Cauda Equina: Tells & Tales About the “Horse’s Tail” – Ropewalk Clinical Negligence Blog

Posted May 4th, 2021 in causation, doctors, hospitals, medical treatment, negligence, news by tracey

‘Cauda equina syndrome is a rare and severe type of spinal stenosis. A narrowing of the spinal canal causes the nerves in the lower back to become severely compressed. Typically, but not exclusively, it results from a prolapsed disc bulge. The condition requires urgent hospital admission and timely surgery (usually decompression of the disc). The longer it goes untreated, the greater the chance it will result in permanent paralysis and incontinence. On that account, it leads to claims for clinical negligence, notably in respect of delayed diagnosis, whether against hospital or GP. On that account too, such claims have latterly given rise to a number of decisions by the higher courts. The purpose of this blog is to review three of them.’

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Ropewalk Clinical Negligence Blog, 29th April 2021

Source: www.ropewalk.co.uk

Proving The Driver Isn’t Always At Fault – Old Square Chambers

‘Caroline Hall of DAC Beachcroft provides this case summary (via the DAC Beachcroft website) in the case of Vincent v Walker [2021] EWHC 536 (QB). Caroline, instructed by Mike Green at Zurich Insurance on behalf of the defendant driver successfully defended a claim brought by an injured pedestrian.’

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Old Square Chambers, 23rd March 2021

Source: oldsquare.co.uk

Court of Appeal urges Part 36 clarity after rejecting ‘not genuine’ offer – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted April 7th, 2021 in appeals, causation, costs, damages, news, part 36 offers, personal injuries by sally

‘The Court of Appeal has sent a firm message to litigators about the details required in a Part 36 after ruling that a claimant’s offer to settle at 90% was not genuine.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 7th April 2021

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Jehovah’s Witnesses congregation vicariously liable – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted March 25th, 2021 in causation, news, psychiatric damage, rape, vicarious liability by sally

‘In The Trustees of the Barry Congregation of Jehovah’s Witnesses v BXB [2021] EWCA Civ 356, the Court of Appeal has offered further guidance on vicarious liability following Supreme Court decisions last year in VM Morrison Supermarkets PLC v Various Claimants [2020] UKSC 12 and Barclays Bank v Various Claimants [2020] UKSC 13.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 25th March 2021

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Not all breaches lead to loss – a cautionary tale – Littleton Chambers

Posted January 22nd, 2021 in causation, chambers articles, compensation, damages, news by sally

‘“The bitter truth for an innocent party is that some breaches by its counterparty, however unscrupulous or unethical, result in no loss that can be recovered by an award of compensatory damages; cf. injunctive relief or gain-based damages. Damages are awarded for the breach itself not the manner of the breach”.’

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Littleton Chambers, 18th January 2021

Source: littletonchambers.com

FCA v Arch Insurance (UK) Ltd and others – St John’s Chambers

‘This short note summarises the key parts of the Supreme Court’s decision in this important test case, by which it allowed most of the FCA’s appeals against the decision of the Divisional Court and found largely in favour of policyholders.’

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St John's Chambers, 21st January 2021

Source: www.stjohnschambers.co.uk

New Judgment: Financial Conduct Authority v Arch Insurance (UK) Ltd and Ors [2021] UKSC 1 – UKSC Blog

‘In March 2020, the UK Government began to take a series of measures to combat the transmission of COVID-19. The present appeals considered the impact of these actions and measures on 28 clauses in the 21 lead policies written by the Appellant Insurers.’

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UKSC Blog, 15th January 2021

Source: ukscblog.com

Clinical negligence and COVID – Counsel

Posted November 19th, 2020 in causation, coronavirus, hospitals, negligence, news by sally

‘Spring 2020 forced fundamental changes on our healthcare system. Helen Mulholland examines the implications of COVID-19 for clinical negligence claims.’

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Counsel, November 2020

Source: www.counselmagazine.co.uk

FCA v Arch and Others [2020] EWHC 2448 (Comm): COVID-19 business interruption insurance – 12 King’s Bench Walk

Posted November 17th, 2020 in causation, contracts, coronavirus, financial regulation, indemnities, insurance, news by sally

‘The coronavirus pandemic has led to ongoing widespread business disruption and closures with a second national lockdown commencing this week. As such, certainty over whether business can bring claims under their business interruption (“BI”) insurance policies could not be more important.’

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12 King's Bench Walk, 2nd November 2020

Source: www.12kbw.co.uk

R v Broughton Clarifying Causation in Gross Negligence Manslaughter – 2 Hare Court

Posted November 17th, 2020 in causation, drug abuse, evidence, expert witnesses, homicide, negligence, news by sally

‘In 2017 a 24-year-old woman, Louella Fletcher Michie, died at the Bestival Music Festival, having taken 2-CP, a Class A drug, supplied by her boyfriend, the appellant.’

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2 Hare Court, November 2020

Source: www.2harecourt.com

Causation in insurance law – a new interpretation? – Hardwicke Chambers

Posted October 30th, 2020 in causation, chambers articles, insurance, interpretation, news by sally

‘The High Court in Financial Conduct Authority v Arch Insurance (UK) Ltd [2020] EWHC 2448 (Comm) have provided much needed guidance on business interruption insurance. Within the judgment was analysis on the law of causation for insurance policies. The decision may be perceived as, at best, widening the approach when undertaking the “but for” test, or at least providing much needed clarity to the test.’

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Hardwicke Chambers, 6th October 2020

Source: hardwicke.co.uk

Rapper Ceon Broughton wins appeal against manslaughter conviction following festival death of Louella Fletcher-Michie – Garden Court Chambers

‘Ceon Broughton, a rapper jailed over the death of his partner Louella Fletcher-Michie from a drug overdose at Bestival has won his appeal against his manslaughter conviction. Broughton’s conviction in 2019 and seven-year prison sentence for manslaughter was quashed on 18 August 2020 by the Court of Appeal. The appeal was heard before The Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales Lord Burnett, Mr Justice Sweeney and Mr Justice Murray.’

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Garden Court Chambers, 18th August 2020

Source: www.gardencourtchambers.co.uk

Reining in the rule against reflective loss: Sevilleja v Marex Financial Ltd – Hardwicke Chambers

Posted July 30th, 2020 in causation, company law, damages, insolvency, news, shareholders, Supreme Court by sally

‘In a much-anticipated judgment, the Supreme Court in Sevilleja v Marex Financial Ltd unanimously allowed an appeal against a decision which, if it had been allowed to stand, would have denuded the intentional economic torts of much of their practical utility.’

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Hardwicke Chambers, 28th July 2020

Source: hardwicke.co.uk

Reflecting on “reflective loss”: Case note on Sevilleja v Marex Financial Ltd [2020] UKSC 31 – Hailsham Chambers

Posted July 30th, 2020 in causation, company law, damages, insolvency, news, shareholders, Supreme Court by sally

‘The appeal to the Supreme Court in Sevilleja v Marex Financial Ltd [2020] UKSC 31 re-states the principle that a company’s shareholders cannot recover damages against a wrongdoer for loss which is “reflective” of a loss caused by the wrongdoer to the company itself.’

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Hailsham Chambers, July 2020

Source: www.hailshamchambers.com

Sevilleja v Marex: Reflective Loss Restated – 4 New Square

Posted July 30th, 2020 in causation, company law, damages, insolvency, news, shareholders, Supreme Court by sally

‘The Supreme Court’s decision in Sevilleja v. Marex Financial Ltd, 15 July 2020, fundamentally restates the doctrine of reflective loss in company law so that:

A claim by a company’s creditor against a third party will not be barred where it reflects loss suffered by the company, even if the creditor is also a shareholder; and
There is no longer an exception to the doctrine where the wrongdoer has brought about the company’s impecuniosity.’

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4 New Square, 17th July 2020

Source: www.4newsquare.com

Court of Appeal Re-examines Test for Causation Under Section 15 of the Equality Act 2010 – Old Square Chambers

‘The Court of Appeal has delivered judgment in the case of Robinson v Department for Work and Pensions [2020] EWCA Civ 859, a decision which confirms that it is insufficient for a Claimant to argue, on a claim under section 15 of the Equality Act 2010, that “but for” their disability they would not have been put in a situation that led to unfavourable treatment. Rather, the focus needs to be on the reasons for the treatment itself. In so finding, the Court has approved of the obiter comments of Underhill LJ in Dunn v Secretary of State for Justice [2019] IRLR 298.’

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Old Square Chambers, 7th July 2020

Source: www.oldsquare.co.uk

Proving causation—business interruption insurance coverage amid coronavirus (COVID-19) – Monckton Chambers

Posted June 26th, 2020 in causation, chambers articles, coronavirus, insurance, news by sally

‘Steven Gee QC, commercial barrister and arbitrator, and Kristina Lukacova, barrister, both at Monckton Chambers, discuss coverage under business interruption insurance during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.’

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Monckton Chambers, 16th June 2020

Source: www.monckton.com

Daughters’ psychiatric claims restored over witnessing of father’s death – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted June 18th, 2020 in causation, news, psychiatric damage, striking out, third parties by sally

‘The High Court has ruled it was wrong to strike out secondary victim claims from daughters who witnessed their father die after he was allegedly victim of clinical negligence.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 12th June 2020

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

1COR Quarterly Medical Law Review – Spring 2020 – Issue 5 – 1 Crown Office Row

‘Welcome to the fifth issue of the Quarterly Medical Law Review, brought to you by the barristers at 1 Crown Office Row.’

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1 Crown Office Row, 15th May 2020

Source: www.1cor.com

What Morrisons means for employer liability – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted May 21st, 2020 in causation, data protection, news, Supreme Court, vicarious liability by sally

‘The Supreme Court recently ruled that Morrison Supermarkets was not vicariously liable for a data breach committed maliciously by a former employee who disclosed employee payroll data online (WM Morrison Supermarkets plc v Various Claimants [2020] UKSC 12). The judgment clarified that the test for vicarious liability is whether the acts committed by the employee were ‘so closely connected’ with the acts that they were authorised to carry out by their employer that such acts ‘can fairly and properly be regarded as done’ by the employee acting in the ordinary course of his or her employment.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 18th May 2020

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk