Health and Care Lasting Powers of Attorney – Family Law

Posted September 18th, 2020 in care homes, Court of Protection, health, medical treatment, news, powers of attorney by tracey

‘When we think about Lasting Powers of Attorney we usually think about property and financial affairs. There is, however, a second type of Lasting Power of Attorney which relates to health and care. In the current circumstances, it may be particularly relevant and important to consider putting in place health and care Lasting Powers of Attorney.’

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Family Law, 16th September 2020

Source: www.familylaw.co.uk

Naturalisation for EU citizens: comprehensive sickness insurance, the elephant in the room – EIN Blog

Posted August 19th, 2020 in brexit, citizenship, EC law, health, immigration, insurance, news by sally

‘As we head towards the end of the UK’s Brexit implementation period on 31 December 2020, the thoughts of many EU nationals (here I use the term to include EEA & Swiss citizens too) who have lived, studied and worked in this country, often for many years, are turning to becoming British.’

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EIN Blog, 19th August 2020

Source: www.ein.org.uk

Parents of toddler with severe epilepsy seek legal review of cannabis oil guidelines – The Guardian

Posted August 17th, 2020 in children, health, judicial review, medicines, news by sally

‘The parents of a toddler with severe epilepsy are seeking a landmark judicial review of rigid guidelines that effectively prevent the NHS from prescribing medical cannabis oil, a substance that they say has allowed their son to live a much healthier life, to thousands of sick children.’

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The Guardian, 16th August 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Coronavirus: ‘Institutional racism left minorities exposed’ – BBC News

Posted August 3rd, 2020 in coronavirus, employment, equality, health, inquiries, news, race discrimination, racism, Wales by sally

‘Institutional racism may have contributed to the disproportionate impact of Covid-19 on ethnic minorities in Wales, a top judge has claimed.’

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BBC News, 3rd August 2020

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Local Authority Powers: Coronavirus Update ‘Part 2A’ Public Health Orders – 4-5 Gray’s Inn Square

Posted July 30th, 2020 in coronavirus, health, local government, news, regulations by sally

‘As the UK emerges from lockdown, and as local spikes start to emerge, it is increasingly important that new cases of coronavirus are identified quickly and that anyone who may be infectious complies with guidelines on quarantine, self-isolation and contact tracing. This article considers the potential of Part 2A Public Health Orders as a tool for local authorities to enforce testing and quarantine requirements where infectious individuals refuse to comply voluntarily and pose a threat to public health.’

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4-5 Gray's Inn Square, 20th July 2020

Source: www.4-5.co.uk

UK set to bring in strict new junk food rules including pre-9pm ad ban – The Guardian

Posted July 24th, 2020 in advertising, coronavirus, food, health, news by sally

‘The government is set to implement strict rules on how junk food is advertised and sold in the UK, with restrictions such as a ban on online adverts and TV commercials before the 9pm television watershed.’

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The Guardian, 23rd July 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Green light given for judicial review challenge of £350 million hospital redevelopment plan – Local Government Lawyer

Posted July 9th, 2020 in budgets, health, hospitals, judicial review, news by sally

‘A judicial review into the allocation of funding for hospital services in Hertfordshire is to take place after campaigners for a new hospital successfully applied for a judicial review of the plan to redevelop the area’s existing hospitals.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 8th July 2020

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Navigating Market Authorisation in the UK for the pharmaceutical industry – 3PB

Posted June 18th, 2020 in health, licensing, medicines, news by sally

‘‘Marketing Authorisation’ must be obtained in respect of any medicinal product that is to be sold, supplied or offered for sale or supply in the UK. This article looks at the different types of authorisation available, including when they might be appropriate for use in respect of the UK only before considering the process adopted in the UK for approving medicines into the market. It is designed to be a beginner’s guide to bringing new products to market in the UK as opposed to a full explanation of each step; ultimately how the application itself is make will depend on the product itself and the research behind it. If upon reading this article you gain an understanding of how to begin the Market Authorisation process, then this article has served its purpose.’

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3PB, 4th June 2020

Source: www.3pb.co.uk

Nyasha Weinberg and Claudia Pagliari: Covid-19 reveals the need to review the transparency and independence of scientific advice – UK Constitutional Law Association

Posted June 16th, 2020 in coronavirus, health, ministers' powers and duties, news by sally

‘The tragedy of Covid-19 demonstrates the profound, life-saving, importance of good advice. It is essential that the governance system enables the best possible provision of scientific advice, a mechanism for correcting sub-optimal advice, and clarity around the difference between scientific advice and political decision making.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 16th June 2020

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

Safe workplaces and the commute to work – how far does section 44 of the Employment Rights Act 1996 go? – Six Pump Court

‘On 11 May 2020, the Government published practical Guidance[1] in a bid to encourage workplaces to be made as safe as possible for returning employees during the Covid-19 pandemic. Whilst the Guidance has been developed in consultation with unions and industry bodies, there still exists the very real possibility that employees do not have sufficient confidence that their workplaces are, in fact, ‘Covid-19 secure’ and consider that by returning, they have been subjected to a detriment by their employer.’

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Six Pump Court, 9th June 2020

Source: www.6pumpcourt.co.uk

Does the Buck Stop? Legal Liability for Death from Covid-19 – Garden Court Chambers

‘“If the government were an employee of mine I would have sacked them for gross negligence” – so said Anita Astley, manager of Wren Hall nursing home in Nottinghamshire, where 10 residents died from Covid-19 and 48 carers caught the virus in a three week period[1]. Ms Astley’s complaint poses in stark terms a question which has been circulating since the full and devastating extent of the consequences of the pandemic have become clear: what, if any, legal liability does the state have for deaths caused by Covid-19?’

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Garden Court Chambers, 9th June 2020

Source: www.gardencourtchambers.co.uk

Vaccination – No ‘biggie’ but still ‘a big deal’ – Transparency Project

‘Here, in the midst of a public health emergency, is an important Court of Appeal decision about immunisation.’

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Transparency Project, 10th June 2020

Source: www.transparencyproject.org.uk

Latest on the Lockdown Challenge in the UK courts – UK Human Rights Blog

‘On 26 May, judicial review proceedings were launched in the High Court which not only challenged the lawfulness of the Lockdown Regulations as having been made “ultra vires” under the 1984 Public Health Act, but also claimed that they are disproportionate to the threat posed by Covid-19. Philip Havers QC of 1 Crown Office Row is acting for the claimant.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 9th June 2020

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

What are the UK’s new quarantine rules? – The Guardian

Posted June 9th, 2020 in airlines, coronavirus, health, news, regulations by sally

‘The UK’s new quarantine rules have come into effect from today. What are the new restrictions on international arrivals and how will they be enforced?’

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The Guardian, 8th June 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

UK airlines launch legal battle over Covid-19 quarantine ruling – The Guardian

‘Britain’s three biggest airlines have started legal proceedings against the government in a bid to overturn quarantine rules due to take effect in the UK from Monday.’

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The Guardian, 7th June 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

Resumption of jury trials: an open justice “toolkit” – Doughty Street Chambers

‘For seven weeks Covid-19 shut the doors of jury trials in England and Wales. On 11th May 2020, the Lord Chief Justice and Lord Chancellor announced the resumption of new jury trials in “certain courtrooms under certain conditions” from 18th May 2020. In the interim, two guinea pig trials resumed at the Old Bailey.’

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Doughty Street Chambers, 18th May 2020

Source: insights.doughtystreet.co.uk

The Coronavirus and Employers’ Liability for PPE – Part 5: Liability of Employers to Family Members of Employees by Jack McCracken and Sarah Hopkinson – Ropewalk Chambers

‘Cases regarding secondary exposure to risk by employees’ family members have tended to focus on whether exposure of the employee was sufficient to place the employer under an obligation to act, and whether there was sufficient industry knowledge for the employer to appreciate the “secondary exposure” risk.’

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Ropewalk Chambers, 15th May 2020

Source: www.ropewalk.co.uk

The end of remote voting in Parliament: a backwards move? – Cloisters

‘On 21 April, the House of Commons passed a motion approving the introduction of “hybrid proceedings” to minimise the need for physical attendance in Parliament during the coronavirus lockdown. Since then, electronic voting has been facilitated to allow MPs to participate remotely in parliamentary votes (“divisions”). MPs cast their first remote vote on 12 May. However, the provision for remote voting has now lapsed. On 2 June, MPs are being asked to approve a motion which would make it mandatory for them to attend Parliament in order to participate in divisions. The proposal has caused consternation for MPs who are particularly vulnerable to coronavirus, or who live with vulnerable family members, as well as adverse comment from the Equality and Human Rights Commission.’

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Cloisters, 2nd June 2020

Source: www.cloisters.com

Training and risk assessments: a reminder from the High Court and returning to work in the Covid-19 crisis – 12 King’s Bench Walk

‘Sir Robert Francis QC (sitting as a deputy high court judge) recently handed down his judgment in Harris v Bartrums Haulage and Storage Ltd and another [2020] EWHC 900 (QB). It serves as a useful reminder of what employers must do to discharge their duty of care in terms of training and risk assessments. The key is being able to show that they are more than a “mere formality” [110]. On the facts of Harris, Sir Robert found that the First Defendant had acted negligently but dismissed the claim on causation. However, his critique of the First Defendant’s training and risk assessment process is relevant to all employers.’

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12 King's Bench Walk, 26th May 2020

Source: www.12kbw.co.uk

Anti-racism Protests: What Are Your Rights Amid The Pandemic? – Each Other

‘Anti-racism protests are taking place across the UK to demand justice following the death of George Floyd, the unarmed black man killed in US police custody.’

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Each Other, 5th June 2020

Source: eachother.org.uk