisons, Supreme Court by sally

‘On 6 December 2018, the Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe closed the supervision of the prisoners’ voting rights cases against the United Kingdom (UK) and adopted final resolution CM/ResDH(2018)467. Thirteen years after Hirst v United Kingdom (No.2) (2006) 42 EHRR 41 (Hirst) was made final, the protracted prisoner voting stalemate is over. Case closed. Or is it?’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 30th January 2019

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

Woman found to have defamed ex-husband on Facebook takes fight to Supreme Court – Daily Telegraph

Posted January 24th, 2019 in appeals, assault, costs, defamation, domestic violence, families, news, Supreme Court, women by tracey

‘A woman who claimed on Facebook that her ex-husband tried to strangle her is set to fight a judge’s ruling that she is guilty of defamation because he wasn’t trying to kill her. Nicola Stocker, 51, will argue before the Supreme Court that she had used common language to describe the attack by her millionaire ex-husband, for which he was arrested, when talking to his new lover.’

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Daily Telegraph, 23rd January 2019

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Court of Appeal says no to indefinite delay to insolvency case – OUT-LAW.com

Posted January 18th, 2019 in appeals, debts, delay, foreign jurisdictions, insolvency, news, Supreme Court by tracey

‘The Court of Appeal has said that English courts will not indefinitely delay a case, preventing English creditors from pursuing claims in insolvency proceedings abroad, especially when the foreign proceedings had ended. It said that an English debt can only be discharged by an English law process.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 17th January 2019

Source: www.out-law.com

Court caps appeal costs to keep ‘some semblance of reasonableness’ – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted January 17th, 2019 in airlines, appeals, costs, costs capping orders, indemnities, news, pensions, Supreme Court by tracey

‘The High Court has taken the proactive step of capping the costs of a litigant before they pursue an appeal through the Supreme Court. Mr Justice Arnold said the claimant in Airways Pension Scheme Trustee Ltd v Fielder & Anor should be limited to the same costs as the defendant – in doing so shaving around £200,000 from the costs estimate.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 16th January 2019

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

More flexibility, but potentially more disputes, after UK highways case – OUT-LAW.com

Posted January 14th, 2019 in appeals, interpretation, limitations, news, roads, Supreme Court by tracey

‘A recent UK Supreme Court decision on the common law meaning of ‘highway’ will have significant implications for property developers, an expert has said.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 11th January 2018

Source: www.out-law.com

Court orders insurer to cover negligent solicitors’ unpaid costs – Legal Futures

Posted January 14th, 2019 in appeals, costs, indemnities, insurance, law firms, negligence, news, solicitors, Supreme Court by tracey

‘The insurer of a negligent Italian law firm operating in London has been ordered to pay £3m in costs to the victims after the lawyers failed to pay up.’

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Legal Futures, 14th January 2018

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

Adam Tucker: Parliamentary Intention, Anisminic, and the Privacy International Case (Part One) – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘Earlier this month, the Supreme Court heard argument in R (Privacy International) v Investigatory Powers Tribunal. This litigation has already attracted substantial scholarly attention in the published literature (notably in articles by Paul Scott and Tom Hickman in Public Law) and online (including a symposium at the Administrative Law in the Common Law World blog). In this two-part post, I seek to situate the case in its wider constitutional context, and argue that the Supreme Court ought to abandon the narrow approach the courts have adopted so far.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 18th December 2018

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org