1COR Quarterly Medical Law Review – Spring 2020 – Issue 5 – 1 Crown Office Row

‘Welcome to the fifth issue of the Quarterly Medical Law Review, brought to you by the barristers at 1 Crown Office Row.’

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1 Crown Office Row, 15th May 2020

Source: www.1cor.com

What Morrisons means for employer liability – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted May 21st, 2020 in causation, data protection, news, Supreme Court, vicarious liability by sally

‘The Supreme Court recently ruled that Morrison Supermarkets was not vicariously liable for a data breach committed maliciously by a former employee who disclosed employee payroll data online (WM Morrison Supermarkets plc v Various Claimants [2020] UKSC 12). The judgment clarified that the test for vicarious liability is whether the acts committed by the employee were ‘so closely connected’ with the acts that they were authorised to carry out by their employer that such acts ‘can fairly and properly be regarded as done’ by the employee acting in the ordinary course of his or her employment.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 18th May 2020

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

COVID-19 : a murderous virus? – Church Court Chambers

Posted May 19th, 2020 in causation, coronavirus, murder, news, prosecutions, unlawful killing by sally

‘Notwithstanding the seriousness of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and a global effort to fight the same, some individuals have taken it upon themselves to exacerbate the horror of the virus by spitting at others, purporting to have coronavirus. The Criminal Justice System is sadly accustomed to dealing with offences that involve threats to spread disease via bodily fluids; these offenders are often seeking to cause psychological terror and harm, rather than physical harm. However in circumstances such as this, the immediate psychological fear caused by the concern that the victim may have contracted the virus, may then be sadly outweighed by the pain and suffering of contracting the virus and subsequent death.’

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Church Court Chambers, May 2020

Source: churchcourtchambers.co.uk

An Insight into Business Interruption Insurance: Causation & Quantum – Hailsham Chambers

‘This article is the second in a series from Hailsham Chambers addressing insurance implications from the current Covid-19 situation. It explores various causation, mitigation and quantum issues that are likely to arise in that litigation.’

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Hailsham Chambers, April 2020

Source: www.hailshamchambers.com

Hearing in biggest ever group litigation to go ahead remotely – Law Society’s Gazette

‘The High Court has ruled that a hearing related to the biggest class action in history can go ahead remotely, in another sign of judges’ acceptance of a new default position during the coronavirus crisis.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 22nd April 2020

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

R (Carole Smith) v HM Assistant Coroner for North West Wales: Causation, admitted failings and what to record in the Record of Inquest – Parklane Plowden

‘On 7 April 2020, judgment was handed down in R (Carole Smith) v HM Coroner for North West Wales [2020] EWHC 781 (Admin). The case has important repercussions as to the relevance of admitted failures to Coroners’ conclusions and the extent of what should be recorded in the Record of Inquest (‘ROI’).’

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Parklane Plowden, 21st April 2020

Source: www.parklaneplowden.co.uk

EXE v Governors of the Royal Naval School [2020] EWHC 596 QB – 39 Essex Chambers

‘The Defendants employed a 30 year old man “Hughes” as a kitchen porter from 15 October 1990 to 10 July 1991 at their school for girls. He was provided with accommodation on the school premises. The Defendants were not aware that Hughes had a criminal record, including offences of indecent assault on a female and unlawful sexual intercourse with a girl under the age of 15. Had the Defendants been aware of these convictions, Hughes would not have been offered employment.’

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39 Essex Chambers, 22nd April 2020

Source: www.39essex.com

Causation in whistleblowing cases – St John’s Buildings

Posted April 17th, 2020 in causation, chambers articles, disclosure, employment, news, whistleblowers by sally

‘A worker has the right not to be subjected to a detriment on the ground that s/he has made a protected disclosure. However, the test of whether the protected disclosure was the reason in the employer’s mind for subjecting the worker to the detriment, and the placement of the burden of proving the same, can be confusing. Hopefully, this short note clarifies matters.’

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St John's Buildings, April 2020

Source: stjohnsbuildings.com

The Use of Statistical Evidence in Clinical Negligence Cases – 39 Essex Chambers

Posted April 17th, 2020 in appeals, causation, chambers articles, damages, negligence, news, statistics by sally

‘Can a claimant in a clinical negligence claim who is unable to prove the precise mechanism by which a positive outcome would have been achieved still succeed on causation? Yes, held the Court of Appeal in Schembri v Marshall[1]. The judgment also provides a useful summary of authorities dealing with the use of statistics for causation purposes in clinical negligence cases.’

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39 Essex Chambers, 8th April 2020

Source: www.39essex.com

Coronial causation in a mental health context: case comment by Simon Connolly – Park Square Barristers

‘The Claimant (mother of the Deceased) applied to judicially review the Coroner’s decision and record of inquest on five grounds.’

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Park Square Barristers, 9th April 2020

Source: www.parksquarebarristers.co.uk

Whistle-blowers Beware: Just because there is a PD doesn’t necessarily mean that the employer can’t respond (and damage your reputation) in order to ‘set the record straight’ – 3PB

‘Edwin Jesudason (‘C’), was a paediatric surgeon who was an honorary consultant working in the Department of Paediatric Surgery (‘DPS’) in the respondent NHS trust from 2006 until he resigned in 2012. Between 2009 and 2014 he made a series of allegations to the Trust, regulatory bodies and the media where he alleged fundamental failings in the operation of the DPS including serious allegations of professional incompetence, use of improper medical practices, attempts to cover up wrongdoing and in some cases he named and criticised specific individuals.’

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3PB, 2nd March 2020

Source: www.3pb.co.uk

Court of Appeal upholds no order for costs decision in housing case where claimant withdrew proceedings after being given new accommodation – Local Government Lawyer

Posted March 17th, 2020 in causation, costs, housing, judicial review, news by sally

‘A judge was entitled to conclude that the appropriate course was to make no order for costs in a housing case where legal proceedings were withdrawn because the claimant had obtained all the relief she was seeking, the Court of Appeal has found.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 16th March 2020

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

COA Considers Causation & the Reach of s.43G in Jesudason v Alder Hey Childrens NHS Foundation Trust – Old Square Chambers

Posted February 11th, 2020 in causation, disclosure, news, victimisation, whistleblowers by sally

‘Mr Jesudason was a consultant paediatric surgeon for the Trust. Between 2009 and 2014, he made a number of allegations to the Trust, several regulatory bodies and other third parties, including the media. These allegations related to serious failures and wrongdoing in the operation of his Department at the Trust. Following the termination of his employment, Mr Jesudason brought claims of whistleblowing. His claims were dismissed by the ET and the EAT. Giving the sole judgment in the Court of Appeal, Sir Patrick Elias dismissed Mr Jesudason’s appeal.’

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Old Square Chambers, 4th February 2020

Source: www.oldsquare.co.uk

Sanderson v Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation [2020] EWHC 20 (QB) – Parklane Plowden Chambers

Posted February 6th, 2020 in birth, causation, hospitals, news, personal injuries by sally

‘The Claimant suffered from moderately severe cerebral palsy resulting from a short period acute brain hypoxia in the minutes preceding her delivery in February 2002.’

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Parklane Plowden Chambers, 27th January 2020

Source: www.parklaneplowden.co.uk

Sanderson v Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation [2020] EWHC 20 (QB). – Parklane Plowden Chambers

Posted January 28th, 2020 in birth, causation, negligence, news, personal injuries by sally

‘The Claimant suffered from moderately severe cerebral palsy resulting from a short period acute brain hypoxia in the minutes preceding her delivery in February 2002.’

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Parklane Plowden Chambers, 27th January 2020

Source: www.parklaneplowden.co.uk

What evidence does the adjudicator find useful when considering delay? – Hardwicke Chambers

Posted January 21st, 2020 in causation, construction industry, delay, news by sally

‘White Constructions, a developer, engaged a sewer designer (“IWS”) and water servicing coordinator (“SWC”) to design a sewerage solution that complied with New South Wales regulations. The initial design was rejected by the relevant authorities, but a second design was later submitted and accepted. Subsequently, White Constructions brought proceedings against IWS and SWC for failing to produce a sewer design acceptable to the relevant authority within a reasonable time period, submitting that this failure caused delay to the completion of the project and thereby led to significant additional costs. At trial, the parties were each permitted to engage their own experts to assess the alleged delay. White Construction’s expert used an ‘as planned versus as-built windows analysis’, stipulating that there had been a serious delay of 240 days. The Defendants’ expert used a ‘collapsed as-built (or “but-for”) analysis’, demonstrating that there had been, at most, a 19-day delay. However, neither evidences were used by the Court because the they seen as not being appropriate for the case. Instead, the Court appointed a third expert whose evidence was preferred. The Court found that no breach had been established and so damages were not awarded.’

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Hardwicke Chambers, 16th January 2020

Source: hardwicke.co.uk

Adverse Inferences Drawn From Failure to Adduce Noise Surveys: Brian MacKenzie v Alcoa Manufacturing (GB) Ltd [2019] EWCA Civ 2110 – Parklane Plowden Chambers

Posted December 10th, 2019 in causation, evidence, industrial injuries, news, noise by sally

‘The Claimant brought a claim for noise induced hearing loss (“NIHL”) which he alleged was caused by exposure to excessive levels of noise in the course of his employment with the First Defendant at the Second Defendant’s premises at various times between 1963 -1976. ‘

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Parklane Plowden Chambers, 5th December 2019

Source: www.parklaneplowden.co.uk

Prorogation: Constitutional Principle and Law, Fact and Causation – Oxford Human Rights Hub

‘The Prime Minister’s recent announcement that Parliament would be prorogued, thereby severely curtailing the opportunity for parliamentary debate, raises important issues of constitutional principle and law, and also issues concerning fact and causation. They are examined in turn.’

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Oxford Human Rights Hub, 31st August 2019

Source: ohrh.law.ox.ac.uk

You Can’t Always Get What You Want: Defending Applications For Interim Payments – Hardwicke Chambers

Posted August 29th, 2019 in causation, contribution, negligence, news by sally

‘Interim payment applications are often the battleground for pre-trial skirmishes, the warm-up before the main event. Recent cases have identified some successful arguments made by defendants in disputed IP applications and particularly the evidence needed by a defendant if they wish to successfully challenge an application.’

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Hardwicke Chambers, 8th August 2019

Source: hardwicke.co.uk

Linking it all together: Russell v PSP [2019] – Hardwicke Chambers

Posted August 29th, 2019 in causation, construction industry, negligence, news, tenders by sally

‘Every professional negligence lawyer knows that establishing the necessary causative link between a professional’s breach of duty and the loss suffered by the client can be the most difficult aspect of any claim. That can prove even more problematic in construction professional negligence cases, in particular those involving costs “overrun”, both because of the broader range of alternative hypotheticals and the number of other professionals involved with the project.’

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Hardwicke Chambers, 6th August 2019

Source: hardwicke.co.uk