SDT issues mental health warning to employers in case of solicitor under billing pressure – Legal Futures

Posted January 10th, 2018 in forgery, mental health, news, professional conduct, solicitors, tribunals by sally

‘The Solicitors Disciplinary Tribunal (SDT) has decided against striking off a solicitor it found had forged correspondence and lied to both her client and her employer, after finding that a root cause of her misconduct was the firm’s culture and the pressure it exerted on her to meet billing targets.’

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Legal Futures, 10th January 2018

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

Ryan v Villarosa [2017] UKUT 466 (LC) – Tanfield Chambers

Posted January 9th, 2018 in landlord & tenant, leases, news, repairs, tribunals by sally

‘In a conflict between a clear scheme of covenants and complimentary service charge machinery, and ambiguous declarations as to the relationship between one of the parties to the lease and a third party, (both contained in the same lease) the scheme takes precedence and is binding on the parties – coherence trumps uncertainty where provisions are in conflict.’

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Tanfield Chambers, 8th January 2018

Source: www.tanfieldchambers.co.uk

Westmark (Lettings) Limited v Peddle & Ors [2017] UKUT 449 (LC) – Tanfield Chambers

Posted January 9th, 2018 in appeals, costs, landlord & tenant, news, service charges, tribunals by sally

‘For the purposes of Section 20B(1) of the Landlord and Tenant Act 1985 (“the 1985 Act”) a relevant cost is incurred by an intermediate landlord when that intermediate landlord receives a demand from its own landlord in respect of services provided by it or a superior landlord. A residential tenant’s 18-month limitation period begins to run only when his or her immediate landlord receives a demand incurring the cost, not when the superior landlord providing the service originally incurs its own cost.’

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Tanfield Chambers, 8th January 2018

Source: www.tanfieldchambers.co.uk

SDT orders solicitor who failed to overturn £2,000 fine to pay £54,000 in costs – Legal Futures

‘The Solicitors Disciplinary Tribunal (SDT) has ordered a solicitor who tried to overturn a fine of £2,000 from the Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA) to pay £54,000 in costs following her unsuccessful appeal.’

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Legal Futuresm 9th January 2018

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

Clerical abuse of spiritual power and authority – Law & Religion UK

Posted January 9th, 2018 in Church of England, clergy, disciplinary procedures, news, tribunals by sally

‘On Monday 8th January, the Church of England reported the findings of the Bishop’s Disciplinary Tribunal for the Diocese of Oxford in the matter of a complaint under the Clergy Discipline Measure 2003 against The Reverend Timothy Davis, Vicar of Christ Church Abingdon, (‘TD’), in respect of the mentoring he provided to a 15/16 year old schoolboy (‘W1’) whose family were members of his congregation. The BBC reports that Church of England officials believed that this was the first occasion on which a tribunal had convicted a priest of spiritual abuse.’

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Law & Religion UK, 9th January 2018

Source: www.lawandreligionuk.com

Abingdon vicar guilty of ‘spiritually abusing’ boy – BBC News

Posted January 9th, 2018 in Church of England, clergy, disciplinary procedures, news, tribunals by sally

‘A Church of England vicar has been convicted by a tribunal of spiritually abusing a teenage boy.’

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BBC News, 8th January 2018

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Tribunal unimpressed by Mastercard’s “wholly unreasonable” costs in Merricks case – Litigation Futures

Posted January 4th, 2018 in appeals, class actions, competition, consumer credit, costs, news, tribunals by sally

‘The costs incurred by Mastercard in defending an attempt to bring one of the largest class actions ever appear “wholly unreasonable and disproportionate”, the Competition Appeal Tribunal (CAT) has found.’

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Litigation Futures, 2nd January 2018

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

Tribunal rules against total secrecy over UK drone strikes – The Guardian

‘The government’s power to block requests for information on national security grounds has been significantly curtailed by a tribunal ruling over targeted killings of British jihadists abroad.’

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The Guardian, 4th January 2018

Source: www.theguardian.com

Barrister suspended for giving client money ‘for food’ – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted December 18th, 2017 in barristers, disciplinary procedures, news, professional conduct, tribunals by sally

‘A barrister who gave a client cash to pay bills and buy clothes while he was representing her in criminal proceedings has been suspended for six months.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 15th December 2017

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Ukip to face tribunal over use of data in EU referendum campaign – The Guardian

Posted December 14th, 2017 in elections, news, political parties, referendums, tribunals by sally

‘Ukip is to face a tribunal over its use of analytics during the EU referendum after refusing to cooperate with an investigation by the Information Commissioner’s Office.’

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The Guardian, 13th December 2017

Source: www.theguardian.com

Robert Craig: The Fall-out from Evans: Positioning Roszkowski and Privacy International in a Post-Evans Constitutional Landscape (Part 2) – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘This post is in two parts. The first post (available here) addressed the detail of McCombe LJ’s judgment in Roszkowski v Secretary State for the Home Department (‘Roszkowski’) and in particular the impact of the differing judgments in R (Evans) v Attorney General (‘Evans’). This second post puts forward an alternative argument not canvassed in Evans or Roszkowski. A version of the argument was first suggested in a case note on Evans written by the author in the Modern Law Review. This second post also addresses some implications for Privacy International.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 11th December 2017

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

Iris Hyslop v 38/41 CHG Residents Co Limited [2017] UKUT 398 (LC) – Tanfield Chambers

Posted December 8th, 2017 in appeals, landlord & tenant, news, service charges, time limits, tribunals by sally

‘The First Tier Tribunal is entitled to rely on an applicant to send its application, but not the FTT’s subsequent decision, to the respondents to that application. Time will not start running for a party to apply for a permission to appeal until the FTT has itself provided a copy of its decision to that party.’

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Tanfield Chambers, 1st December 2017

Source: www.tanfieldchambers.co.uk

Termination payments to Spurs players not subject to national insurance, Tribunal confirms – OUT-LAW.com

‘Payments to two footballers for early termination of fixed term contracts were taxable as termination payments and not as general earnings, even though the contracts envisaged early termination by mutual consent, the UK’s Upper Tribunal has decided, upholding an early First-Tier tribunal decision.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 4th December 2017

Source: www.out-law.com

Thomas Fairclough: Privacy International: Constitutional Substance over Semantics in Reading Ouster Clauses – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘I have previously written on this blog and elsewhere about statutory interpretation and the rule of law. In the previous blog post I stated that the idea “that the courts will not allow the executive to escape their jurisdiction is well established as part of the rule of law” and referenced, inter alia, Anisminic Ltd v Foreign Compensation Commission [1969] 2 AC 147 (HL) to support this view.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 4th December 2017

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

Incurred and incurred again – Nearly Legal

‘Under section 20B(1) Landlord and Tenant Act 1985, a service charge must be demanded of the tenant within 18 months of the relevant cost having been incurred by the landlord. But what happens when there is a head landlord demanding a charge from an intermediate landlord who, in turn, passes the cost on to their lessees? When does the 18 months run from?’

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Nearly Legal, 1st December 2017

Source: nearlylegal.co.uk

Tribunal berates “careless and disrespectful approach” of SRA and solicitors it was prosecuting – Legal Futures

‘The Solicitors Disciplinary Tribunal (SDT) has criticised both the Solicitors Regulation Authority and two former directors of a Preston law firm for their “careless and disrespectful approach” in applying for approval of an ‘agreed outcome’ only a day before their hearing.’

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Legal Futures, 29th November 2017

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

Can you draw a line between this case and Anisminic? – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted November 28th, 2017 in appeals, investigatory powers, news, privacy, tribunals by sally

‘As all lawyers know, the great case about courts confronting a no-go area for them is the late 1960’s case of Anisminic.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, November 2017

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Privacy International v Investigatory Powers Tribunal – Blackstone Chambers

Posted November 23rd, 2017 in appeals, investigatory powers, news, privacy, tribunals by sally

‘The Court of Appeal has held that decisions of the Investigatory Powers Tribunal are immune from judicial review, as a result of the effect of a statutory ‘ouster’ clause in the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000.’

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Blackstone Chambers, 23rd November 2017

Source: www.blackstonechambers.com

Tribunal rejects call for disclosure of legal advice on amusement park project – Local Government Lawyer

Posted November 23rd, 2017 in compulsory purchase, disclosure, local government, news, privilege, tribunals by sally

‘An attempt by a former councillor to have Thanet District Council disclose legal advice obtained from law firm Trowers & Hamlins in relation to the operator chosen for the Dreamland Amusement Park has failed.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 22nd November 2017

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Age Assessment: Dental Assessments, Appearance and the Benefit of the Doubt – Garden Court Chambers

‘AS was born in Afghanistan. His father, who had worked as a commander in the police, was kidnapped by the Taliban. The family were later informed that he had been killed. The Taliban came looking for AS and it was decided that he should leave the country. He arrived in the UK on 7th September 2015 and claimed asylum. He was taken into the care of Kent County Council. His stated age of 15 was not accepted and an age assessment was undertaken, as a result of which he was found to be 17 with a date of birth of 7th September 1998. Judicial review proceedings were issued challenging this decision. During the course of proceedings, Kent changed its position and argued that he was most likely to be aged 24.’

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Garden Court Chambers, 10th November 2017

Source: www.gardencourtchambers.co.uk