Benkharbouche: EU Law reigns supreme (for now) & other important lessons – Cloisters

‘The legal press has mostly viewed Benkharbouche v SOS for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs [2017] UKSC 62 in the Supreme Court [“SC”] as a case which simply addresses the interplay between State Immunity and the Employment Tribunals. But, the other significance to this case is that it contains commentary the on the supremacy of EU Law, the role and significance of the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the EU (“CFREU”) and the way in which it confers a free standing route to dis-applying primary legislation as well as raising questions on the impact of Brexit. It follows that it is essential reading for employment lawyers. Jacques Algazy QC analyses these issues in this blog.’

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Cloisters, 2nd November 2017

Source: www.cloisters.com

R (HC) v SSWP – Arden Chambers

Posted November 23rd, 2017 in appeals, carers, news, social security, Supreme Court by sally

‘The Supreme Court has held that legislation designed to limit the rights of Zambrano carers to claim certain types of social assistance, including assistance under Pt 7, Housing Act 1996, was lawful.’

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Arden Chambers, 15th November 2017

Source: www.ardenchambers.com

Rule of law in UK at risk after Brexit, says former supreme court president – The Guardian

‘The legal implications of leaving the EU have not been thought through, could overwhelm the supreme court and endanger the independence of the British judiciary, four senior retired judges have warned.’

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The Guardian, 21st November 2017

Source: www.theguardian.com

Tagging requirements in SOPOs are lawful – UK Police Law Blog

‘In R (on the application of Richards) v Chief Constable of Cleveland Police (UKSC 2017/0090) the Supreme Court has refused permission to appeal against the imposition of a tagging requirement in a Sexual Offences Prevention Order (“SOPO”). The undisturbed judgment of the Court of Appeal in R (on the application of Richards) v Teesside Magistrates’ Court [2015] EWCA Civ 7; [2015] 1 WLR 1695 endorses (and perhaps extends) the purpose and effect of imposing qualified restrictions on sex offenders.’

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UK Police Law Blog, 19th November 2017

Source: ukpolicelawblog.com

Supreme Court rejects appeal by Zambrano carer over provision – Local Government Lawyer

Posted November 17th, 2017 in benefits, carers, children, EC law, housing, human rights, news, Supreme Court by tracey

‘The Supreme Court has this week rejected a claim that the denial of mainstream welfare and housing provision to a Zambrano carer and her child was unlawful.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 17th November 2017

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Regulators can be taken to employment tribunals, Supreme Court rules – Law Society’s Gazette

‘Solicitors claiming wrongful dismissal can potentially hold the Solicitors Regulation Authority to account in the employment tribunal following a Supreme Court judgment which clarifies rules on bringing complaints against qualifications bodies. The long-running case Michalak v General Medical Council and others centred on a discrimination complaint brought against the medical regulator by Dr Ewa Michalak. The SRA intervened in support of the GMC.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 3rd November 2017

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Gosh! Where has Ghosh gone? – White Collar Crime Blog

Posted November 2nd, 2017 in appeals, jury directions, misrepresentation, news, Supreme Court by tracey

‘Ivey (Appellant) v Genting Casinos (UK) Ltd t/a Crockfords (Respondent) [2017] UKSC 67 On appeal from [2016] EWCA Civ 1093. The Supreme Court has today unanimously declared that the second stage of the Ghosh test of dishonesty does not correctly represent the law, and that directions based upon it ought no longer to be given by judges to juries.’

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White Collar Crime Blog, 28th October 2017

Source: www.2harecourt.com

Lord Reed at the Centre for Private Law, University of Edinburgh – Supreme Court

Posted November 2nd, 2017 in foreign jurisdictions, judges, judiciary, speeches, Supreme Court by tracey

‘Lord Reed at the Centre for Private Law, University of Edinburgh: Comparative Law in the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom, 13 October 2017.’

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Supreme Court, 13th October 2017

Source: www.supremecourt.uk

Alison Young: Benkharbouche and the Future of Disapplication – UK Constitutional Law Association

Posted October 26th, 2017 in bills, conflict of laws, EC law, jurisdiction, news, Supreme Court, working time by sally

‘Last week, Lord Sumption delivered the majority decision of the Supreme Court on Benkharbouche v Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs: Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs and Libya v Janah. The case would have been heard in December of last year, but for the small matter of Miller, which caused the hearing to be moved to June of this year. Brexit and Miller, however, do not only seem to have affected the timing of the hearing. They have also affected its importance. What might have been originally anticipated as a potentially defining moment – where the Supreme Court confirmed that the EU’s Charter of Fundamental Rights and Freedoms could be used as a stand-alone cause of action to disapply primary legislation and explained how this could be achieved – was translated into an almost blasé statement by the court that ‘a conflict between EU law and English domestic law must be resolved in favour of the former, with the latter being disapplied; whereas the remedy in the case of inconsistency with Article 6 of the Human Rights Convention is a declaration of incompatibility.’ What might once have seemed controversial has become run of the mill. What has led to the casual acceptance of ‘disapplication’ of a UK statute; and what will happen to disapplication – and the Charter – post-Brexit?’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 24th October 2017

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

‘Battle of the dictionaries’ ends in victory for casino as court rules star poker player cheated to win £7.7m – Daily Telegraph

Posted October 26th, 2017 in gambling, news, Supreme Court by sally

‘It’s a case that has been dubbed the Battle of the Dictionaries.

A casino and a punter’s long legal wrangle over the definition of “to cheat” ended in the Supreme Court yesterday as victory was awarded to the gambling firm.’

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Daily Telegraph, 25th October 2017

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Black former Met officer wins right to sue for discrimination – The Guardian

‘Supreme court ruling hailed as gamechanger by Race4Justice, which says professionals in many fields will now get full protection of equality legislation.’

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The Guardian, 25th October 2017

Source: www.theguardian.com

Supreme Court dismisses top poker player’s bid to recover £7.7m winnings from London casino – Daily Telegraph

Posted October 25th, 2017 in gambling, news, Supreme Court by michael

‘The 40-year-old American has been fighting to recover the money since successfully playing a version of baccarat known as Punto Banco at Crockfords Club in Mayfair in 2012.’

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Daily Telegraph, 25th October 2017

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Supreme Court: local authority ‘vicariously liable’ for abuse of child in foster care – OUT-LAW.com

‘A local authority has been held vicariously liable for the abuse of a woman by two sets of foster parents she was placed with as a child, despite not being negligent in its selection or supervision of the foster parents.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 20th October 2017

Source: www.out-law.com

Councils face rise in claims after Supreme Court rules on foster abuse liability – Local Government Lawyer

Posted October 19th, 2017 in appeals, fostering, local government, news, Supreme Court, vicarious liability by tracey

‘Local authorities face a significant increase in claims after a majority of the Supreme Court ruled that councils can be held vicariously liable for wrongful actions of foster parents to a child in foster care.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 18th October 2017

Source: localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Domestic workers win supreme court case against Saudi diplomat – The Guardian

Posted October 19th, 2017 in appeals, diplomats, immunity, news, Supreme Court, trafficking in human beings by tracey

‘Two domestic workers who say they were exploited by a Saudi diplomat in London have won a major victory in the supreme court after judges ruled that their employer was no longer protected by diplomatic immunity.’

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The Guardian, 18th October 2017

Source: www.theguardian.com

Foster care abuse victim in ‘landmark’ win against council – BBC News

‘A woman who was abused as a child by her foster parents has won a Supreme Court battle against the local authority responsible for her care.’

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BBC News, 18th October 2017

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Supreme Court to consider if NHS in breach over man who left A&E before triage – Local Government Lawyer

Posted October 12th, 2017 in appeals, duty of care, health, hospitals, medical treatment, news, Supreme Court by sally

‘The Supreme Court has agreed to hear an appeal over a Court of Appeal ruling that the NHS was not in breach of its duty when a man left an accident and emergency department and subsequently suffered brain damage.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 10th October 2017

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Brenda Hale sworn in as first female president of UK’s supreme court – The Guardian

Posted October 3rd, 2017 in diversity, judiciary, news, Supreme Court, women by sally

‘Brenda Hale, the first female president of the supreme court, and Sir Ian Burnett, the youngest lord chief justice for 50 years, have been sworn in at the opening of the legal year.’

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The Guardian, 2nd October 2017

Source: www.theguardian.com

Supreme Court to consider legal standard on adequacy of reasons in planning – Local Government Lawyer

Posted October 2nd, 2017 in judicial review, local government, news, planning, reasons, standards, Supreme Court by sally

‘The Supreme Court will next month consider the correct legal standard to be applied in assessing the adequacy of reasons provided by local planning authorities when granting planning permission.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 29th September 2017

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Fee change: all change? – New Law Journal

‘Alex Hawley reflects on the rise in anti-austerity sentiment & the possible impact of the Unison judgment on civil court fees.’

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New Law Journal, 15th September 2017

Source: www.newlawjournal.co.uk