Inevitability as the New Discrimination Defence: UK Supreme Court Mangles Indirect Discrimination Analysis While Finding the Two-Child Limit Lawful – Oxford Human Rights Hub

‘The UK Supreme Court has delivered its long-awaited judgment in R (on the application of SC, CB and 8 children) (Appellants) v Secretary of State for Work and Pensions and others (Respondents) on the two-child rule (in the Welfare Reform and Work Act 2016) limiting key subsistence benefits to two children per household, and it wastes no opportunity to disappoint.’

Full Story

Oxford Human Rights Hub, 26th July 2021

Source: ohrh.law.ox.ac.uk

Preserving causes of action in an insolvency context: reasonable diligence and the Limitation Act – Gatehouse Chambers

‘What is reasonable diligence when a company has entered an insolvency process and has abandoned its trading functions?’

Full Story

Gatehouse Chambers, 22nd July 2021

Source: gatehouselaw.co.uk

New Judgment: Test Claimants in the Franked Investment Income Group Litigation & Ors v Revenue and Customs [2020] UKSC 47 – UKSC Blog

‘The Supreme Court has unanimously allowed this appeal concerning the law of limitation.’

Full Story

UKSC Blog, 23rd July 2021

Source: ukscblog.com

Negligence action against lawyers over amputation not time-barred – Legal Futures

‘A man who received “devastating news” that his lower leg needed to be amputated seven years after settling his personal injury claim is not prevented by limitation from suing his lawyers for negligence, the High Court has ruled.’

Full Story

Legal Futures, 21st July 2021

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

The Building Safety Bill – Nearly Legal

‘This is, so we have been repeatedly told, the vehicle through which the government will save leaseholders from having to pay life-changing sums to remediate the fire safety defects which are so prevalent at blocks of flats across the country. The headline is that it does not do that (nor does it contain the details of the much delayed loan scheme). To the contrary, this Bill creates a bespoke process by which landlords of “higher-risk” buildings can recover their building safety costs even if their leases do not let them do so.’

Full Story

Nearly Legal, 5th July 2021

Source: nearlylegal.co.uk

Axminster: Limitation and forfeiture revisited after Lloyds – Wilberforce Chambers

Posted July 2nd, 2021 in chambers articles, forfeiture, limitations, news, pensions, trusts by sally

‘The High Court (Morgan J.) has delivered judgment in Punter Southall Governance Services Ltd v Hazlett [2021] EWHC 1652 (Ch), concerning the Axminster Carpets Group pension plan. It is now the leading judgment on limitation in claims by pension scheme beneficiaries for arrears. It also gives key guidance on the court’s power to award interest on such claims and on the interpretation and exercise of forfeiture clauses, and makes certain findings on the scope of s.37 of the Pension Schemes Act 1993. This summary only scratches the surface of a detailed 347-paragraph judgment covering several different areas of pensions and trusts law. A more flippant title might have been: “The Axminster Carpets case: a pile of issues…”’

Full Story

Wilberforce Chambers, 24th June 2021

Source: www.wilberforce.co.uk

Professionals, continuing duty and limitation – Mills & Reeve

Posted June 15th, 2021 in contracts, limitations, mistake, negligence, news by sally

‘Does a professional such as a solicitor, architect or pensions adviser have a duty to revisit their work and to correct a mistake they’ve made earlier? This is an important question for any professional and can be particularly significant when a client alleges that work done many years ago was negligent.’

Full Story

Mills & Reeve, 14th June 2021

Source: www.mills-reeve.com

Duty of care for the acts of third parties – Law Society’s Gazette

‘In Begum v Maran (UK) Ltd [2021] EWCA Civ 326, the Court of Appeal recently refused to dismiss a claim seeking damages from a UK-domiciled company following its sale of a ship to a third party, which arranged for its disposal in an unsafe manner. Although limited to arguability, it offers key insights into how duties could evolve into the consequences of corporates’ interactions with third parties.’

Full Story

Law Society's Gazette, 7th June 2021

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Firm avoids negligence penalty following out-of-time ruling – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted May 20th, 2021 in leases, limitations, mistake, negligence, news, solicitors by tracey

‘A professional negligence claim against solicitors was issued too late because the clock began ticking from when the mistake was initially made rather than when damage ensued, the Court of Appeal has ruled.’

Full Story

Law Society's Gazette, 19th May 2021

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Defensive Advising Strategies 1: What you learn from practising in the field of professional negligence – Wilberforce Chambers

‘Relatively speaking, barristers usually have rather broad practices. Even if (like me) a significant part of their practice is concerned with advisory work and drafting, barristers are often also engaged on various litigious matters relating to their underlying area of expertise, including professional negligence claims. By contrast, despite exposure to a variety of areas of practice whilst training, the organisation of many firms of solicitors can often have the effect that private client solicitors know little of litigation. For example, I once saw a draft witness statement prepared by a private client solicitor, where the parties in the heading were referred to separately in each capacity – as with a deed. And it is particularly problematic that private client lawyers often do not know very much about the field of professional negligence.’

Full Story

Wilberforce Chambers, 13th May 2021

Source: www.wilberforce.co.uk

Alerter by Ben Norton – Meaning of ‘deliberate’, ‘concealment’ and ‘breach of duty’ under s.32 Limitation Act 1980 – Henderson Chambers

Posted April 15th, 2021 in consumer credit, insurance, limitations, news by sally

‘Ben Norton considers the meaning of “deliberate”, “concealment” and “breach of duty” under s.32 Limitation Act 1980 in the context of the Consumer Credit Act’s unfair relationship provisions following Canada Square Operations Ltd v Potter.’

Full Story

Henderson Chambers, 19th March 2021

Source: www.hendersonchambers.co.uk

Limitation period for a tortious claim: when does it end? – Practical Law: Construction Blog

Posted April 12th, 2021 in construction industry, contracts, damages, limitations, negligence, news, time limits by tracey

‘Some breaches of contract do not become apparent until many years have passed. This is especially true where the result is a defect. Recently, our colleague Charlotte Mears blogged on limitation periods under contract. But what happens after the limitation period under a contract has expired? This blog explores the extent to which an answer lies in tort focusing on the tort of negligence.’

Full Story

Practical Law: Construction Blog , 7th April 2021

Source: constructionblog.practicallaw.com

Does the Limitation Act 1980 apply to adjudication? – Practical Law: Construction Blog

Posted March 31st, 2021 in construction industry, dispute resolution, limitations, news by tracey

‘Your starting point, like mine, to the above question, which I will leave you to mull over the Easter break, is likely “of course!”. But why? This question was first explored by Peter Clyde in his blog in 2012. Since then we have had the benefit of the Supreme Court’s decision in Aspect Contracts (Asbestos) Ltd v Higgins Construction plc, but does this change the analysis?’

Full Story

Practical Law: Construction Blog, 30th March 2021

Source: constructionblog.practicallaw.com

Limitation periods for breach of contract claims: where to begin? – Practical Law: Construction Blog

Posted March 29th, 2021 in construction industry, contracts, limitations, news, time limits by tracey

‘On the face of it, the law of limitation seems fairly straightforward. The law in England and Wales specifies that anyone bringing a breach of contract claim has six years from the date of the breach in which to do so. This period is extended to 12 years from the breach of contract if the contract has been executed as a deed. But what happens when a provision such as the one below is added into the mix? Does this work to extend the limitation period? If not, what exactly does this provision, which I’ll refer to as the Proposed Clause, mean?’

Full Story

Practical Law: Construction Blog, 23rd March 2021

Source: constructionblog.practicallaw.com

Vicarious liability for rape: Barry Congregation of JWs – Law & Religion UK

‘In Barry Congregation of Jehovah’s Witnesses v BXB [2021] EWCA Civ 356, Mrs B and her husband had attended the Kingdom Hall in Barry and in 1986 Mrs B was baptised as a Jehovah’s Witness. They became friendly with another couple, Mark and Mary Sewell. Mark Sewell was a ministerial servant and subsequently became an elder. On 30 April 1990, Sewell raped Mrs B in a room in his house – and that fact was undisputed. In 2014, Sewell was convicted of raping Mrs B and of indecently assaulting a girl aged under 14, CXC, and another individual and sentenced to 14 years’ imprisonment. Mrs B sued the Watch Tower Bible and Tract Society of Pennsylvania and the Trustees of the Barry Congregation and, at first instance, Chamberlain J held them vicariously liable for her rape. (He also determined that it was equitable to extend the time to allow the claims to proceed, pursuant to s.33 Limitation Act 1980). He awarded Mrs B £62,000 for psychiatric injuries attributable to the rape. On appeal, the defendants disputed.’

Full Story

Law & Religion UK, 24th March 2021

Source: lawandreligionuk.com

Government reveals long-awaited whiplash rules and tariffs – Law Society’s Gazette

‘The government has confirmed that legislation paving the way for whiplash reforms will come into force from 31 May. Newly-published draft statutory instruments have also finally indicated the tariff levels at which damages will be set for soft tissue injuries suffered in road traffic accidents.’

Full Story

Law Society's Gazette, 26th February 2021

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Mistaken Payments and Mistakes of Law under the Limitation Act 1980 – Hardwicke Chambers

Posted February 25th, 2021 in corporation tax, limitations, mistake, news, subsidiary companies by sally

‘The FII Group Litigation (‘FII’) was established by an Order made on 8 October 2003 with the purpose of determining common or related questions of law arising out of the tax treatment of dividends received by UK resident companies from non-resident subsidiaries. The Test Claimants’ basic allegation was that their tax treatment (under domestic legislation long-since repealed), as compared to that of wholly-resident UK companies, breached TFEU provisions on freedom of establishment and free movement of capital. The Test Claimants therefore sought repayment of tax paid insofar as it was unlawful under EU law; in some cases, dating back to the UK’s accession in 1973.’

Full Story

Hardwicke Chambers, 24th February 2021

Source: hardwicke.co.uk

Know your limits, show your limits: Lessons from Food Standards Agency v Bakers of Nailsea Ltd (2020) – St Philips Barristers

‘The Food Standards Agency (“FSA”) made three applications for the issue of a summons to commence proceedings against Bakers of Nailsea Ltd (“BNL”), the food business operator for an abattoir in Nailsea, near Bristol, for offences contrary to the Food Safety and Hygiene (England) Regulations 2013 (“the 2013 Regulations”).’

Full Story

St Philips Barristers, 9th February 2021

Source: st-philips.com

Limitation Practice in Clinical Negligence Cases After Azam – Ropewalk Chambers

Posted January 22nd, 2021 in appeals, chambers articles, delay, doctors, limitations, medical treatment, negligence, news by sally

‘Clinical negligence cases can be complex enough without the added difficulty of delay in bringing proceedings resulting in a limitation defence. When it is raised by Defendants it is currently common for cases to be managed so that limitation will be tried as a preliminary issue, perhaps because of the possibility of a major costs saving if a full trial can be avoided.’

Full Story

Ropewalk Chambers, 18th January 2021

Source: www.ropewalk.co.uk

Breaching Legal Advice Privilege – Family Law Week

Posted January 14th, 2021 in disclosure, documents, enforcement, fraud, legal services, limitations, news, privilege by tracey

‘Henry Clayton, barrister of 4PB, considers the circumstances in which documents which purport to be privileged are, in fact, admissible.’

Full Story

Family Law Week, 14th January 2021

Source: www.familylawweek.co.uk