Breach of Duty and Hospital Guidelines: Thorley v Sandwell & West Birmingham Hospitals NHS Trust [2021] EWHC 2604 (QB) – Ropewalk Clinical Negligence Blog

‘This case considered the interplay between hospital guidelines and breach of duty in the clinical negligence setting.’

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Ropewalk Clinical Negligence Blog, 12th October 2021

Source: www.ropewalk.co.uk

‘Negligent’ London firm defeats £12m claim for lack of causation – Legal Futures

Posted October 1st, 2021 in causation, construction industry, damages, law firms, negligence, news by tracey

‘Leading London law firm Withers has fought off a £12m claim on the basis of causation after the High Court ruled that it gave negligent advice to a property developer.
However, His Honour Judge Pelling QC, sitting as a High Court judge, found that the firm gave negligent advice on a settlement agreement, leading to an award of £270,000 in damages.’

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Legal Futures, 1st October 2021

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

Underwriting on trial – Mills & Reeve

Posted August 3rd, 2021 in causation, disclosure, evidence, inducements, insurance, misrepresentation, news by sally

‘James Thompson and Suzanne El-Safty consider the importance of underwriting evidence for insurers attempting policy avoidance, in the context of Zurich Insurance plc v Niramax Group Ltd [2021] EWCA Civ 590 (“the Niramax case”) and Jones v Zurich Insurance plc [2021] EWHC 1320 (Comm) (“the Jones case”).’

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Mills & Reeve, 30th July 2021

Source: www.mills-reeve.com

Meadows v Khan in the Supreme Court: Scope of Duty in Clinical Negligence Claims – Ropewalk Clinical Negligence Blog

‘In Meadows v Khan [2021] UKSC 21, the Supreme Court unanimously dismissed Ms Meadows’ appeal, finding that there was no principled basis for excluding a clinical negligence claim from the ambit of the ‘scope of duty principle’ in the tort of negligence. The judgment can be read here. This short blog looks at the majority’s reasoning.’

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Ropewalk Clinical Negligence Blog, 24th June 20201

Source: www.ropewalk.co.uk

Supreme Court Revisits Wrongful Birth Claims: an extended look — Robert Kellar QC and Owain Thomas QC – UK Human Rights Blog

‘In Khan v. Meadows [2021] UKSC 21 the Supreme Court has revisited the principles to be applied in “wrongful birth” claims: claims for the cost of bringing up a disabled child who would not have been born but for a doctor’s negligent medical advice/treatment. However, the judgment has implications beyond the world of clinical negligence litigation. The Supreme Court has taken the opportunity to clarify the components or ingredients of the tort negligence more generally. In particular, the Court has affirmed the importance of the “scope of duty” principle: a principle which limits the recoverability of damages wherever it applies. In particular, it is not sufficient for a claimant to establish that – with competent advice – they would have made a different decision about their treatment or care. They must also demonstrate that the particular harm that they have suffered fell within the scope of the defendant’s duty of care.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 24th June 2021

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Whistleblowing: causation, guidance for complex cases and judicial proceedings immunity – 3PB

‘In GMP v Aston we receive a helpful reminder of the approach to be applied in cases where there are multiple protected disclosures spanning a significant period and allegations of multiple detriments involving multiple perpetrators and multiple victims. The case also involves an alleged detriment consisting of evidence given in other tribunal proceedings which was subject to judicial proceedings immunity (JPI) and deals with the issue of whether evidence which is covered by JPI can amount to a detriment. Finally, where the issue of JPI had not been raised before the first instance Tribunal, the Appeal Tribunal considered whether it had to deal with this newly argued point (i.e. whether it was mandatory) or whether it had a discretion to consider the newly argued point (i.e. whether it was discretionary). The considerations when deciding whether or not to exercise the discretion are also set out.’

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3PB, 10th June 2021

Source: www.3pb.co.uk

The limits of a reply – Practical Law: Construction Blog

Posted June 11th, 2021 in causation, construction industry, contracts, news, pleadings by tracey

‘A claimant who receives a defence is not required to take any further step in relation to the statements of case. It can consider the pleadings closed and seek to move on to directions, disclosure, evidence and ultimately trial. Nevertheless, sometimes the claimant will want to react to or deal with the allegations made in the defence.’

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Practical Law: Construction Blog, 9th June 2021

Source: constructionblog.practicallaw.com

Defensive Advising Strategies 1: What you learn from practising in the field of professional negligence – Wilberforce Chambers

‘Relatively speaking, barristers usually have rather broad practices. Even if (like me) a significant part of their practice is concerned with advisory work and drafting, barristers are often also engaged on various litigious matters relating to their underlying area of expertise, including professional negligence claims. By contrast, despite exposure to a variety of areas of practice whilst training, the organisation of many firms of solicitors can often have the effect that private client solicitors know little of litigation. For example, I once saw a draft witness statement prepared by a private client solicitor, where the parties in the heading were referred to separately in each capacity – as with a deed. And it is particularly problematic that private client lawyers often do not know very much about the field of professional negligence.’

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Wilberforce Chambers, 13th May 2021

Source: www.wilberforce.co.uk

Cauda Equina: Tells & Tales About the “Horse’s Tail” – Ropewalk Clinical Negligence Blog

Posted May 4th, 2021 in causation, doctors, hospitals, medical treatment, negligence, news by tracey

‘Cauda equina syndrome is a rare and severe type of spinal stenosis. A narrowing of the spinal canal causes the nerves in the lower back to become severely compressed. Typically, but not exclusively, it results from a prolapsed disc bulge. The condition requires urgent hospital admission and timely surgery (usually decompression of the disc). The longer it goes untreated, the greater the chance it will result in permanent paralysis and incontinence. On that account, it leads to claims for clinical negligence, notably in respect of delayed diagnosis, whether against hospital or GP. On that account too, such claims have latterly given rise to a number of decisions by the higher courts. The purpose of this blog is to review three of them.’

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Ropewalk Clinical Negligence Blog, 29th April 2021

Source: www.ropewalk.co.uk

Proving The Driver Isn’t Always At Fault – Old Square Chambers

‘Caroline Hall of DAC Beachcroft provides this case summary (via the DAC Beachcroft website) in the case of Vincent v Walker [2021] EWHC 536 (QB). Caroline, instructed by Mike Green at Zurich Insurance on behalf of the defendant driver successfully defended a claim brought by an injured pedestrian.’

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Old Square Chambers, 23rd March 2021

Source: oldsquare.co.uk

Court of Appeal urges Part 36 clarity after rejecting ‘not genuine’ offer – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted April 7th, 2021 in appeals, causation, costs, damages, news, part 36 offers, personal injuries by sally

‘The Court of Appeal has sent a firm message to litigators about the details required in a Part 36 after ruling that a claimant’s offer to settle at 90% was not genuine.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 7th April 2021

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Jehovah’s Witnesses congregation vicariously liable – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted March 25th, 2021 in causation, news, psychiatric damage, rape, vicarious liability by sally

‘In The Trustees of the Barry Congregation of Jehovah’s Witnesses v BXB [2021] EWCA Civ 356, the Court of Appeal has offered further guidance on vicarious liability following Supreme Court decisions last year in VM Morrison Supermarkets PLC v Various Claimants [2020] UKSC 12 and Barclays Bank v Various Claimants [2020] UKSC 13.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 25th March 2021

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Not all breaches lead to loss – a cautionary tale – Littleton Chambers

Posted January 22nd, 2021 in causation, chambers articles, compensation, damages, news by sally

‘“The bitter truth for an innocent party is that some breaches by its counterparty, however unscrupulous or unethical, result in no loss that can be recovered by an award of compensatory damages; cf. injunctive relief or gain-based damages. Damages are awarded for the breach itself not the manner of the breach”.’

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Littleton Chambers, 18th January 2021

Source: littletonchambers.com

FCA v Arch Insurance (UK) Ltd and others – St John’s Chambers

‘This short note summarises the key parts of the Supreme Court’s decision in this important test case, by which it allowed most of the FCA’s appeals against the decision of the Divisional Court and found largely in favour of policyholders.’

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St John's Chambers, 21st January 2021

Source: www.stjohnschambers.co.uk

New Judgment: Financial Conduct Authority v Arch Insurance (UK) Ltd and Ors [2021] UKSC 1 – UKSC Blog

‘In March 2020, the UK Government began to take a series of measures to combat the transmission of COVID-19. The present appeals considered the impact of these actions and measures on 28 clauses in the 21 lead policies written by the Appellant Insurers.’

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UKSC Blog, 15th January 2021

Source: ukscblog.com

Clinical negligence and COVID – Counsel

Posted November 19th, 2020 in causation, coronavirus, hospitals, negligence, news by sally

‘Spring 2020 forced fundamental changes on our healthcare system. Helen Mulholland examines the implications of COVID-19 for clinical negligence claims.’

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Counsel, November 2020

Source: www.counselmagazine.co.uk

FCA v Arch and Others [2020] EWHC 2448 (Comm): COVID-19 business interruption insurance – 12 King’s Bench Walk

Posted November 17th, 2020 in causation, contracts, coronavirus, financial regulation, indemnities, insurance, news by sally

‘The coronavirus pandemic has led to ongoing widespread business disruption and closures with a second national lockdown commencing this week. As such, certainty over whether business can bring claims under their business interruption (“BI”) insurance policies could not be more important.’

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12 King's Bench Walk, 2nd November 2020

Source: www.12kbw.co.uk

R v Broughton Clarifying Causation in Gross Negligence Manslaughter – 2 Hare Court

Posted November 17th, 2020 in causation, drug abuse, evidence, expert witnesses, homicide, negligence, news by sally

‘In 2017 a 24-year-old woman, Louella Fletcher Michie, died at the Bestival Music Festival, having taken 2-CP, a Class A drug, supplied by her boyfriend, the appellant.’

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2 Hare Court, November 2020

Source: www.2harecourt.com

Causation in insurance law – a new interpretation? – Hardwicke Chambers

Posted October 30th, 2020 in causation, chambers articles, insurance, interpretation, news by sally

‘The High Court in Financial Conduct Authority v Arch Insurance (UK) Ltd [2020] EWHC 2448 (Comm) have provided much needed guidance on business interruption insurance. Within the judgment was analysis on the law of causation for insurance policies. The decision may be perceived as, at best, widening the approach when undertaking the “but for” test, or at least providing much needed clarity to the test.’

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Hardwicke Chambers, 6th October 2020

Source: hardwicke.co.uk

Rapper Ceon Broughton wins appeal against manslaughter conviction following festival death of Louella Fletcher-Michie – Garden Court Chambers

‘Ceon Broughton, a rapper jailed over the death of his partner Louella Fletcher-Michie from a drug overdose at Bestival has won his appeal against his manslaughter conviction. Broughton’s conviction in 2019 and seven-year prison sentence for manslaughter was quashed on 18 August 2020 by the Court of Appeal. The appeal was heard before The Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales Lord Burnett, Mr Justice Sweeney and Mr Justice Murray.’

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Garden Court Chambers, 18th August 2020

Source: www.gardencourtchambers.co.uk