Property Newsletter: January 2020 – Hardwicke Chambers

Posted February 6th, 2020 in chambers articles, injunctions, landlord & tenant, news, travellers by sally

‘In this month’s newsletter Daniel Gatty considers airspace, subsoil and rights of first refusal, in an article in part taken from his recent book, A Practical Guide to Rights over Airspace and Subsoil, available to purchase: here.’

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Hardwicke Chambers, January 2020

Source: hardwicke.co.uk

Court of Appeal provides important guidance on late homelessness appeals, recognising the “difficulties faced by homelessness applicants in bringing an appeal… without legal advice and representation” – Garden Court Chambers

Posted February 6th, 2020 in appeals, chambers articles, homelessness, news, time limits by sally

‘Giving judgment in the case of Al-Ahmed v Tower Hamlets London Borough Council [2020] EWCA Civ 51 on 30 January 2020, the Court of Appeal gave important guidance on when a homeless applicant may be permitted to bring an appeal outside of the 21-day time limit, against a local authority’s decision on his or her homeless application. It rejected a High Court decision which had found that the requirements of bringing a homelessness appeal were not ‘especially sophisticated or taxing’ and therefore there was not a good reason why Mr Al Ahmed could not have issued the appeal as a litigant in person during the time limit.’

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Garden Court Chambers, 30th January 2020

Source: www.gardencourtchambers.co.uk

National Bank Trust v Ilya Yurov & Ors [2020] EWHC 100 (Comm) – Wilberforce Chambers

Posted February 6th, 2020 in banking, chambers articles, fraud, news, Russia by sally

‘Following an eight week trial in late 2018, the High Court has handed down judgment finding against the former majority shareholders of Russia’s National Bank Trust who were alleged to have misappropriated over $1billion of Bank funds via a sophisticated network of offshore companies.’

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Wilberforce Chambers, 27th January 2020

Source: www.wilberforce.co.uk

Chief Constable of Essex Police v Transport Arendonk BVBA (2020) – St Pauls Chambers

Posted February 6th, 2020 in chambers articles, duty of care, negligence, news, police, statutory duty by sally

‘A recorder had been correct not to strike out a negligence claim against a police force brought by the owner of cargo stolen from a lorry parked in a secluded lay-by at night while the driver was held at a police station on suspicion of drink driving. The possibility of a duty of care owed by the police was not precluded by statute, and there were no authorities that resolved the issue. The matter needed a full trial of the evidence.’

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St Pauls Chambers, 31st January 2020

Source: www.stpaulschambers.com

What is the Shortage Occupation List and why does it make a difference? – Richmond Chambers

Posted February 5th, 2020 in chambers articles, employment, immigration, news, visas by sally

‘The Shortage Occupation List sets out jobs in short supply in the UK at large, and Scotland specifically. These jobs can be filled by migrants under the Tier 2 route more easily than others.’

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Richmond Chambers, 3rd February 2020

Source: immigrationbarrister.co.uk

Reform of inheritance tax: an update – Wilberforce Chambers

Posted February 5th, 2020 in chambers articles, inheritance tax, news, taxation by sally

‘Last summer, I wrote a series of articles about the Office of Tax Simplification’s Inheritance Tax review, second report. There has now been a further development, in the form of the report of All-Party Parliamentary Group on Inheritance & Intergenerational Fairness (APPG), published in January 2020, entitled “Reform of inheritance tax”. The APPG was established in February 2019 and its stated purpose is “to examine the impact the current system of inheritance tax is having on members of the public and identify areas of reform and improvement as well as keep under review the issue of intergenerational fairness and bring forward potential solutions to help solve it”. It is one of the organisations which participated in the OTS’s consultation, providing a short paper in May 2019.’

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Wilberforce Chambers, 3rd February 2020

Source: www.wilberforce.co.uk

Inquest finds use of Taser by Devon and Cornwall Police contributed to death of Marc Cole when experiencing paranoia – Garden Court Chambers

‘The inquest into the death of Marc Anthony Cole has concluded with the jury finding he died from excess use of cocaine resulting in paranoid and erratic behaviour, with the use of a Taser by Devon and Cornwall Police having a more than trivial impact on Marc going into cardiac arrest. The medical cause of death included the use of cocaine, an episode of altered behaviour including self-harm, excitement, exertion and restraint including the discharge of a TASER X26 device.’

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Garden Court Chambers, 30th January 2020

Source: www.gardencourtchambers.co.uk

Court of Appeal adopts dominant purpose test – Henderson Chambers

‘Copying in your lawyer or having them at a meeting, does not necessarily mean that legal advice privilege will apply – in a law-changing judgment, the Court of Appeal has adopted the dominant purpose test in relation to Legal Advice Privilege.’

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Henderson Chambers, 30th January 2020

Source: www.hendersonchambers.co.uk

Article 6 breaches prove no magic bullet for convictions on appeal (R v Abdurahman) – 5 SAH

‘Rebecca Hill provides her Corporate Crime analysis for Lexis Nexis PSL: The Court of Appeal considered the safety of the conviction of Abdurahman who had assisted one of the 21/7 London bombers after the event. It reaffirmed that its purpose is to objectively appraise the safety of a conviction looking to all the circumstances, notwithstanding in this case a finding by the Grand Chamber of the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) that Mr Abdurahman’s rights under Article 6 of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) (right to a fair trial) had been breached.’

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5 SAH, 3rd February 2020

Source: www.5sah.co.uk

Vulnerable witness, domestic abuse and special measures- the importance of ensuring a fair trial – Becket Chambers

‘This article explores the approach a court should take in relation to vulnerable witnesses, in particular those that have experienced domestic abuse. The recent case of H v F [2020] EWHC 86 (Fam) demonstrates that a case will be successful on appeal if the correct procedures are not complied with.’

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Becket Chambers, 3rd February 2020

Source: becket-chambers.co.uk

Basfar v Wong – Diplomatic Immunity, Human Trafficking and “Commercial Activities” Revisited – Littleton Chambers

‘The EAT has handed down its judgment in Basfar v Wong UKEAT/0223/19/BA, holding that the defence of diplomatic immunity applied in circumstances where the Claimant alleged she had been trafficked by her diplomat employer. However, it also granted the Claimant the first ever ‘leapfrog’ certificate direct from the EAT to the Supreme Court, and the matter looks set to continue.’

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Littleton Chambers, 4th February 2020

Source: www.littletonchambers.com

“Should Cannabis Use be Legalised” An Article by Yasin Patel & Amy Hazlewood – Church Court Chambers

Posted January 30th, 2020 in chambers articles, drug abuse, medicines, news by sally

‘Cannabis, good drug or bad? The topic of debate internationally for decades by governments, medical professionals, recreational users and more. A renewed debate about the laws prohibiting or permitting cannabis use and supply around the world has been fuelled by the legalisation of supply and use of cannabis for ‘recreational’ purposes. Yasin Patel and Amy Hazlewood consider amongst other things, the use of cannabis, the legal history, advantages and disadvantages of legalising it.’

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Church Court Chambers, January 2020

Source: churchcourtchambers.co.uk

The Impact of Releasing Suspects ‘Under Investigation’ (RUI) – Drystone Chambers

Posted January 30th, 2020 in bail, chambers articles, Crown Prosecution Service, news, police by sally

‘Decisions about bail impact the physical and mental well-being of both complainants and defendants. It is imperative that the right decision about bail is made at the start of an investigation. We have recently seen an explosion in the use of RUI; this article addresses both the problems around RUI as well as potential solutions to it.’

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Drystone Chambers, January 2020

Source: drystone.com

Airspace, subsoil and rights of first refusal – Hardwicke Chambers

Posted January 30th, 2020 in chambers articles, landlord & tenant, leases, news by sally

‘In York House (Chelsea) Ltd v Thompson [2019] EWHC 2203 (Ch), [2019] 3 WLR 727 Zacaroli J. was asked to resolve various issues under the 1987 Act in a case where a husband and wife owned the freehold of a block of flats and, to preserve its development value, granted one or other of themselves leases of various parts of the block and its surroundings at peppercorn rents.’

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Hardwicke Chambers, 23rd January 2020

Source: hardwicke.co.uk

High Court critical of approach to evidence in Post Office litigation – Henderson Chambers

Posted January 30th, 2020 in chambers articles, computer programs, expert witnesses, news, postal service by sally

‘In the final judgment of this long-running group litigation, the court found numerous issues with the Post Office’s Horizon IT system and ruled in favour of the subpostmasters and subpostmistresses. The overarching point that emerges is the importance of advancing a realistic case, supported by properly considered and careful expert and factual witness evidence.’

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Henderson Chambers, 22nd January 2020

Source: www.hendersonchambers.co.uk

Case Note: Raiffeisen Bank International AG v Asia Coal Energy Ventures Ltd (1) Ashurst LLP (2) [2020] EWCA Civ 11 – Hailsham

Posted January 28th, 2020 in chambers articles, confidentiality, disclosure, news, privilege, solicitors by sally

‘The last few years has seen a raft of higher court authority dealing with questions of the nature of the law of the various types of privilege when it comes to disclosure of documents. In the latest case, the Court of Appeal has held that confidentiality and privilege is not lost in respect of documents pertaining to client instructions simply because a solicitor makes a statement to a third party pursuant to those instructions.’

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Hailsham Chambers, 23rd January 2020

Source: www.hailshamchambers.com

Conditional Fee Agreements and Contentious Business Agreements – Ropewalk Chambers

Posted January 28th, 2020 in chambers articles, costs, fees, news, solicitors by sally

‘Are all conditional fee agreements also contentious business agreements? And, if so, how might that effect a client’s right to an assessment of the costs charged by her solicitor under the Solicitors Act 1974?’

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Ropewalk Chambers, 23rd January 2020

Source: www.ropewalk.co.uk