UK could be breaking international law over cladding, says UN – The Guardian

‘The UN has warned Britain that its failure to strip combustible cladding from high-rise buildings containing tens of thousands homes may be a breach of international law.’

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The Guardian, 28th June 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

C-19 damage: does international law hold any answers? – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted June 1st, 2020 in China, coronavirus, damages, human rights, international law, news by sally

‘What is international law for, if it cannot be enforced against the country responsible for breach? That is the question raised by a recent report documenting a series of steps by the Chinese Communist party to conceal from the World Health Organisation and the rest of the world the outbreak and human-to-human transmission of coronavirus. If we want a rules-based international order to mean anything, the authors of the report point out, it must be upheld.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 1st June 2020

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

A patent problem in the global antiviral race? – Counsel

‘Foreign patents could prevent UK citizens accessing treatment for COVID-19, warns Professor Mark Engelman.’

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Counsel, May 2020

Source: www.counselmagazine.co.uk

Interpol Red Notice issued against Anne Sacoolas – is prosecution in the UK possible? – 5SAH

‘Last December, Anne Sacoolas was charged with causing death by dangerous driving following a road traffic accident in which 19-year-old Harry Dunn lost his life. It is alleged that she was driving on the wrong side of the road at the time. Mrs Sacoolas’ husband was employed in some official capacity at a United States Air Force communication station based at RAF Croughton.’

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5SAH, 13th May 2020

Source: www.5sah.co.uk

What are likely to be barriers in being able to effect valid service? – Hardwicke Chambers

Posted April 20th, 2020 in chambers articles, international law, news, service by sally

‘It is assumed that the reference to the ‘Hague Convention’ is to the Hague Service Convention, concluded as part of the Hague Conference on Private International Law in 1965 (“the Convention”).’

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Hardwicke Chambers, 7th April 2020

Source: hardwicke.co.uk

Calls for Sheikh Mohammed to face justice over family abduction – BBC News

Posted March 6th, 2020 in children, families, forced marriages, international law, kidnapping, news by tracey

‘Ministers, police and prosecutors are under pressure to bring the ruler of Dubai to justice after a UK judge ruled that he orchestrated the abduction of two of daughters – one from the streets of Cambridge.’

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BBC News, 5th March 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

The luck of the law – when is criminal conduct a matter of concern to the international community? – 6KBW College Hill

Posted February 11th, 2020 in chambers articles, genocide, international courts, international law, news, torture by sally

‘Certain crimes transcend the territorial confines of any State and become a matter of concern to the world as a whole. In those cases, where a domestic prosecution is not likely or possible, other States or international courts may step in. Such crimes may qualify by the gravity of the acts themselves, as with genocide or crimes against humanity, or by the context in which they are committed, as in war crimes. Yet two recent cases – one in the UK, one at the International Court of Justice – demonstrate that external political factors can be equally determinative of whether a prosecution for the gravest of crimes will take place.’

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6KBW College Hill, 11th February 2020

Source: blog.6kbw.com

UK could forfeit security council seat over Chagos Islands dispute – The Guardian

Posted January 6th, 2020 in Chagos Islands, human rights, international law, news, United Nations by sally

‘The UK could lose its permanent seat on the UN security council unless it resolves the future of the Chagos Islands, the archipelago in the Indian Ocean whose largest island, Diego Garcia, is a US military base.’

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The Guardian, 5th January 2020

Source: www.theguardian.com

10 cases that defined 2019 – UK Human Rights Blog

‘And so, we reach the end of another year. And what a year it has been. As well perhaps the most tumultuous period in British politics for decades, this year saw the first ever image taken of a black hole, a victory for the England men’s cricket team at the World Cup, the discovery of a new species of prehistoric small-bodied human in the Philippines and signs that humpback whale numbers in the South Atlantic have bounced back thanks to intensive conservation efforts. And the law? Well, rather a lot has happened really. As the festive season draws near, what better way is there to celebrate than to rewind the clock and relive the 10 cases which have defined 2019?’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 19th December 2019

Source: ukhumanrightsblog.com

Why ‘where’ matters – jurisdiction considerations for international divorces – Family Law

Posted December 20th, 2019 in brexit, divorce, EC law, families, foreign jurisdictions, international law, jurisdiction, news by tracey

‘The question of whether to seek a divorce is one over which many people agonise. However, for divorcing couples with international connections, the associated questions of when and in which country to get divorced are also extremely important considerations, and ones which can have serious repercussions for the outcome.’

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Family Law, 18th December 2019

Source: www.familylaw.co.uk

Consent and expediency: binding non-signatories to international arbitration agreements – Six Pump Court

Posted December 4th, 2019 in arbitration, consent, enforcement, international law, news by sally

‘The issue of whether non-signatories to arbitration agreements can nevertheless be bound by such agreements is one of increasing importance as recourse to arbitration grows. The traditional limits of arbitration as defined by consent have come under increasing pressure given the enthusiasm for arbitration as the preferred means of dispute resolution in the context of international agreements.’

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Six Pump Court, 2nd December 2019

Source: www.6pumpcourt.co.uk

‘Deplorable and terrible’: Bar warned of UK’s dwindling role on world stage – Law Society’s Gazette

‘The United Kingdom’s legal status on the global stage is under threat, an international law expert has warned, citing Brexit, the prorogation of Parliament and the dwindling count of UK judges serving on the benches of international judges.’

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Law Society's Gazette, 25th November 2019

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

UK defies UN deadline to return Chagos Islands – The Guardian

‘Refusal to return archipelago to Mauritius “lawless” and “reflects colonial mindset” says barrister.’

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The Guardian, 22nd November 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

International Criminal Court may investigate UK ‘war crimes cover-up’ – BBC News

‘The International Criminal Court could open its first investigation into the British military following a BBC programme about alleged war crimes.’

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BBC News, 18th November 2019

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Commonwealth head warns of dangers of denying justice to all – The Guardian

‘Denying access to justice risks creating fresh conflicts at a time when the international rule of law is under threat, the Commonwealth secretary general has warned ahead of a meeting of the organisation’s law enforcement officers.’

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The Guardian, 5th November 2019

Source: www.theguardian.com

Tory minister admits UK breached court order banning arms sales to Saudi Arabia again – The Independent

‘The government has again admitted breaching a court order banning arms sales to Saudi Arabia over concerns they could be used in the Yemen war.’

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The Independent, 26th September 2019

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Government apologises for breaching court ruling against arms sales to Saudi Arabia – The Independent

‘The government has apologised for breaching a court ruling against the sale of weapons to Saudi Arabia that could be used in the Yemen conflict.’

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The Independent, 16th September 2019

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Philip Allott: The Legality of a No-Deal Brexit Could Be Challenged – UK Constitutional Law Association

Posted September 3rd, 2019 in brexit, EC law, international law, interpretation, news, time limits, treaties by sally

‘It may be that there is no such thing as a date of 31 October 2019 for a no-deal UK withdrawal from the EU. On 9 April 2019, according to Le Monde, Michel Barnier, chief negotiator for the European Council in the withdrawal negotiations with the UK, said: ‘The EU will never take a decision on a ‘no deal’. That will be a choice for the British.’’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 3rd September 2019

Source: ukconstitutionallaw.org

Jihadi Jack’s parents brand Sajid Javid a ‘coward’ over revoked citizenship – BBC News

‘The parents of a UK-Canadian man who joined the Islamic State group have said former Home Secretary Sajid Javid is a “coward” for revoking his British citizenship.’

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BBC News, 18th August 2019

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Attorneys General lead international cooperation to combat cybercrime – Attorney General’s Office

‘Five Attorneys General from the UK, USA, Canada, Australia and New Zealand have today formalised their international cooperation in the fight against cybercrime.’

Full press release

Attorney General’s Office, 31st July 2019

Source: www.gov.uk/ago