International law should be applied to cyberspace, Attorney General to say – The Independnet

‘International law should be applied to cyberspace to make it clear when a nation state has acted unlawfully and what action can be legally taken in response to a cyberattack, the Attorney General will say.’

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The Independent, 19th May 2022

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Priti Patel’s Rwanda plan for UK asylum seekers faces its first legal challenge – The Guardian

‘The first legal action has been launched against Priti Patel’s plan to send asylum seekers to Rwanda as the UN’s refugee agency raised concerns that the UK is “inviting” other European countries to adopt the same divisive immigration policy.’

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The Guardian, 7th May 2022

Source: www.theguardian.com

Why the UK-Rwanda Asylum Deal Risks Harming Global Standards – EIN Blog

Posted April 25th, 2022 in asylum, bills, government departments, immigration, international law, news by sally

‘Professor Heaven Crawley reflects on the newly announced asylum partnership agreement between the UK and Rwanda and its implications for and ramifications on global standards on refugees and asylum-seekers.’

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EIN Blog, 23rd April 2022

Source: www.ein.org.uk

War crimes: How are they defined, investigated and punished? – The Independent

Posted April 11th, 2022 in international courts, international law, news, Russia, Ukraine, war, war crimes, weapons by tracey

‘International Criminal Court’s chief prosecutor has already announced an investigation into Russia’s conduct in Ukraine as invasion continues and atrocities are alleged in Bucha.’

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The Independent, 10th April 2022

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Attorney General vows to put Russia’s war criminals ‘behind bars’ – The Independent

‘The Attorney General has vowed to put Russian soldiers found guilty of war crimes in Ukraine behind bars.’

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The Independent. 13th March 2022

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Russian oligarchs in UK face new laws tackling ‘dirty money’ – The Guardian

‘Boris Johnson has said that Russian oligarchs will no longer have a hiding place for their “ill-gotten gains” in the UK under legislation being introduced in parliament this week.’

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The Guardian, 28th February 2022

Source: www.theguardian.com

Nationality and Borders Bill: Why is it causing protests? – BBC news

‘Terrorists, war criminals, spies – that’s who the government says it’s targeting as part of a shake-up of immigration law. Under the Nationality and Borders Bill being debated in the House of Lords, if the British government wants to remove someone’s citizenship it will no longer need to tell them.’

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BBC News, 7th January 2022

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Karolina Szopa: Condemning the Persecuted: Nationality and Borders Bill (2021) and Its Compatibility with International Law – UK Constitutional Law Association

Posted January 6th, 2022 in bills, immigration, international law, news, treaties by sally

‘In light of the ongoing migration issues, the UK’s government set out to reform the immigration system to make it fairer and more efficient, while aiming to tackle people smuggling and prevent unsafe routes to asylum. The Nationality and Borders Bill 2021, currently awaiting a second reading in the House of Lords, was introduced in July 2021 as a potential solution.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 6th January 2022

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

Channel deaths: the UK has clear legal responsibilities towards people crossing in small boats – EIN Blog

‘At least 27 people have drowned in the English Channel attempting to cross in a small boat. There were three children, seven women, one of whom was pregnant, and 17 men. Although a joint search and rescue operation was seemingly launched in the narrow maritime area between the UK and France (which is only 20 miles wide), the highly equipped authorities of both coastal states were not able to intervene in time to save the victims. The British government has responded to these deaths by calling on France to take back anyone who attempts the crossing. Speaking in parliament following the tragedy, Home Secretary Priti Patel placed heavy emphasis on the French government’s responsibility for the tragedy, which she said was “not a surprise”.

Regardless of how these people got there, the UK has clear legal responsibilities to anyone who finds themselves in trouble in the Channel. However much French authorities bolster their own efforts, the UK is obliged by multiple international conventions to maintain robust search and rescue operations in the area.’

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EIN Blog, 26th November 2021

Source: www.ein.org.uk

Priti Patel faces three legal challenges over refugee pushback plans – The Guardian

‘Priti Patel is facing three legal challenges over her controversial plans to push back refugees on small boats in the Channel who are trying to reach the UK.’

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The Guardian, 25th November 2021

Source: www.theguardian.com

What is ecocide and how does it affect our rights? – Each Other

‘Voices from around the world have called for leaders at COP26 to create international law against ‘ecocide’. Lucy Skoulding explores what ecocide means and how existing legislation could be used to prevent it.’

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Each Other, 4th November 2021

Source: eachother.org.uk

Crimes of Arrival in the Nationality and Borders Bill – EIN Blog

Posted October 7th, 2021 in asylum, bills, immigration, international law, news, treaties by sally

‘The Nationality and Borders Bill further criminalises people coming to the UK to seek asylum. It does so by switching the emphasis from “entering” the UK to “arriving” in the UK. The difference is significant. Together with a combination of other powers, it means that people can be stopped from crossing the English Channel in small boats and turned away for criminal behaviour. If by luck they land on the English coastline, they can be prosecuted. But many such people will be asylum seekers, with a right to come to the UK and seek asylum. The proposal ignores the provision of the Refugee Convention (Article 31) that prohibits penalties being imposed on Refugees who enter or are present in a country without authorisation. The result is incompatible with UK international commitments.’

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EIN Blog, 6th October 2021

Source: www.ein.org.uk

Home Office chief refuses to tell MPs legal basis on which pushbacks in Channel can be used – The Independent

‘The Home Office has refused to disclose the legal basis on which it plans to use “pushbacks” in the English Channel to turn small boats around.’

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The Independent, 22nd September 2021

Source: www.independent.co.uk

In the Footsteps of Sir Francis Drake: Home Office Plans for the Seas in the Nationality and Borders Bill – EIN Blog

Posted September 16th, 2021 in asylum, bills, enforcement, immigration, international law, news, shipping law, ships by tracey

‘By its Nationality and Borders Bill, through new maritime enforcement powers, the Home Office seeks to extend its activity, beyond the United Kingdom territory, beyond UK territorial waters, and into international waters and into foreign waters. In so doing it seeks powers to stop, board, divert, and detain foreign ships and ships without nationality.’

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EIN Blog, 15th September 2021

Source: www.ein.org.uk

Insight: Is turning back migrants at sea compatible with international law? – House of Commons Library

Posted September 14th, 2021 in asylum, human rights, immigration, international law, news, treaties, United Nations by tracey

‘What does international law say about turning back migrants at sea, and can “pushback” tactics be used safely and legally?’

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House of Commons Library, 13th September 2021

Source: commonslibrary.parliament.uk

Legal experts worldwide draw up ‘historic’ definition of ecocide – The Guardian

‘Legal experts from across the globe have drawn up a “historic” definition of ecocide, intended to be adopted by the international criminal court to prosecute the most egregious offences against the environment.’

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The Guardian, 22nd June 2021

Source: www.theguardian.com

Torture victims kept in solitary by Home Office for up to a year – The Guardian

‘The Home Office has pursued a policy of psychological brutality by locking up scores of torture survivors in solitary confinement for indefinite periods, according to fresh testimony from immigration detainees.’

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The Guardian, 15th May 2021

Source: www.theguardian.com

The jurisdictional challenge of internet regulation – OUP Blog

Posted March 24th, 2021 in data protection, international law, internet, jurisdiction, news, privacy by sally

‘We live in an increasingly automated, data-driven world where choices and decisions are made for us, and sometimes, against us, and in which we are being subconsciously manipulated, based on the data trail we leave behind us. As a consequence, increasingly humanity is losing agency in favour of globally operating technology and media companies, who are building empires based on big data, data mining, and artificial intelligence. Their wealth and power stems from targeted advertising, but increasingly rests on the wealth of data and profiles of individuals which can be packaged and re-packaged to be sold to the highest bidder. The data collected is not just used for advertising, but also for surveillance, differential pricing, influencing elections, targeted misinformation, predicting sentiments in investment markets, and selling the data for managing corporate risk to the detriment of the consumer, particularly in respect of credit and insurance. Likewise, cybercrime uses techniques of profiling and exploitation of the vulnerable. The global data-driven economy is wide-ranging, has many benefits, but equally, high risks.’

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OUP Blog, 24th March 2021

Source: blog.oup.com

Government’s decision to cut international aid budget ‘was unlawful’ – The Independent

Posted March 22nd, 2021 in budgets, government departments, international law, news by tracey

‘The government’s decision to cut the international aid budget below its legal target was unlawful, a former director of public prosecutions has said. Lord Macdonald of River Glaven said new legislation would have been required to ditch the target of spending 0.7 per cent of international income on aid.”

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The Independent, 21st March 2021

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Trust in law at risk if ministers bypass parliament, says ex-legal chief – The Guardian

‘Public trust in the law is at risk if ministers continue to rush through hundreds of new rules and legislation, bypassing parliament and leaving citizens, businesses and police in the dark, the former head of the government’s legal department has said.’

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The Guardian, 18th February 2021

Source: www.theguardian.com