New Judgment: Barton and others v Morris and another in place of Gwyn-Jones (deceased) [2022] UKSC 3 – UKSC Blog

Posted January 26th, 2023 in contracts, estate agents, fees, news, sale of land, Supreme Court by sally

‘Foxpace Limited (“Foxpace”), the Fourth Respondent, owned a property known as Nash House in London. This appeal concerns an oral agreement between Foxpace and Mr Barton, the First Respondent, about Nash House. In the High Court it was held that Foxpace agreed to pay Mr Barton £1.2 million if he introduced a purchaser for Nash House who bought it for £6.5 million. The £1.2 million represented deposits and other expenses that Mr Barton had lost on two previous attempts to buy Nash House.’

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UKSC Blog, 25th January 2023

Source: ukscblog.com

Court bid to protect tenants from ‘ghost landlords’ – BBC News

‘Housing campaigners hope a Supreme Court ruling to legally define who should be deemed a landlord will help protect tenants in some of England’s worst rental properties.’

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BBC News, 26th January 2023

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Case Comment: DCM (Optical Holdings) Ltd v Commissioners for His Majesty’s Revenue and Customs [2022] UKSC 26 – UKSC Blog

Posted January 24th, 2023 in amendments, news, repayment, Scotland, Supreme Court, taxation, time limits by sally

‘In this post, Neal Chandru, an Associate in the Tax team at CMS, comments on the case of DCM (Optical Holdings) Ltd (“DCM”) v Commissioners for his Majesty’s Revenue and Customs (“HMRC”) [2022] UKSC 26 – handed down on 12 October 2022.’

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UKSC Blog, 23rd January 2023

Source: ukscblog.com

New Judgment: McCue (as guardian for Andrew McCue)(AP) v Glasgow City Council (Scotland) [2023] UKSC 1 – UKSC Blog

Posted January 12th, 2023 in community care, disabled persons, news, Scotland, social services, Supreme Court by sally

‘This appeal is concerned with the provision of community care services to disabled persons pursuant to the Social Work (Scotland) Act 1968 (the “1968 Act”) and the charges made for such provision.’

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UKSC Blog, 11th January 2023

Source: ukscblog.com

Case Comment: Khan v Meadows [2021] UKSC 21 – UKSC Blog

‘In this post Rebecca Khan, a Legal Support Assistant at Matrix Chambers, comments on the case of Khan v Meadows [2021] UKSC 21 – handed down on the 18th of June 2021. This appeal raised important questions about the application of the scope of duty principle in clinical negligence cases. The judgment is handed down together with the court’s judgment in Manchester Building Society v Grant Thornton UK LLP [2021] UKSC 20.’

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UKSC Blog, 4th January 2023

Source: ukscblog.com

Council loses Supreme Court appeal over planning conditions and dedication of land as public highway – Local Government Lawyer

Posted December 16th, 2022 in appeals, local government, news, planning, roads, Supreme Court by tracey

‘The Supreme Court has unanimously dismissed an appeal by Swindon Borough Council in a dispute over whether it is lawful for a planning authority, in granting planning permission for a development, to impose a planning condition that the developer will dedicate land within the development site to be a public highway.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 14th December 2022

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Protest and proportionality in the Supreme Court: The Safe Access Zones Bill Reference [2022] UKSC 32 – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted December 15th, 2022 in abortion, bills, devolution issues, harassment, news, Northern Ireland, Supreme Court by tracey

‘Abortion in Northern Ireland has had a fraught and frequently distressing history. Until 2019 when the UK Parliament reformed the law, the jurisdiction had the most restrictive approach to abortion in the UK. But even this reform has not reformed the reality, either for those seeking abortion services or information and counselling on such services or for those who work at providers of such services lawfully. I have previously written about the situation as it stood in March 2021, and the reality has changed little since then, with two notable exceptions. In March 2022, the Northern Ireland Assembly passed the Abortion Services (Safe Access Zones) Bill (Northern Ireland) (“SAZ Bill”) to create buffer zones around lawful abortion providers, in an attempt to criminalise the harassment and intimidation of people who seek or work in such places. On 2 December 2022, tired of the glacial pace and political controversy in commissioning abortion services, the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland moved to commission such services himself. In the interim, the Attorney General for Northern Ireland (“AGNI”) referred the SAZ Bill to the UK Supreme Court to determine whether it was lawful.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 14th December 2022

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Case Comment: Guest v Guest [2022] UKSC 27 – UKSC Blog

Posted December 14th, 2022 in appeals, estoppel, news, Supreme Court, wills by sally

‘In this post, Tobias Seger, an Associate at CMS, comments on the Supreme Court’s decision in Guest v Guest [2022] UKSC 27, handed down by the Supreme Court on 19 October 2022. This case concerns the proper approach to granting relief under the doctrine of proprietary estoppel.’

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UKSC Blog, 12th December 2022

Source: ukscblog.com

Case Preview: R (Day) v Shropshire Council (heard 7th December 2022) – UKSC Blog

Posted December 14th, 2022 in appeals, judicial review, local government, news, planning, Supreme Court by sally

‘Shrewsbury Town Council owned a plot of land which was subject to a statutory trust arising either under section 10 of the Open Spaces Act 1906 or, impliedly, under the Public Health Act 1875. Pursuant to that trust, the town council had to allow the public to enjoy the land as an open space.’

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UKSC Blog, 12th December 2022

Source: ukscblog.com

Chris Himsworth: Referendum Bill Consequentials – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘At paras 56-57 of their judgment, the court in Reference by the Lord Advocate of devolution issues ([2022] UKSC 31) declared: “The central issue is whether legislation for a referendum on Scottish independence would relate to a reserved matter…. The critical question is accordingly whether the proposed Bill would relate to the Union of the Kingdoms of Scotland and England or the Parliament of the United Kingdom”.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 29th November 2022

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

New Judgment: Reference by the Lord Advocate of devolution issues under paragraph 34 of Schedule 6 to the Scotland Act 1998 [2022] UKSC 31 – UKSC Blog

‘The Scottish Government drafted a Scottish Independence Referendum Bill which makes provision for a referendum on the question, “Should Scotland be an independent country?”. Under the Scotland Act 1998 (“the Scotland Act”), the power of the Scottish Parliament to make legislation (or its “legislative competence”) is limited. A provision of a Bill will be outside the legislative competence of the Scottish Parliament and therefore not law if it relates to the matters which have been reserved to the United Kingdom Parliament in Westminster (sections 29(1) and (2)(b)). These reserved matters include “the Union of the Kingdoms of Scotland and England” and “the Parliament of the United Kingdom” (Schedule 5, paragraphs 1(b) and (c)).’

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UKSC Blog, 23rd November 2022

Source: ukscblog.com

Supreme court rules against Scottish parliament holding new independence referendum – The Guardian

‘The Scottish parliament cannot hold a second independence referendum without Westminster approval, the UK supreme court has ruled, in a unanimous judgment likely to anger Scottish nationalists who say the country’s future is for Scottish voters to decide.’

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The Guardian, 23rd November 2022

Source: www.theguardian.com

What is the supreme court’s Scottish independence ruling about? – The Guardian

‘All you need to know about decision on whether Scotland can hold new referendum without Westminster approval.’

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The Guardian, 23rd November 2022

Source: www.theguardian.com

Hillside Parks – common sense is not that common (but the law is not an ass) – Local Government Lawyer

Posted November 21st, 2022 in appeals, housing, local government, news, planning, Supreme Court by tracey

‘The Supreme Court judgment in Hillside Parks shows that common sense helps operate the planning system in a practical and fair way, Roy Pinnock writes.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 18th November 2022

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Supreme Court to rule on indyref2 powers next week – BBC News

Posted November 16th, 2022 in devolution issues, news, parliament, referendums, Scotland, Supreme Court by sally

‘The Supreme Court will deliver its judgement next Wednesday on whether the Scottish Parliament can hold a second independence referendum without Westminster’s approval.’

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BBC News, 16th November 2022

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Call for planning permission variations reform after Hillside ruling – OUT-LAW.com

Posted November 4th, 2022 in appeals, housing, local government, news, planning, Supreme Court, Wales by tracey

‘Planning law in England should be updated to avoid a situation where the original planning permission granted to a site is invalidated by departures from the original approved plans because subsequent planning permissions granted for development within that site have made compliance with the original scheme physically impossible, an expert has said.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 3rd November 2022

Source: www.pinsentmasons.com

Developer loses Supreme Court battle over implementation of successive planning permissions – Local Government Lawyer

Posted November 4th, 2022 in appeals, housing, local government, news, planning, Supreme Court by tracey

‘The Supreme Court has unanimously dismissed an appeal by a developer in a dispute with a national park authority over the implementation of successive planning permissions.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 3rd November 2022

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Case Preview: News Corp UK & Ireland Limited v Commissioners for His Majesty’s Revenue and Customs – UKSC Blog

Posted November 2nd, 2022 in appeals, HM Revenue & Customs, media, news, Supreme Court, taxation, VAT by sally

‘In this post, Jack Prytherch, Of Counsel in the Tax team at CMS, previews the case of News Corp UK & Ireland Limited v Commissioners for His Majesty’s Revenue and Customs, which is scheduled to be heard on 22 and 23 November 2022.’

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UKSC Blog, 31st October 2022

Source: ukscblog.com

Good faith: reliance on the repugnant – Practical Law: Construction Blog

Posted October 21st, 2022 in appeals, construction industry, contracts, news, Supreme Court by tracey

‘English law has, to put it mildly, a fractious relationship with the concept of good faith. There is a deep-rooted scepticism towards it that has often manifested as outright hostility: Lord Ackner famously described the duty to negotiate in good faith as “inherently repugnant to the adversarial position of the parties” (Walford v Miles). Indeed, the Supreme Court has recently confirmed that there is no general principle of good faith in English law (Times Travel (UK) Ltd and another v Pakistan International Airlines Corp).’

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Practical Law: Construction Blog , 19th October 2022

Source: constructionblog.practicallaw.com

New Judgment: Commissioners for His Majesty’s Revenue and Customs v NHS Lothian Health Board (Scotland) 2022 UKSC [28] – UKSC Blog

Posted October 20th, 2022 in burden of proof, EC law, evidence, news, Scotland, standard of proof, Supreme Court, VAT by sally

‘This appeal concerns the correct approach to evidence and the burden and standard of proof in the context of historic claims for the recovery of input Value Added Tax (“VAT”). Input tax is the VAT incurred when the taxpayer buys in supplies which it uses for the purpose of a business activity.’

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UKSC Blog, 19th October 2022

Source: ukscblog.com