Families sue UK government over ‘little or no education’ for their children – The Guardian

Posted May 12th, 2020 in coronavirus, education, ministers' powers and duties, news by sally

‘Four families who say their children have received “little or no” education since schools in England were closed to most pupils have started legal action against the government.’

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The Guardian, 7th May 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Boy, 8, Wins Legal Bid Against Home Office Policy Which Left Him Street Homeless – Each Other

‘An eight-year-old British boy and his migrant mum were unlawfully made street homeless by a Home Office policy which denied them social security payments, a court has ruled.’

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Each Other, 8th May 2020

Source: eachother.org.uk

Bereaved families seek ‘justice’ for UK victims of coronavirus – The Guardian

Posted May 12th, 2020 in bereavement, coronavirus, families, ministers' powers and duties, news by sally

‘Bereaved British families whose relatives died because of Covid-19 have formed a group to campaign for justice, demanding that the government accepts its failures may have contributed to their deaths.’

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The Guardian, 11th May 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Home Office accused of pressuring judiciary over immigration decisions – The Guardian

‘The Home Office has been accused of interfering with the independence of the judiciary after it emerged that judges were asked to provide written explanations for a rise in the number of detainees released from immigration centres during the Covid-19 pandemic.’

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The Guardian, 6th May 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Supreme Court president refuses to rule out stepping down if Boris Johnson tries to politicise judiciary – The Independent

Posted March 5th, 2020 in judiciary, ministers' powers and duties, news, Supreme Court by tracey

‘The president of the Supreme Court has declined to rule out resigning if Boris Johnson attempts to politicise the judiciary.’

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The Independent, 4th March 2020

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Theodore Konstadinides and Riccardo Sallustio: Clause 26 of the European Union (Withdrawal Agreement) Bill 2019-20: An Exercise of Constitutional Impropriety? – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘The European Union (Withdrawal Agreement) Bill 2019-20 will pave the way for the UK to ratify the UK-EU Withdrawal Agreement and thus depart from the European Union (EU) soon thereafter, having received its third reading in the House of Commons just last week. This contribution examines certain major consequences deriving from the Bill becoming law and, in particular, the controversial, but little discussed Clause 26 which (as Lord Pannick remarked in a recent article in the Times) requires particularly careful scrutiny.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 14th January 2020

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

Government revokes Brexit regulation after judicial review threat – Law Society’s Gazette

‘The government has pledged to not use Henry VIII powers to make Brexit legislation after a public law charity threatened legal action.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 17th October 2019

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Jeff King: The Prime Minister’s Constitutional Options after the Benn Act: Part II – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘This is the second of a two-part discussion of this theme. The first part addressed the obligations under the Benn Act and the legal response to attempts to frustrate it; this second part addresses non-confidence motions, resignation and change of Government. Heading numbering is continued from Part 1.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 10th October 2019

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

Jeff King: The Prime Minister’s Constitutional Options after the Benn Act: Part I – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘This is the first of a two-part discussion of this theme. This first part addresses the obligations under the Benn Act and the legal response to attempts to frustrate it; the second part will address non-confidence motions, resignation and change of Government.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 9th October 2019

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

Krishan Nadesan: Asking the Impossible: Benn, Kinnock and Extending Article 50 – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘Boris Johnson seems caught in an impossible bind. The European Union (Withdrawal) (No. 2) Act – the Benn Act for short – obliges him to seek an extension of Article 50 on 19 October. He can extend, honour the law, but break his promises. He can refuse to extend, honour his promises, but break the law. Or he can resign. The Benn Act appears to trap the Prime Minister between these unpalatable options. Nevertheless, he may be able to escape. For the Act may ask the impossible.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 1st October 2019

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

Sam Fowles: Cherry/Miller: What’s Next? – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘Yesterday the Supreme Court handed down its unanimous judgement in Cherry and Others v The Advocate General and Miller v the Prime Minister. The court found that the Prime Minister’s decision to prorogue parliament was unlawful and, consequently, null and void. This article aims to identify some of the immediate constitutional and political impacts of that decision.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 26th September 2019

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

Supreme Court: Suspending Parliament was unlawful, judges rule – BBC News

‘Boris Johnson’s decision to suspend Parliament was unlawful, the Supreme Court has ruled.’

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BBC News, 24th September 2019

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

John Major’s lawyer attacks No 10 prorogation claims as ‘misleading’ – The Guardian

‘Downing Street put out “misleading” statements about the prorogation of parliament and published excuses for Boris Johnson’s five-week suspension of the Commons that are “not the true reasons”, the supreme court has been told by a lawyer for the former prime minister John Major.’

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The Guardian, 19th September 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

Supreme Court: What happened in the suspension of Parliament case? – BBC News

‘This was no ordinary court case. The battle in the Supreme Court over the shutdown of Parliament is a historic test of the powers of the prime minister, MPs and the courts.’

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BBC News, 19th September 2019

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Brexit: Judge rejects parliament shutdown legal challenge – BBC News

‘A Scottish judge has rejected a bid to have Boris Johnson’s plan to shut down parliament ahead of Brexit declared illegal.’

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BBC News, 4th September 2019

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Former top judge lambasts Grayling and Truss in memoir – The Guardian

‘The former lord chancellor Chris Grayling “never believed access to social justice” was important while Liz Truss was a “disaster” in the same role, according to a highly revealing memoir by one of the country’s most senior, recently retired judges.’

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The Guardian, 21st August 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

Windrush victims still waiting for payments from Home Office – The Guardian

‘The government has still made no compensation payments to Windrush victims and has failed to introduce legislation that would allow damages to be paid, 15 months after Theresa May apologised for the scandal and promised a financial settlement.’

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The Guardian, 4th July 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

Home Secretary apologises to members of Windrush generation – Home Office

‘The Home Secretary has written 46 letters to people who were sanctioned under compliant environment policies and 7 to people with criminal convictions who were held under immigration detention powers at the end of their prison sentence.’

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Home Office, 10th June 2019

Source: www.gov.uk/home-office

EU citizens’ voting rights: ministers accused of ‘shocking complacency’ – The Guardian

‘The government has been accused of “shocking complacency” over the European election voting rights controversy as new data revealed that as few as one in 10 EU citizens were able to cast their vote in some areas of Britain.’

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The Guardian, 4th June 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

UK’s Top Spy Watchdog Steps Down, Commits To Review ‘Torture Loophole’ By October – Rights Info

Posted June 3rd, 2019 in intelligence services, ministers' powers and duties, news, torture by sally

‘The UK’s top spy watchdog has announced he will be stepping down in October, a week after a secret policy allowing ministers to approve actions that could lead to torture was revealed.’

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Rights Info, 31st May 2019

Source: rightsinfo.org