The Supreme Court’s decision in Unwired Planet – what comes next? – Competition Bulletin from Blackstone Chambers

‘The UK Supreme Court has handed down its long-awaited judgment in Unwired Planet. Its decision has profound implications for patent owners and implementers alike and is likely to lead to heavily contested jurisdictional disputes going forward.’

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Competition Bulletin from Blackstone Chambers, 15th September 2020

Source: competitionbulletin.com

The Supreme Court’s decision in Unwired Planet – what comes next? – Competition Bulletin from Blackstone Chambers

‘The UK Supreme Court has handed down its long-awaited judgment in Unwired Planet. Its decision has profound implications for patent owners and implementers alike and is likely to lead to heavily contested jurisdictional disputes going forward.’

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Competition Bulletin from Blackstone Chambers, 15th September

Source: competitionbulletin.com

‘Fair and reasonable’ telecom IP ruling is boost for UK courts – Law Society’s Gazette

‘Long-awaited Supreme Court rulings on mobile phone patents will boost the UK’s position as a forum for resolving global IP licensing disputes, specialist lawyers said today.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 26th August 2020

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

New Judgment: Unwired Planet International Ltd and another) v Huawei Technologies (UK) Co Ltd and another [2020] UKSC 37 – UKSC Blog

‘This appeal discusses whether the English court has the power or jurisdiction, or is it a proper exercise of any such power or jurisdiction without the parties’ agreement:

– to grant an injunction restraining infringement of a UK SEP unless the defendant enters into a global licence under a multinational patent portfolio;
– to determine the rates/terms for such a licence; and
– to declare that such rates/terms are FRAND?’

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UKSC Blog, 26th August 2020

Source: ukscblog.com

Mother wins appeal over request for French court to assume jurisdiction of care case – Local Government Lawyer

‘The Court of Appeal has allowed an appeal by a mother against an order secured during care proceedings by an unnamed local authority to request a French family court to assume jurisdiction of a case involving her son’s care under Article 15 of Council Regulation (EC) 2201/2003.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 13th August 2020

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Court of Appeal hands down ruling on changing nationality of children in care – Local Government Lawyer

‘A local authority cannot seek to change the nationality of children in care without the matter being considered by the High Court, the Court of Appeal has ruled.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 13th August 2020

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Macquarie Global Infrastructure Funds 2 Sarl v Rodino – Blackstone Chambers

Posted August 13th, 2020 in agreements, jurisdiction, news, shareholders by sally

‘The Commercial Court (Jacobs J) has dismissed applications to dispute the English Court’s jurisdiction in respect of claims for damages and declarations of non-liability in respect of proceedings brought by the Defendants in Luxembourg claiming damages in excess of €68 million. The decision illustrates the English Court’s commercially-minded approach to the construction of exclusive jurisdiction clauses and to the provisions of the Brussels I Recast Regulation that confer priority on courts seised under those clauses.

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Blackstone Chambers, 6th August 2020

Source: www.blackstonechambers.com

Family Law Newsletter – Spire Barristers

‘Issue #35 of Spire Barristers’ Family Law Newsletter: edited by Connie Purdy and Taz Irshad; news and Case Reviews by Georgina Dalton.’

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Spire Barristers, 22nd July 2020

Source: spirebarristers.co.uk

New Judgment: Lehtimaki & Ors v Cooper [2020] UKSC 33 – UKSC Blog

Posted July 30th, 2020 in charities, company law, fiduciary duty, jurisdiction, news, Supreme Court by sally

‘The Children’s Investment Fund Foundation is a charitable company with more than $4bn in assets helping children in developing countries. It was founded by Sir Christopher Hohn and Ms Jamie Cooper in 2002, but it became difficult to manage when their marriage broke down. These proceedings stem from the steps they took to resolve those difficulties. Specifically, they agreed that in exchange for a grant of $360 million to Big Win Philanthropy, a charity founded by Ms Cooper, she would resign as a member and trustee of CIFF.’

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UKSC Blog, 29th July 2020

Source: ukscblog.com

Dealing with Competing Jurisdiction Clauses: What is your Centre of Gravity? – 3PB

Posted July 30th, 2020 in contracts, interpretation, jurisdiction, news by sally

‘Complex commercial arrangements can generate difficulties for the parties where their obligations are set out in a multitude of related contracts or a single contract containing inconsistent dispute resolution clauses. It is not uncommon for parties to complex commercial contracts to find themselves arguing over the interpretation of inconsistent jurisdiction clauses which are either found in a single contract, or different but related contracts forming part of the same arrangements. Disagreements over the interpretation of jurisdiction clauses can arise in large-scale energy and infrastructure projects, and other types of arrangements where transactions usually take place under a master agreement. This note will explore the most common scenarios in which courts are often asked to interpret inconsistent dispute resolution clauses, with particular focus on the ‘centre of gravity’ approach adopted by courts.’

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3PB, 27th July 2020

Source: www.3pb.co.uk

Cape v Dring: High Court clarifies the proper approach to applications by non-parties for access to documents referred to at trial under the inherent jurisdiction and open justice principle – Henderson Chambers

‘The Cape v Dring litigation concerns an attempt by a non-party to obtain copies of the trial bundle used during a six-week asbestos trial involving Cape which settled before judgment in early 2017. At first instance the Master granted the non-party permission to have copies of all documents, including the trial bundle of 5000 pages of disclosure, referred to at the trial. The Supreme Court confirmed in July 2019 that the non-party was entitled to written submissions, witness statements and expert reports under the inherent jurisdiction of the court, but remitted the question of what, if any, documents in the trial bundle the non-party should obtain to the original trial judge. On 16 July 2020 Picken J considered that question and held that Mr Dring was not entitled to receive any other documents.’

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Henderson Chambers, 17th July 2020

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Enforcing an adjudicator’s decision where no order for payment – Practical Law Construction Blog

‘Much has been written on the Supreme Court case of Bresco v Lonsdale and it has most recently been relied on by a party in the adjudication enforcement case of WRW Construction Ltd v Datblygau Davies Developments Ltd. However, as will be discussed in this blog, it was of limited assistance.’

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Practical Law Construction Blog, 28th July 2020

Source: constructionblog.practicallaw.com

FGM protection order in child’s best interests – Court of Appeal – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted July 14th, 2020 in children, family courts, female genital mutilation, jurisdiction, news by tracey

‘A (A Child) (Rev 1) [2020] EWCA 731 (15 June 2020). This was an appeal by the secretary of state against a decision of the President of the Family Division concerning the exercise of the family court’s jurisdiction to make a female genital mutilation protection order (FGMPO) under the Female Genital Mutilation Act 2003 Sch.2 Pt 1 para.1.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 13th July 2020

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Case Preview: R (Gourlay) v Parole Board – UKSC Blog

Posted July 13th, 2020 in appeals, costs, jurisdiction, news, parole, Supreme Court by sally

‘In this case the “court” in question is the Parole Board. The inverted commas are because one of the issues is whether the Board is, in fact, a court for these purposes. Mr Gourlay is a life sentence prisoner. On 10 March 2014 the Parole Board refused to recommend that he be transferred to open conditions (almost always an essential precondition to later release). The Secretary of State usually, but does not always, accept such recommendations. Mr Gourlay challenged the Board’s refusal to make a recommendation. In accordance with a published “litigation strategy” that it has had since 2013 the Board did not engage with that challenge. That strategy takes advantage of a practice encapsulated in a case concerning coroners, R (Davies) v Birmingham Deputy Coroner [2004] 1 WLR 2739, which is that courts and tribunals will not usually be ordered to pay costs provided they have maintained a neutral stance. Mr Gourlay succeeded in his challenge, but both the High Court, and the Court of Appeal, held that Davies applied to the Board, and so Mr Gourlay did not recover his costs. This meant, amongst other things, that his lawyers were only entitled to be paid at around a quarter to a third of the rate they would have received if party-party costs had been awarded in Mr Gourlay’s favour.’

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UKSC Blog, 10th July 2020

Source: ukscblog.com

Supreme Court hands down judgment in Villiers v Villiers – Parklane Plowden Chambers

‘Charles and Emma Villiers married in 1994. They moved to Scotland the following year and lived there throughout their married life. The couple separated in 2012, when the wife and the parties’ daughter left the former matrimonial home and moved to England, where the wife continues to reside. Mrs Villiers issued a divorce petition in July 2013 on the basis of her habitual residence for 12 months preceding the presentation of the petition.’

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Parklane Plowden Chambers, 1st July 2020

Source: www.parklaneplowden.co.uk

Courts have no jurisdiction over “unwise” decisions where subject has capacity – Local Government Lawyer

‘The Mental Capacity Act 2005 does not permit the courts to intervene to prevent someone from making decisions that are unwise or damaging to them if they have the necessary capacity, the High Court has ruled.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 9th July 2020

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Villiers v Villiers – Blackstone Chambers

‘This appeal concerned the jurisdiction of an English court to make a maintenance order in favour of the wife (“W”) pursuant to s.27 of the Matrimonial Causes Act 1973 (“MCA”) in circumstances where the parties lived for most of their marriage in Scotland and the divorce proceedings issued by the husband (“H”) were conducted in Scotland.’

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Blackstone Chambers, 1st July 2020

Source: www.blackstonechambers.com

Security for Costs – International Pipeline Products Ltd v IK UK Ltd. and others – NIPC Law

Posted July 9th, 2020 in civil procedure rules, costs, jurisdiction, news by sally

‘This was an application by several defendants to a claim for breach of contract, conspiracy, breach of confidence and patent, copyright and unregistered design right infringement for security for costs. It was heard by Mr David Stone sitting as a deputy judge of the High Court on 1 May 2020. He gave an extemporary judgment on the day of the hearing and delivered detailed reasons on 24 June 2020.’

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NIPC Law, 8th July 2020

Source: nipclaw.blogspot.com

OHL v Qatar Foundation and tribunal’s powers to correct awards and scope of permissible challenges – Atkin Chambers

‘Challenges were brought by a contractor (JV) under sections 67 and 68(2)(b) of the Arbitration Act 1996 (AA 1996) in respect of an addendum award (the Addendum) issued by an International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) tribunal. The Addendum was issued following an application by the employer to correct a fourth partial award. JV’s challenges were dismissed and the judge gave helpful guidance as to the scope of AA 1996, ss 67 and 68 and the scope of a tribunal’s power to correct and/or interpret its award. Written by Simon Lofthouse QC and Zulfikar Khayum, barristers, at Atkin Chambers, and counsel for Qatar Foundation.’

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Atkin Chambers, 6th July 2020

Source: www.atkinchambers.com

Case Preview: Lehtimaki and Ors v Cooper – UKSC Blog

Posted July 6th, 2020 in appeals, charities, fiduciary duty, jurisdiction, news, Supreme Court by sally

‘In this post, James Warshaw, an associate in the Dispute Resolution team at CMS, previews the decision which is awaited in the matter of Lehtimaki and Ors v Cooper, which concerns whether the court has jurisdiction to direct members of a charitable company on how to exercise their powers absent a breach of fiduciary duty.’

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UKSC Blog, 3rd July 2020

Source: ukscblog.com