Computer Says No! Automated Decision-Making in the Public Sector, with the Public Law Project – Law Pod UK

Posted April 22nd, 2022 in artificial intelligence, computer programs, news, podcasts by sally

‘The application of technology to both justice and wider government decision-making is moving apace.’

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Law Pod UK, 22nd April 2022

Source: audioboom.com

Tetyana Krupiy: The Modern Bill of Rights creates barriers to challenging algorithmic decisions – UK Constitutional Law Association

Posted April 19th, 2022 in artificial intelligence, benefits, electronic filing, fraud, human rights, news by sally

‘Challenging inaccurate decisions of public authorities which fundamentally impact the life of the British public, could soon be harder. The UK government plans to replace the Human Rights Act 1998 with a Modern Bill of Rights. Its package of law reform proposals will make it very hard, and in some cases impossible, for individuals to challenge decisions produced by the operation of artificial intelligence decision-making processes in court. While individuals who experience discrimination in their daily lives will be particularly affected, all individuals will face barriers to accessing justice. This development is important in light of the fact that the UK government formulated a strategic priority in 2017 to create conditions for the growth of the artificial intelligence industry in the United Kingdom. As a follow up the UK government set up the Government Digital Service and the Office for Artificial Intelligence in 2019 in order to inform public authorities about how they can embed artificial intelligence technology into the provision of public services. This suggests that public authorities will make increasing reliance on the employment of artificial intelligence decision-making processes. The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) is already using artificial intelligence technology to detect which individuals are fraudulently claiming benefits.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 19th April 2022

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

Peers call for national body to regulate use of AI in justice system – Legal Futures

‘Peers have called for the creation of a new national body to regulate the use of artificial intelligence (AI) in the justice system and elsewhere in the public sector.’

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Legal Futures, 30th March 2022

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

Facial recognition firm faces possible £17m privacy fine – BBC News

Posted November 30th, 2021 in artificial intelligence, data protection, facial mapping, fines, news, privacy by tracey

‘An Australian firm which claims to have a database of more than 10 billion facial images is facing a potential £17m fine over its handling of personal data in the UK.’

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BBC news, 29th November 2021

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

We need real decisions about artificial intelligence – Local Government Lawyer

‘The regulatory framework around the use of artificial intelligence by local authorities is inadequate but existing governance mechanisms can address concerns, writes Sue Chadwick.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 26th November 2021

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Civil justice system “in desperate need of modernisation” – Legal Futures

Posted November 4th, 2021 in artificial intelligence, civil justice, dispute resolution, news, reports by sally

‘The civil justice system and some areas of the law in England and Wales are “in desperate need of modernisation”, a report by the Social Market Foundation (SMF) has found.’

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Legal Futures, 4th November 2021

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

Uber Faces Legal Action Over ‘Racist’ Facial Recognition Software – Each Other

‘Uber is facing legal action following revelations that its facial recognition algorithm is five times more likely to cause the termination of darker-skinned workers.’

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Each Other, 11th October 2021

Source: eachother.org.uk

Can AI qualify as an “inventor” for the purposes of patent law? – UK Human Rights Blog

‘The Court of Appeal has ruled that an artificial intelligence machine cannot qualify as an “inventor” for the purposes of Sections 7 and 13 of the Patents Act because it is not a person. Further, in determining whether a person had the right to apply for a patent under Section 7(2)(b), there was no rule of law that new intangible property produced by existing tangible property was the property of the owner of the tangible property, and certainly no rule that property in an invention created by a machine was owned by the owner of the machine.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 28th September 2021

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

UK employers can expect wave of new data and AI guidance – OUT-LAW.com

Posted September 1st, 2021 in artificial intelligence, data protection, employment, equality, news, privacy by sally

‘Fresh guidance on monitoring workers and on using artificial intelligence (AI) tools in recruitment is to be issued to employers in the UK under plans announced by two UK regulators.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 31st August 2021

Source: www.pinsentmasons.com

Malleable memory and the reliability of witness evidence in a digital age – Litigation Futures

Posted June 22nd, 2021 in artificial intelligence, documents, evidence, news, witnesses by sally

‘One of the topics explored by a recent panel of international experts at London International Disputes Week was the malleability (and thus fallibility) of human memory and the resultant impact on reliable witness evidence.’

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Litigation Futures, 22nd June 2021

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

Government considers plans to create national hub for court judgments – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted May 10th, 2021 in artificial intelligence, courts, judgments, Ministry of Justice, news by tracey

‘Plans to create the first single comprehensive repository of England and Wales court judgments are being considered by the government, the Gazette understands. Such a service, run by the National Archives, would publish almost every decision made by courts and tribunals, unlike the current selective system run by the British and Irish Legal Information Institute (BAILII).’

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Law Society's Gazette, 10th May 2021

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Call for work to make consumer-facing legal documents more intelligible – Legal Futures

‘Lawyers need to make consumer-facing legal documents more engaging, and regulators and industry should consider measures to ensure they are intelligible, a report has recommended.’

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Legal Futures, 19th April 2021

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

The challenges with data and AI in UK financial services – OUT-LAW.com

‘Financial services businesses should review the way they procure, manage and use data, and consider whether specific new processes need to be developed, to implement artificial intelligence (AI) systems in a way that customers trust, is effective and meets legal and regulatory standards.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 14th April 2021

Source: www.pinsentmasons.com

Algorithms and Education: A New Frontier of Discrimination? – Oxford Human Rights Hub

‘In this brief post, I want to demonstrate how ostensibly neutral and efficient algorithms can cause discrimination in education. Last year, the national advanced level qualifications (“A-levels”) exams in the UK that lead to places in university, further study, training, or work had to be cancelled because of school closures owing to the COVID-19 pandemic. In mitigation, the Office of Qualifications and Examinations Regulation (“Ofqual”) asked teachers to supply an estimated grade for each student and a ranking that compared with every other student at the school within the same estimated grade. This data went into an algorithm that also factored the school’s performance in the subject over the previous three years. The animating purpose behind the algorithm was to avoid ‘grade inflation’ and ensuring consistency with previous year’s results. When the grades were announced, the outcome was devastating for many. In England, Wales and Northern Ireland, nearly 40% of results were lower than teachers’ assessments. The effects of “downgraded” results were disproportionately felt in comparatively poorly resourced state schools.’

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Oxford Human Rights Hub, 15th March 2021

Source: ohrh.law.ox.ac.uk

Ep 137: The Law of Artificial Intelligence – Law Pod UK

‘In the latest episode of Law Pod UK Rosalind English talks to Matt Hervey, co-editor with Matthew Lavy of a new practitioner’s text book on Artificial Intelligence. Matt is Head of Artificial Intelligence at Gowling WLG., and advises on all aspects of AI and Intellectual Property, particularly in relation to the life sciences, automotive, aviation, financial and retail sectors. Our discussion ranges across many areas covered by the book, including negligence, liability for physical and economic harm, AI and professional liability, and more on AI and intellectual property, a fascinating subject which Matt touches on in this episode.’

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Law Pod UK, 1st March 2021

Source: audioboom.com

Time to consider regulating lawtech firms, report says – Legal Futures

‘The time has come for the Ministry of Justice (MoJ) to consider whether lawtech companies, along with other unregulated legal services providers, should be regulated, the Association of Consumer Support Organisations (ACSO) has said.’

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Legal Futures, 16th February 2021

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

BAILII grants access to judgments for mass AI analysis – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted December 14th, 2020 in artificial intelligence, judgments, news, universities by tracey

‘England and Wales court judgments are for the first time being opened to mass analysis by artificial intelligence, the Gazette can reveal. Under an agreement announced today, the British and Irish Legal Information Institute (BAILII) has granted academics at Oxford University bulk access to its database of 400,000 judgments for research purposes.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 14th December 2020

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Augmented lawyering: The challenge of AI is people, not money – Legal Futures

Posted December 9th, 2020 in artificial intelligence, law firms, legal profession, news by sally

‘The challenge facing traditional law firms from artificial intelligence (AI) is not a lack of finance to invest in technology but having the right “human capital”, a study from Oxford University has argued.’

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Legal Futures, 7th December 2020

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

AI redefining what it means to be a ‘great’ lawyer – Legal Futures

‘Automation in the legal profession will most probably be “a decades-long process” but artificial intelligence (AI) is redefining what it means to be a ‘great’ lawyer.’

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Legal Futures, 6th July 2020

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

Machine Learning in Healthcare: Regulating Transparency – UK Human Rights Blog

‘PHG, linked with Cambridge University, provides independent advice and evaluations of biomedical and digital innovations in healthcare. PHG has recently published a series of reports exploring the interpretability of machine learning in this context. The one I will focus on in this post is the report considering the requirements of the GDPR for machine learning in healthcare and medical research by way of transparency, interpretability, or explanation. Links to the other reports are given at the end of this post.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 18th June 2020

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com