Brexit and implications for UK Merger Control – Part 3/3: Managing and prioritising the CMA’s mergers workload – Competition Bulletin from Blackstone Chambers

Posted May 16th, 2017 in competition, EC law, mergers, news, treaties by sally

‘The Competition Bulletin is pleased to welcome the third in a three-part series of blogs on Brexit and merger control by Ben Forbes and Mat Hughes of AlixPartners. Ben and Mat are (with others) co-authors of the new Sweet & Maxwell book, “UK Merger Control: Law and Practice”.’

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Competition Bulletin from Blackstone Chambers, 16th May 2017

Source: www.competitionbulletin.com

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Brexit may cost MPs and peers the power to pass laws, says former judge – The Guardian

‘The “legislative tsunami” unleashed by Brexit will deliver the “greatest challenge” in history to the integrity of parliament’s procedures, a former lord chief justice has said. Lord Judge raised his concerns that by the time Brexit is completed and the “great repeal bill” enacted, MPs and peers will have effectively given away their powers to pass laws.’

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The Guardian, 3rd May 2017

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Eirik Bjorge: The Dualist System of the English Constitution and the Victorian Acquis – UK Constitutional Law Association

Posted May 2nd, 2017 in constitutional law, news, parliament, treaties by sally

‘The Supreme Court in Miller set out the model that ‘the dualist system is a necessary corollary of Parliamentary sovereignty’ (para 57), or in the words of Campbell McLachlan in his admirable Foreign Relations Law, cited by the Supreme Court:

“If treaties have no effect within domestic law, Parliament’s legislative supremacy within its own polity is secure. If the executive must always seek the sanction of Parliament in the event that a proposed action on the international plane will require domestic implementation, parliamentary sovereignty is reinforced at the very point at which the legislative power is engaged (para 5.20).”‘

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 28th April 2017

Source: www.ukconstitutionallaw.org

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London’s legal eminence will survive Brexit, LCJ insists – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted April 26th, 2017 in EC law, legal services, London, news, referendums, treaties by sally

‘Brexit will not harm London’s status as a centre for dispute resolution, the lord chief justice has assured Chinese colleagues. In a speech to the National Judges College in Beijing earlier this month and circulated by HM Judiciary today, Lord Thomas of Cwmgiedd took English contract law as an illustration of why Brexit will have ‘no effect on London’s key strengths’.’

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Law Society’s Gazette, 25th April 2017

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

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Plan to opt out of rights accords in future wars dangerous, inquiry hears – The Guardian

‘Government plans to opt out of international human rights agreements in future conflicts would be dangerous and prevent British soldiers from obtaining justice, according to evidence submitted to a parliamentary inquiry by the Law Society and Liberty.’

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The Guardian, 24th April 2017

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Gina Miller to launch tactical voting initiative against hard Brexit – The Guardian

Posted April 20th, 2017 in EC law, elections, news, parliament, political parties, treaties by sally

‘Gina Miller, the pro-EU campaigner behind a successful court challenge over article 50, is planning to launch a tactical voting initiative to support election candidates opposed to hard Brexit.’

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The Guardian, 19th April 2017

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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K M Hayne: The ‘Great Repeal Bill’ – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘In the White Paper published in February this year (“The United Kingdom’s exit from and new partnership with the European Union” Cm 9417), the very first point made was that the “Great Repeal Bill” will “remove the European Communities Act 1972 from the statute book and convert the ‘acquis’ – the body of existing EU law – into domestic law”. It was said that “[t]his means that, wherever practical and appropriate, the same rules and laws will apply on the day after [the United Kingdom] leave[s] the EU as they did before”.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 12th April 2017

Source: www.ukconstitutionallaw.org

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BREXIT: Banks told to show Brexit plans to PRA – OUT-LAW.com

Posted April 11th, 2017 in banking, EC law, financial regulation, news, treaties by sally

‘The Bank of England has written to UK financial services firms asking them to send a summary of their contingency plans for Brexit to the Prudential Regulatory Authority (PRA) by July.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 10th April 2017

Source: www.out-law.com

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Rosie Slowe: Article 50 Notice and Implied Conditionality – UK Human Rights Blog

‘More substantive than the 137 word EU (Notification of Withdrawal) Act 2017 (‘Notification Act’), which was passed by Parliament on 13 March, the Prime Minister’s 6 page letter of notice, issued under Article 50 TEU, is lacking in one crucial respect. This post asserts that, as a matter of UK constitutional law and in accordance with the EU Treaties as well as customary international law, conditionality should be inferred into this notice. Such conditionality manifests in the requirement of domestic Parliamentary approval at the end of the Article 50 negotiation process.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 7th April 2017

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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Challenges Arising from Brexit – Henderson Chambers

‘In the light of Brexit, uncertain times lie ahead! How can small businesses cope with the challenges which the withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union will necessarily entail and with the uncertainty that will persist so long as no concluded agreement(s) has/have been struck between the British Government and its EU counterparts.’

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Henderson Chambers, 5th April 2017

Source: www.hendersonchambers.co.uk

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Video Link Evidence in the Commercial Court: Potential Pitfalls – Hardwicke Chambers

‘In the 21st century commercial practitioners often approach the question of whether the court will hear evidence by video link as one of practicality. Questions they will commonly ask themselves include the following: will the witness be in London during the trial timetable? Will the witness be able to find time (and obtain consent from a current employer) to fly to London? Where physically could the video evidence be given and is that a suitable location? How sure can the court be that the witness is not receiving clandestine assistance “off-camera”? How secure is the video link and what is the sound and picture quality? Indeed in preparing a case that involves a number of witnesses who live and work overseas the possibility of live video evidence may well feature in trial preparation as a necessity rather than an option.’

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Hardwicke Chambers, 27th March 2017

Source: www.hardwicke.co.uk

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Brexit, Article 50 and what it means for innovative businesses – Technology Law Update

Posted March 29th, 2017 in data protection, EC law, news, patents, referendums, treaties by sally

‘The shock of last June’s referendum result, with the UK electorate opting to leave the European Union, is starting to fade. Now the hard graft begins. Tomorrow British Prime Minister Theresa May will trigger Article 50, starting the two year process of negotiations that will end with a deal, an untidy departure or (maybe) an agreement to keep talking. Since the first analysis of what Brexit will mean for businesses we have learned more about what the UK intends to keep and discard. How are things looking now?’

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Technology Law Update, 28th March 2017

Source: www.technology-law-blog.co.uk

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Elizabeth Campion: The Constitutional “Ripple Effect” of the European Union (Notification of Withdrawal) Act 2017 – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘Miller and others v Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union [2017] UKSC 5 was highly anticipated as perhaps the most signficant constitutional case of this generation, stirring up such strong reactions that the judges of the Divisional Court who initially decided in favour of Ms. Miller were dubbed “Enemies of the People”. Two months after a majority of an 11-member Supreme Court confirmed that prerogative powers could not be used to invoke Article 50, however, the European Union (Notification of Withdrawal) Act 2017 (hereafter referred to as the “Withdrawal Act”) received Royal Assent, conferring power on the Prime Minister to give the notification required to begin the process of the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union. The passage of the Withdrawal Act fulfilled the constitutional requirements identified in Miller formally, within the purely political timetable set by the Prime Minister at the Conservative Party’s conference and without any additional legal requirements being imposed by way of amendment. This not only sets the stage but also prepares the way for a more permanent sidelining of Parliament as the supreme legislative body in the UK’s constitution as part of the process of leaving the European Union.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 27th March 2017

Source: www.ukconstitutionallaw.org

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Article 50 triggered today: The key points, reaction and analysis – Daily Telegraph

Posted March 29th, 2017 in EC law, news, notification, referendums, treaties by sally

‘Theresa May will officially trigger Article 50 at 12.30pm today, launching two years of negotiations that will end with Brexit in 2019.’

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Daily Telegraph, 29th March 2017

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

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Brian Christopher Jones: The Government’s Quandary: “Great”, or Ordinary, Repeal – UK Constitutional Law Association

Posted March 28th, 2017 in bills, constitutional reform, drafting, EC law, legislation, news, repeals, treaties by sally

‘The government would certainly prefer a “great” repeal, but they would be wise to make it an ordinary one. Four years ago I published an analysis piece in Public Law (April 2013) about the need to prevent political language in legislation, and especially in relation to statutory titles. In short, I could find little guidance in a host of official Parliamentary and drafting documents that would curtail overtly political statutory language, and especially in the presentational aspects of bills and statutes, such as short titles. When it came down to it, if a minister desired a particular title for their Bill, they could strong-arm drafters into getting their way—although, there could be pushback from House Authorities, such as the Speaker. The most recent version of Erskine May (2011) notes that short titles must “describe the bill in a straightforwardly factual manner. An argumentative title or slogan is not permitted” (p 526). In reality, however, ministers “may for presentational reasons have strong views about the short title and the structure of the bill”, and attempt to assert their authority (Cabinet Office Guide to Making Legislation, 9.71). Indeed, it is this unique convergence of law and policy that makes the process of drafting so interesting.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 28th March 2017

Source: www.ukconstitutionallaw.org

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Christina Lienen: Why the Implications of ‘No Deal’ Are No Mere ‘Exercise in Guesswork’ – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘Theresa May is to trigger Article 50 on 29 March 2017, kicking off the two-year negotiation period during which the relationship between the UK and the EU will be redefined. On 12 March the House of Commons Foreign Affairs Committee published their ninth report of the current session: ‘Article 50 negotiations: Implications of ‘no deal’’. This is the first Select Committee publication focusing specifically on the implications faced by the UK in the event of a ‘no deal’ situation, with reference to a range of different sectors, policy areas and circumstances. Last week the concerns raised in the report as to the Government’s position or rather the apparent lack thereof regarding ‘no deal’ implications seemed to be confirmed when the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union made headlines telling the Brexit Select Committee that the Government had done no economic assessment of the possible effects of a “no deal” scenario. On 24 January 2017, similar remarks were made when Davis said that there were so many different things to assess, considering implications of ‘no deal’ would be ‘nothing more than an exercise in guesswork at this stage’. In this post I will highlight the most interesting points raised in the report which go to show that, contrary to what the Government suggests, it is actually both possible and vital to assess what areas require particular attention and what challenges this would bring. Beyond the question of ‘no deal’ implications, there are various aspects that the report touches upon which would benefit from academic discussion.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 24th March 2017

Source: www.ukconstitutionallaw.org

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UN asks UK to suspend work on Hinkley Point – The Guardian

‘A United Nations committee has asked the UK to suspend work on the Hinkley Point C nuclear power station in Somerset because of the government’s failure to consult with European countries over the project.’

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The Guardian, 20th March 2017

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Theresa May warned that Brexit is ‘heading back to the courts’ after she refuses to give MPs a ‘meaningful vote’ – The Independent

Posted March 14th, 2017 in constitutional law, constitutional reform, EC law, news, parliament, treaties by tracey

‘Theresa May has been warned that Brexit is heading back to the courts after she refused to give MPs a “meaningful vote” on any final deal.’

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The Independent, 13th March 2017

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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Brexit bill: Parliament clears way for talks with EU – BBC News

Posted March 14th, 2017 in bills, EC law, news, parliament, treaties by tracey

‘Parliament has passed the Brexit bill, paving the way for the government to trigger Article 50 so the UK can leave the European Union.’

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BBC News, 14th March 2017

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Brexit bill faces last rebel push to guarantee final vote in parliament – The Guardian

Posted March 13th, 2017 in amendments, bills, EC law, news, parliament, political parties, treaties by sally

‘The government faces a last push from rebel backbenchers to guarantee a final vote in parliament on any Brexit deal before the triggering of article 50, with concerns coalescing around what would happen if no agreement was reached with the EU.’

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The Guardian, 13th February 2017

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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