Supreme Court lowers the bar – Law Society’s Gazette

‘On 11 December, in a long-awaited judgment (and in perhaps unique circumstances), the Supreme Court dismissed Mastercard’s appeal in the “gargantuan” collective action brought by Walter Merricks CBE. In doing so, the court has markedly lowered the bar to be applied at the certification stage for competition collective actions. This judgment will have a significant impact on collective actions – which are still in their relative infancy – for years to come. Merricks’ claim will now return to the Competition Appeal Tribunal (CAT), which will decide again (now with clear guidance from the Supreme Court) whether to certify the claim by granting a collective proceedings order (CPO).’

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Law Society's Gazette, 11th January 2021

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

David Feldman: Departing from Retained EU Case law – UK Constitutional Law Association

Posted January 12th, 2021 in brexit, EC law, judiciary, news, practice directions, precedent, Supreme Court by sally

‘Following the end of the UK’s transition period for withdrawing from the EU, the status of earlier case law on retained EU law is somewhat complicated. Section 6(3) and (4)(a) and (b) of the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018, as amended by the European Union (Withdrawal Agreement) Act 2020, provides that the Supreme Court and in criminal matters the High Court of Justiciary are not to be bound by any retained EU case law, but other courts and tribunals are to determine issues of retained EU law in accordance with retained EU case law. In relation to certain aspects of competition law, section 60A(7) of the Competition Act 1998, inserted by reg. 23 of the Competition (Amendments etc.) (EU Exit) Regulations 2019, SI 93 of 2019, provides that any court or tribunal, the Competition and Markets Authority, and anyone acting on behalf of the Authority, may depart from retained EU case law. In addition, section 6(5A) of the 2018 Act allows regulations to be made to designate other courts and tribunals as “relevant courts” or “relevant tribunals” which, by virtue of section 6(4)(ba), are not to be bound by retained EU case law to the extent specified in the regulations.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 11th January 2021

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

Barrister broke Supreme Court embargo in “act of civil disobedience” – Litigation Futures

‘A barrister broke the embargo on today’s Supreme Court ruling on the Heathrow airport expansion case “as an act of civil disobedience”.’

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Litigation Futures, 16th December 2020

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

Top UK court overturns block on Heathrow’s third runway – The Guardian

Posted December 17th, 2020 in airports, environmental protection, news, planning, Supreme Court by tracey

‘The Supreme Court has overturned a February judgment that a third runway at Heathrow airport was illegal. It means the project can now seek planning permission, but the ultimate completion of the runway remains uncertain.’

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The Guardian, 16th December 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

No business interruption decision from Supreme Court until next year – Law Society’s Gazette

‘Judgment in an urgent test case to determine whether businesses hit by Covid-19 will receive insurance pay-outs will not be handed down by the Supreme Court until January at the earliest. Five Supreme Court justices heard a case between the Financial Conduct Authority and six insurance companies in November. The dispute concerned business interruption insurance (BII) and the court was asked to rule on provisions in insurance policies relating to disease clauses, prevention of access clauses and hybrid clauses.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 15th December 2020

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Top UK court overturns block on Heathrow’s third runway – The Guardian

Posted December 16th, 2020 in airports, appeals, climate change, environmental protection, news, planning, Supreme Court by tracey

‘The Supreme Court has overturned a February judgment that a third runway at Heathrow airport was illegal. It means the project can now seek planning permission, but the ultimate completion of the runway remains uncertain.’

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The Guardian, 16th December 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Collective Actions in the Supreme Court – Competition Bulletin from Blackstone Chambers

‘The big news from today’s UK Supreme Court collective action decision in Mastercard v Merricks [2020] UKSC 51 is not only that Mr Merricks won and defeated the appeal, but that the Supreme Court approached the issues in a far more claimant-friendly way than even the Court of Appeal had done.’

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Competition Bulletin from Blackstone Chambers, 11th December 2020

Source: competitionbulletin.com

Mastercard judgment ‘lowers bar’ for collective action – Law Society’s Gazette

‘The Supreme Court’s ruling against Mastercard will make it easier for group damages claims to proceed to trial, commentators have said. However, the card issuer’s solicitors have stressed the “very unusual circumstances” of the judgment, in which justices were divided on key issues.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 11th December 2020

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Financial Remedy Update, December 2020 – Family Law Week

‘Sue Brookes Principal Associate, Family Lawyer, Collaborative Lawyer and Mediator for Mills & Reeve LLP considers the important news and case law relating to financial remedies and divorce during November 2020.’

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Family Law Week, 10th December 2020

Source: www.familylawweek.co.uk

Case Comment: Shagang Shipping Company Ltd (in liquidation) v HNA Group Company Ltd [2020] UKSC 34 – UKSC Blog

Posted December 9th, 2020 in appeals, bribery, charterparties, evidence, news, Supreme Court, torture by sally

‘On 5 August 2020, the UK Supreme Court handed down judgment in Shagang Shipping Company Ltd (in liquidation) v HNA Group Company Ltd [2020] UKSC 34; [2020] 1 W.L.R. 3549. Against the background of a commercial charterparty dispute, this appeal raised important questions about the admissibility of evidence potentially obtained through torture.’

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UKSC Blog, 8th December 2020

Source: ukscblog.com

New Judgment: R (on the application of Gourlay) v Parole Board [2020] UKSC 50 – UKSC Blog

Posted December 7th, 2020 in appeals, costs, judicial review, news, parole, prisons, Supreme Court by sally

‘The Supreme Court has unanimously dismissed this appeal concerning the role of the Court in relation to the principles governing the award of costs in lower courts.’

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UKSC Blog, 4th December 2020

Source: ukscblog.com

The law applicable to an arbitration agreement: Part 1 of our analysis of Enka v OOO Insurance – Hardwicke Chambers

‘In the eagerly awaited judgment in Enka Insaat Ve Sanayi AS v OOO Insurance Company Chubb [2020] UKSC 38, the Supreme Court finally settled an important issue in the law of arbitration that has long divided the authorities and commentary: in the absence of a choice by the parties, where the law applicable to the main contract differs from that of the seat, it is the law of the seat that governs the validity and scope of the arbitration agreement. Our Overview on the decision sets out the key holdings; Part I (below) of our commentary on the decision examines the reasoning of the Majority in greater depth.’

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Hardwicke Chambers, 2nd December 2020

Source: hardwicke.co.uk

Intervening but overcrowded accommodation – Nearly Legal

Posted December 3rd, 2020 in appeals, homelessness, housing, local government, news, Supreme Court by tracey

‘Bullale v City of Westminster Council [2020] EWCA Civ 1587. An important Court of Appeal judgment on when intervening accommodation is settled so as to end the effect of a previous finding of intentional homelessness, including a careful revision of Doka v Southwark London Borough Council [2017] H.L.R. 786 (our report here) in view of the Supreme Court’s statement when refusing permission to appeal.’

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Nearly Legal, 1st December 2020

Source: nearlylegal.co.uk

Nicholas Reed Langen: Reforming the Supreme Court – UK Constitutional Law Association

Posted December 3rd, 2020 in constitutional law, diversity, judiciary, news, Supreme Court by tracey

‘Fresh from inaugurating its Independent Review of Administrative Law, this government is still not finished with the judiciary, at least according to recent policy proposals leaked to the Sunday Telegraph. Downing Street has also turned its eye onto the Supreme Court and its structure and composition.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 1st December 2020

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

New criminal record disclosure rules take effect – UK Human Rights Blog

‘On the 28th November 2020, The Police Act 1997 (Criminal Record Certificates: Relevant Matters) (Amendment) (England and Wales) Order 2020 (“the Order”) came into force, implementing important changes to the criminal records disclosure rules in England and Wales.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 1st December 2020

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

International community “will see Halliburton ruling as protecting Bar” – Litigation Futures

‘The Supreme Court’s decision not to remove a QC from an arbitration will reinforce the international perception that members of the English Bar are being protected, a solicitor has claimed.’

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Litigation Futures, 30th November 2020

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

New Judgment: Halliburton Company v Chubb Bermuda Insurance Ltd (Formerly known as Ace Bermuda Insurance Ltd) [2020] UKSC 48 – UKSC Blog

‘The Supreme Court has unanimously dismissed this appeal addressing when an arbitrator should make disclosure of circumstances which may give rise to justifiable doubts as to his impartiality.’

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UKSC Blog, 27th November 2020

Source: ukscblog.com

New Judgment: Commissioners for Her Majesty’s Revenue & Customs v London Clubs Management Ltd [2020] UKSC 49 – UKSC Blog

Posted November 30th, 2020 in appeals, gambling, news, statutory interpretation, Supreme Court by sally

‘The Supreme Court has unanimously dismissed this appeal concerning the correct approach as to determining the value of non-negotiable chips for the purpose of calculating gaming duty.’

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UKSC Blog, 27th November 2020

Source: ukscblog.com

Successful insurers’ A1P1 claim concerning benefits reimbursement in asbestos claims – UK Human Rights Blog

‘R (o.t.a of Aviva & Swiss Re) v. Secretary of State for Work and Pensions [2020] EWHC 3118 (Admin). At first sight, a rather abstruse dispute, but the 63 page judgment of Henshaw J gives rise to a host of important and difficult human rights points. But his central conclusion is that a statute which was not challengeable at the time of its enactment became so, because of the subsequent evolution of the law, principally common law, to the detriment of insurers.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 25th November 2020

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Supreme Court reduces standard of proof for suicide and unlawful killing in inquest conclusions – Park Square Barristers

‘The Supreme Court has on 13 November 2020 handed down the judgment in this case concerning the appropriate standard of proof for conclusions at inquests.’

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Park Square Barristers, 13th November 2020

Source: www.parksquarebarristers.co.uk