Malleable memory and the reliability of witness evidence in a digital age – Litigation Futures

Posted June 22nd, 2021 in artificial intelligence, documents, evidence, news, witnesses by sally

‘One of the topics explored by a recent panel of international experts at London International Disputes Week was the malleability (and thus fallibility) of human memory and the resultant impact on reliable witness evidence.’

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Litigation Futures, 22nd June 2021

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

Government considers plans to create national hub for court judgments – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted May 10th, 2021 in artificial intelligence, courts, judgments, Ministry of Justice, news by tracey

‘Plans to create the first single comprehensive repository of England and Wales court judgments are being considered by the government, the Gazette understands. Such a service, run by the National Archives, would publish almost every decision made by courts and tribunals, unlike the current selective system run by the British and Irish Legal Information Institute (BAILII).’

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Law Society's Gazette, 10th May 2021

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Call for work to make consumer-facing legal documents more intelligible – Legal Futures

‘Lawyers need to make consumer-facing legal documents more engaging, and regulators and industry should consider measures to ensure they are intelligible, a report has recommended.’

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Legal Futures, 19th April 2021

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

The challenges with data and AI in UK financial services – OUT-LAW.com

‘Financial services businesses should review the way they procure, manage and use data, and consider whether specific new processes need to be developed, to implement artificial intelligence (AI) systems in a way that customers trust, is effective and meets legal and regulatory standards.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 14th April 2021

Source: www.pinsentmasons.com

Algorithms and Education: A New Frontier of Discrimination? – Oxford Human Rights Hub

‘In this brief post, I want to demonstrate how ostensibly neutral and efficient algorithms can cause discrimination in education. Last year, the national advanced level qualifications (“A-levels”) exams in the UK that lead to places in university, further study, training, or work had to be cancelled because of school closures owing to the COVID-19 pandemic. In mitigation, the Office of Qualifications and Examinations Regulation (“Ofqual”) asked teachers to supply an estimated grade for each student and a ranking that compared with every other student at the school within the same estimated grade. This data went into an algorithm that also factored the school’s performance in the subject over the previous three years. The animating purpose behind the algorithm was to avoid ‘grade inflation’ and ensuring consistency with previous year’s results. When the grades were announced, the outcome was devastating for many. In England, Wales and Northern Ireland, nearly 40% of results were lower than teachers’ assessments. The effects of “downgraded” results were disproportionately felt in comparatively poorly resourced state schools.’

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Oxford Human Rights Hub, 15th March 2021

Source: ohrh.law.ox.ac.uk

Ep 137: The Law of Artificial Intelligence – Law Pod UK

‘In the latest episode of Law Pod UK Rosalind English talks to Matt Hervey, co-editor with Matthew Lavy of a new practitioner’s text book on Artificial Intelligence. Matt is Head of Artificial Intelligence at Gowling WLG., and advises on all aspects of AI and Intellectual Property, particularly in relation to the life sciences, automotive, aviation, financial and retail sectors. Our discussion ranges across many areas covered by the book, including negligence, liability for physical and economic harm, AI and professional liability, and more on AI and intellectual property, a fascinating subject which Matt touches on in this episode.’

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Law Pod UK, 1st March 2021

Source: audioboom.com

Time to consider regulating lawtech firms, report says – Legal Futures

‘The time has come for the Ministry of Justice (MoJ) to consider whether lawtech companies, along with other unregulated legal services providers, should be regulated, the Association of Consumer Support Organisations (ACSO) has said.’

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Legal Futures, 16th February 2021

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

BAILII grants access to judgments for mass AI analysis – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted December 14th, 2020 in artificial intelligence, judgments, news, universities by tracey

‘England and Wales court judgments are for the first time being opened to mass analysis by artificial intelligence, the Gazette can reveal. Under an agreement announced today, the British and Irish Legal Information Institute (BAILII) has granted academics at Oxford University bulk access to its database of 400,000 judgments for research purposes.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 14th December 2020

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Augmented lawyering: The challenge of AI is people, not money – Legal Futures

Posted December 9th, 2020 in artificial intelligence, law firms, legal profession, news by sally

‘The challenge facing traditional law firms from artificial intelligence (AI) is not a lack of finance to invest in technology but having the right “human capital”, a study from Oxford University has argued.’

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Legal Futures, 7th December 2020

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

AI redefining what it means to be a ‘great’ lawyer – Legal Futures

‘Automation in the legal profession will most probably be “a decades-long process” but artificial intelligence (AI) is redefining what it means to be a ‘great’ lawyer.’

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Legal Futures, 6th July 2020

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

Machine Learning in Healthcare: Regulating Transparency – UK Human Rights Blog

‘PHG, linked with Cambridge University, provides independent advice and evaluations of biomedical and digital innovations in healthcare. PHG has recently published a series of reports exploring the interpretability of machine learning in this context. The one I will focus on in this post is the report considering the requirements of the GDPR for machine learning in healthcare and medical research by way of transparency, interpretability, or explanation. Links to the other reports are given at the end of this post.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 18th June 2020

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Home Office to face legal challenge over ‘digital hostile environment’ – The Guardian

‘Immigrants’ rights campaigners are to bring the first court case of its kind in British legal history in an attempt to turn off what they claim is a decision-making algorithm that creates a “hostile environment” for people applying for UK visas online.’

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The Guardian, 18th June 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

EP 112: Government’s reliance on AI in times of plague – Robert Spano – Law Pod UK

‘Robert Spano, who recently commenced his tenure as President of the European Court of Human Rights in the difficult circumstances of lockdown and remote working, discusses with Rosalind English the challenges we face with government’s reliance on automated decision making. This is a question rendered particularly sharp with the pandemic and the conditions under which the restrictions will be lifted.’

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Law Pod UK, 22nd May 2020

Source: audioboom.com

Use of Artificial Intelligence by the Judiciary in the Face of COVID-19 – Oxford Human Rights Hub

‘As one of the measures to prevent the spread of the new coronavirus, courts in major parts of the world are delaying trials and temporarily closing doors. While the move is reasonable in the face of the pandemic, the process could leave some cases in limbo for weeks, if not months. In the criminal context, this could be a huge barrier to access to justice for victims and in securing the rights of the accused. The Chief Justices of various judicial systems have issued guidance to trial courts seeking emergency orders to adjust or suspend court operations in light of the pandemic. In addition to these measures, new AI-based systems may prove helpful during these times and should, where available, be used to secure access to justice.’

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Oxford Human Rights Hub, 9th April 2020

Source: ohrh.law.ox.ac.uk

Let’s face it: use of automated facial recognition technology by the police – UK Police Law Blog

‘The case of R (Bridges) v Chief Constable of South Wales Police & Information Commissioner [2019] EWHC 2341 (Admin); [2020] 1 WLR 672 is said to have been the first claim brought before a court anywhere on planet earth concerning the use by police of automated facial recognition (“AFR”) technology. There could be nothing wrong with posting scores of police officers with eidetic memories to look out for up to a 800 wanted persons at public gatherings. So why not use a powerful computer, capable of matching 50 faces a second with a database of (under) 800 suspects, to do this job much more cheaply and instantaneously, flagging any matches to a human operator for final assessment? According to the Divisional Court in Bridges, this may, depending on the facts of each particular deployment, be lawful.’

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UK Police Law Blog, 21st February 2020

Source: ukpolicelawblog.com

Rules urgently needed to oversee police use of data and AI – report – The Guardian

‘National guidance is urgently needed to oversee the police’s use of data-driven technology amid concerns that it could lead to discrimination, a report has said.’

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The Guardian, 23rd February 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

“Artificial intelligence, machine learning, Algorithms and discrimination law: The new frontier” – Cloisters

Posted February 11th, 2020 in artificial intelligence, chambers articles, equality, news by sally

‘Robin Allen QC spoke on “Artificial intelligence, machine learning, Algorithms and discrimination law: The new frontier” at Michael Rubenstein’s Annual Discrimination Law Conferences in London and Edinburgh this month.’

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Cloisters, 7th February 2020

Source: www.cloisters.com

Standards committee backs AI “regulatory assurance body” – Legal Futures

Posted February 11th, 2020 in artificial intelligence, government departments, local government, news by sally

‘A body that identifies gaps in the regulatory landscape on the use of artificial intelligence (AI) and advises individual regulators is needed as the technology develops, the government has been told.’

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Legal Futures, 11th February 2020

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

Standards watchdog calls for guidance on governance and coherent regulatory framework for those in public sector using AI – Local Government Lawyer

Posted February 11th, 2020 in artificial intelligence, local government, news, reports, standards by sally

‘The government needs to identify and embed authoritative ethical principles and issue accessible guidance on AI governance to those using it in the public sector, the Committee on Standards in Public Life has said.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 10th February 2020

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

5 UK Human Rights Issues and Trends to Watch in 2020 – Each Other

‘From landmark legal cases to a landslide general election result, and civil disobedience to constitutional upheaval – the UK had no shortage of human rights news stories in 2019.’

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Each Other, 6th January 2020

Source: eachother.org.uk