The 1COR Quarterly Medical Law Review – Summer 2019 – Issue 2 – 1COR

‘Welcome to the second issue of the Quarterly Medical Law Review, brought to you by barristers at 1 Crown Office Row. This quarterly publication aims to provide summaries and comment on recent cases in medical law, including clinical negligence, regulatory, and inquests.’

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1COR, 7th August 2019

Source: www.1cor.com

Duty of care: inadequate safety nets? – No. 5 Chambers

Posted August 29th, 2019 in detention, duty of care, hospital orders, human rights, news, self-harm, suicide by sally

‘It was recently confirmed in Fernandes de Oliveira v Portugal [2019] ECHR 106 (no.78103/14, 31 January 2019) that a state’s positive obligation under Article 2 of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) applies not only to compulsorily detained patients, but also to those in hospital. However, there was a disappointing caveat. The European Court on Human Rights (ECtHR) concluded that “a stricter standard of scrutiny” might be applied to patients detained “involuntarily” following judicial order (para.124). Indeed, no Article 2 violation was found. In a partly dissenting Minority Opinion (MO), Portugal’s Judge Pinto De Albuquerque and Judge Harutyunyan describe the decision scathingly as “the result of a creative exercise of judicial adjudication for an imagined country” (MO, para.16). This article analyses the case law the ECtHR failed to apply, contends that the decision is plainly wrong, and argues that no differentiation between voluntary and involuntary patients can be justified.’

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No. 5 Chambers, 6th August 2019

Source: www.no5.com

Investigation prompts rapid upgrades to asylum seekers’ homes – The Guardian

‘Hundreds of asylum seekers crammed into a network of “guest houses” provided by a Home Office contractor that are overrun by cockroaches, rats and mice have seen a raft of improvements in the past few days after the Guardian exposed their dire living conditions.’

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The Guardian, 27th August 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

The Caparo Illusion: The Three-Stage Test Has Gone. What Happens Next? – 4 New Square

Posted August 23rd, 2019 in appeals, duty of care, negligence, news, Supreme Court by sally

‘In Robinson v. Chief Constable of West Yorkshire Police [2014] EWCA Civ 15 the Court of Appeal held that “the Caparo test applies to all claims in the modern law of negligence”. By the time the case reached the Supreme Court that well-known three-stage test had been held to be of no practical application. How and why did this volte-face occur? And where does that leave lawyers and judges when deciding whether a duty of care is owed or not? Mark Cannon QC and Joshua Folkard discuss.’

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4 New Square, 13th August 2019

Source: www.4newsquare.com

Equality and Homeless Appeals – Nearly Legal

‘Adesotu v Lewisham London Borough Council (2019) EWCA Civ 1405. We first saw this case as a county court appeal where the central issue was whether Equality Act 2010 issues could be raised and decided within a section 204 Housing Act 1996 homelessness appeal. HHJ Luba QC held that they could not, and the matter went to the Court of Appeal.’

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Nearly Legal, 11th August 2019

Source: nearlylegal.co.uk

‘Lolita’ phenomenon is allowing men to groom teenage girls without fear of arrest, Telegraph investigation reveals – Daily Telegraph

‘A boom in “Lolita” sites on Instagram, Facebook and other platforms is allowing paedophiles to target teenage girls without fear of arrest, an investigation by The Sunday Telegraph has found.’

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Daily Telegraph, 3rd August 2019

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

County council admits flawed practice of turning homeless children away, settles judicial review challenge – Local Government Lawyers

‘Essex County Council has settled a judicial review challenge brought on behalf of a 16-year-old homeless child, admitting that it had operated an unlawful practice of turning homeless children away from care in breach of section 20 of the Children Act 1989.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 4th July 2019

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

MPs call for urgent electoral law to cover digital campaigning – The Guardian

‘The government must urgently legislate to ensure digital campaigning is covered by electoral law, rather than hoping Britain will not have a general election until 2022, a parliamentary committee has warned.’

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The Guardian, 2nd July 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

‘Councils Cannot Blame Funding For Special Educational Needs Failures’, High Court Told – Rights Info

‘A lack of funding gives councils “no excuse” for failing to meet their legal duty to children with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND), a court has heard.’

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Rights Info, 27th June 2019

Source: rightsinfo.org

Ombudsman urges county council to bring its assessments into line with Care Act 2014 – Local Government Lawyer

Posted June 26th, 2019 in disabled persons, duty of care, local government, news, ombudsmen by sally

‘The Local Government and Social Care Ombudsman has called on Somerset County Council to put in place the recommendations he has made to bring its assessments into line with the requirements of the Care Act.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 24th June 2019

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Ep 83: Scope of Duty and Causation: Chester v Afshar revisited – Part 2 – Law Pod UK

Posted June 13th, 2019 in causation, doctors, duty of care, negligence, news by sally

‘In this episode we are bringing the second of two highlights from the recent one crown office row’s seminar – Scope of Duty and Causation: Chester v Afshar revisited. Dominic Ruck Keene dicusses the effects of the case.’

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Law Pod UK, 10th June 2019

Source: audioboom.com

Ep 82: Scope of Duty and Causation: Chester v Afshar revisited – Part 1 – Law Pod UK

Posted June 13th, 2019 in causation, doctors, duty of care, negligence, news by sally

‘In this episode we are bringing the first of two highlights from the recent 1COR seminar – Scope of Duty and Causation: Chester v Afshar revisited. We hear from Jonathan Metzer as he gives his interpretation of the case.’

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Law Pod UK, 10th June 2019

Source: audioboom.com

Legal aid lawyers “risk their mental health” with traumatic cases – Legal Futures

‘Legal aid lawyers in serious cases deal with trauma that is bound to have an impact on them, and they also have to start showing compassion to junior staff who suffer from burnout, a senior family barrister has said.’

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Legal Futures, 13th June 2019

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

Supreme Court gives new guidance on liability of local authorities – UK Human Rights Blog

‘Poole Borough Council v GN and another [2019] UKSC 25. The Supreme Court has found that Poole Borough Council did not owe a duty of care to two children, CN and GN, who it failed to re-house, despite the fact that they were suffering abuse from their neighbours. However, the court overruled previous authority and found that in some situations a duty of care might arise.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 7th June 2019

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

High Court considers Article 2 inquests in medical cases – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted May 23rd, 2019 in duty of care, human rights, inquests, learning difficulties, negligence, news by tracey

‘R (Maguire) v HM’s Senior Coroner for Blackpool and Fylde [2019] EWHC 1232 (Admin). A three-judge panel of the Divisional Court has re-affirmed that, in general, medical inquests do not engage the State’s positive obligations under Article 2 of the European Convention on Human Rights.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 21st May 2019

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Cadent handed record £44m penalty after customers left without gas – The Guardian

Posted May 23rd, 2019 in compensation, detention, duty of care, energy, inquiries, news by tracey

‘Ofgem takes action after tower block residents had no supplies for up to five months.’

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The Guardian, 22nd May 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

High Court considers Article 2 inquests in medical cases – UK Human Rights Blog

‘A three-judge panel of the Divisional Court has re-affirmed that, in general, medical inquests do not engage the State’s positive obligations under Article 2 of the European Convention on Human Rights.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 21st May 2019

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Student Natasha Abrahart’s suicide: Neglect a ‘contributory factor’ – BBC News

‘A university student took her own life partly as a result of neglect, an inquest has ruled.’

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BBC News, 16th May 2019

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Hillsborough safety officer fined £6,500 over safety breaches – The Guardian

Posted May 13th, 2019 in accidents, duty of care, fines, health & safety, news, sport by sally

‘Graham Mackrell, the secretary of Sheffield Wednesday football club, has been fined £6,500 after he was found criminally responsible for the dangerous turnstile arrangements in operation on 15 April 1989 when 96 people were killed at its Hillsborough stadium.’

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The Guardian, 13th May 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

Care home charity faces prosecution over death of teenager – The Guardian

Posted May 2nd, 2019 in care homes, charities, duty of care, mental health, news, suicide by tracey

‘A care home charity advised by the internationally renowned mental health worker Elly Jansen is facing criminal prosecution over the death of Sophie Bennett, a 19-year-old resident who took her own life.’

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The Guardian, 1st May 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com