Men jailed over huge £100m tax fraud – Crown Prosecution Service

‘Five men have been jailed today (November 10) for their part in a £100m tax fraud.’

Full Story

Crown Prosecution Service, 10th November 2017

Source: www.cps.gov.uk

Surrogacy and HFEA Update (November 2017) – Family Law Week

‘Andrew Powell, barrister of 4 Paper Buildings, considers recent developments relating to surrogacy law as well as the latest cases concerning administrative errors and the HFEA.’

Full Story

Family Law Week, 7th November 2017

Source: www.familylawweek.co.uk

Judicial review appeal fails in UK diverted profits tax case – OUT-LAW.com

‘Oil and gas distributing company Glencore Energy’s application for judicial review of the issue of a diverted profits tax (DPT) charging notice by HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) has been rejected for a second time.’

Full Story

OUT-LAW.com, 3rd November 2017

Source: www.out-law.com

Lord Reed at the Centre for Private Law, University of Edinburgh – Supreme Court

Posted November 2nd, 2017 in foreign jurisdictions, judges, judiciary, speeches, Supreme Court by tracey

‘Lord Reed at the Centre for Private Law, University of Edinburgh: Comparative Law in the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom, 13 October 2017.’

Full speech

Supreme Court, 13th October 2017

Source: www.supremecourt.uk

From Russia with love: the latest word on Part III MFPA 1984 Claims – Family Law Week

Posted November 2nd, 2017 in delay, divorce, financial provision, foreign jurisdictions, jurisdiction, news by tracey

‘Byron James, barrister, Expatriate Law (based in the United Arab Emirates) considers the recent guidance from the Court of Appeal in relation to applications made under Part III of the Matrimonial and Family Proceedings Act 1984.’

Full Story

Family Law Week, 27th October 2017

Source: www.familylawweek.co.uk

Most organisations are unclear about data storage and transfer arrangements, say privacy watchdogs – OUT-LAW.com

‘Most privacy notices displayed on websites and mobile apps do not explain to consumers the country in which collected personal data is stored, according to a study carried out by data protection authorities based around the world.’

Full Story

OUT-LAW.com, 26th October 2017

Source: www.out-law.com

British couple given lengthy jail terms for child sexual abuse – The Guardian

‘A British couple who abused a child and streamed the assaults live are beginning lengthy jail terms after a fellow paedophile who watched online from the US gave evidence against them.’

Full Story

The Guardian, 27th October 2017

Source: www.theguardian.com

Lump sum orders under Pt III of MFPA 1984 – Family Law

‘Family analysis: A husband’s appeal succeeded against a lump sum order made in favour of the wife by an English court after the couple agreed a financial consent order in Russian divorce proceedings. Jenny Duggan, associate at Stewarts, examines issues that arose in Zimina v Zimin.’

Full Story

Family Law, 27th October 2017

Source: www.familylaw.co.uk

Catalonia: The Right to Secede and the Right to Self-Determination – Oxford Human Rights Hub

Posted October 24th, 2017 in constitutional law, devolution, foreign jurisdictions, news by sally

‘In an address to the Parliament of Catalonia on 10th October 2017, the President of Catalonia issued a ‘suspended’ unilateral declaration of independence (“UDI”) from Spain. The ‘suspended’ UDI followed a controversial independence referendum on 1st October 2017. The referendum, which was mired by protests and attempts by federal police forces to prevent people from voting, had resulted in a vote of 90% in favour of independence with a reported 42% turn-out.’

Full Story

Oxford Human Rights Hub, 23rd October 2017

Source: ohrh.law.ox.ac.uk

Copyright in Photographs – Pablo Star Media Ltd v Bowen – NIPC Law

‘The infringement that was the subject of the appeal was the lifting of a fragment of a photo of the great man’s wedding photo in 1937 from the VisitWales.com website and its reuse on a website that advertises holiday cottages in Wales. Liability was not contested so the hearing before Deputy District Judge Vary was an assessment of damages only. According to paragraph [7] of Judge Hacon’s judgment, the learned deputy district judge awarded £250 on the user principle and declined to award additional damages under s.97 (2) of the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 (“the CDPA”). He ordered the copyright owner to pay the infringer’s travelling expenses on the ground that the claimant had failed in its obligation under CPR 1.3 to help the court further the overriding objective by bringing proceedings in the Irish Republic for infringement of the corresponding Irish copyright and threatening similar proceedings in the USA to maximize cost and pressure on the defendant to settle.’

Full Story

NIPC Law, 15th October 2017

Source: nipclaw.blogspot.co.uk

Brexit and the Irish Bar – Brexit Law

‘The Brexit vote has opened a Pandora’s box of uncertainties for UK lawyers, not least the issue of how leaving will affect their rights to practise in the EU.’

Full Story

Brexit Law, 6th October 2017

Source: brexit.law

British courts may unlock secrets of how Trump campaign profiled US voters – The Guardian

Posted October 2nd, 2017 in data protection, foreign jurisdictions, internet, news, privacy by sally

‘Legal mechanism may help academic expose how Big Data firms like Cambridge Analytica and Facebook get their information.’

Full Story

The Guardian, 1st October 2017

Source: www.theguardian.com

Crime agency admits acting illegally in death penalty case – Law Society’s Gazette

‘The National Crime Agency (NCA) has admitted acting unlawfully in assisting Thai police investigate, arrest and convict two Burmese men sentenced to death for the murder of two British backpackers. Campaigners against the death penalty said the disclosure raises questions about the UK cooperation with authorities in countries with dubious human rights records.’

Full Story

Law Society's Gazette, 30th August 2017

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

UK police broke law in case of British backpackers murdered in Thailand – The Guardian

‘The National Crime Agency in the UK has been forced to admit it acted unlawfully when it gave information to Thai police that helped send two men to death row for murdering two British backpackers.’

Full Story

The Guardian, 29th August 2017

Source: www.theguardian.com

Litigators evenly split on impact of Brexit – Litigation Futures

‘Litigation lawyers in London are fairly evenly split on whether Brexit will lead to a “significant flight of work” to other jurisdictions, a survey has found.’

Full Story

Litigation Futures, 31st July 2017

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

Paedophile who encouraged abuse of boy in America jailed – Crown Prosecution Service

‘A paedophile who encouraged the abuse of a young boy in America from his computer in Wales has been jailed today (July 12).’

Full Story

Crown Prosecution Service, 12th July 2017

Source: www.cps.gov.uk

Nicholas Goodfellow on Challenging the Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards – Littleton Chambers

‘The Commercial Court has recently considered the principles relating to the refusal to enforce a foreign arbitral award on grounds of fraud: Stati and others v The Republic of Kazakhstan [2017] EWHC 1348 (Comm), a decision of Knowles J, writes Nicholas Goodfellow.’

Full Story

Littleton Chambers, 19th June 2017

Source: www.littletonchambers.com

The UK Jurisdictions After 2019 – Sir Geoffrey Vos, Chancellor of the High Court

The UK Jurisdictions After 2019 (PDF)

Sir Geoffrey Vos, Chancellor of the High Court

Lecture to the Faculty of Advocates, 20th June 2017

Source: www.judiciary.gov.uk

Rise in anti money laundering inquiries poses challenge for banks, says expert – OUT-LAW.com

‘Requests from foreign authorities for the UK’s assistance in anti money laundering (AML) investigations rose last year to record levels.’

Full Story

OUT-LAW.com, 12th June 2017

Source: www.out-law.com

Implementing the GDPR in the UK: lessons from Germany? – Panopticon

Posted May 10th, 2017 in data protection, EC law, foreign jurisdictions, news, regulations by sally

‘As we all know, the GDPR is all about the harmonisation of data protection across Europe – hence its form as a regulation (directly effective) rather than a directive (domestic implementing legislation needed). Yes, but: the GDPR leaves an awful lot to member states to implement. For example: exemptions to data subjects’ rights, mechanisms for reconciling data protection and freedom of expression, and the machinery of enforcement by supervisory authorities. Until we have domestic implementing legislation, we can’t fully understand how data protection will work after 25 May 2018.’

Full story

Panopticon, 9th May 2017

Source: www.panopticonblog.com